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Apr
27
comment Convincing colleague that playing to a metronome is a good thing?
I basically agree with this and have more or less expressed this to him. I think playing to a metronome is a skill that allows you to, strictly with a metronome, improve your timing... but it generally translates to playing with others well, if they have good timing. My feeling is, that he simply has a misunderstanding of what a metronome is and does and this sets up a believe that it somehow will not help him and potentially will hurt him. (but he's not really dedicated to "improving" himself musically at this point for whatever reasons... and that is a big factor too).
Apr
27
comment Convincing colleague that playing to a metronome is a good thing?
My feeling on it is that having a very solid steady sense of pulse(a metronome sense) allows one to understand the irregularities better. Regardless, I think a metronome mainly provides a different thing than the rhythmic feel you are talking about. A metronome allows one to "test" their accuracy and consistency. It is a "perfect" time keeper. Playing with other humans requires playing in time but also "in rhythm". It is also a skill to have... and they complement each other. But like many things, only doing one or the other is limiting.
Apr
27
comment Convincing colleague that playing to a metronome is a good thing?
Well, you are saying things he would say more or less :) (I didn't DV)
Apr
27
comment Convincing colleague that playing to a metronome is a good thing?
I do, I practice all the time(well, not all the time but)... It has helped me tremendously... While I have learned to play "in time" and to also feel the rhythm in the pulse of the metronome, which he has said is very hard for him. This tells me he just needs to practice to a metronome because it's specific feel creates uneasiness in him causing him to be off(it's not that he has bad timing, but more that the metronome "feel"(the simple clicks and pops") makes him uneasy. He can play to a drum track just fine, but that does obscure slight timing issues that the metronome makes obvious.
Apr
27
comment Convincing colleague that playing to a metronome is a good thing?
@alephzero I basically agree, the problem is that he plays well with a drummer I think and does have a relatively good sense of time. But like everyone, it can be improved and we routinely record to a click track and there are very subtle timing issues. Sometimes he's dead on but other times he's off and it eventually causes the music to have some timing issues... they are probably not noticeable to the causal listener but I believe the best way to fix it is to practice to a metronome... even if he has great time otherwise.
Apr
27
comment Convincing colleague that playing to a metronome is a good thing?
@CarlWitthoft It is world music mainly. But regardless, I am mainly talking about timing independent of musical style. As I agree with Dave that it is more about being "well rounded".
Apr
27
comment Convincing colleague that playing to a metronome is a good thing?
@Andy No, he can't read. He's mainly a blues player and believes feel is the most important thing. Unfortunately, his main problem is that he filters "feel" through his own senses. If it doesn't feel right to him(but others obviously do it, such as jazz), then it's bad or wrong. He seems to be unwilling to believe that the reason many things feel wrong to him is because he is not good at it. E.g., the reason he struggles with the metronome is not because playing in time is bad but because he is not good at it and he doesn't like that feeling... and thinks it's due to the metronome and not him
Apr
27
comment Guitar Picking improvement… is forcing EVER good
It's not tricky and will just happen at some point over minutes(it will be a breakthrough) and you'll know you are on the right path. Until then, the absolute only way for you to figure it out is to figure it out by practicing. You may have a different issue than someone else and hence their advice won't work and can actually make it worse. What I will tell you is that almost surely, as you have found, it is just practice... and it takes time. People think this stuff happens overnight by learning some "trick" when it really takes months and years of practicing. All the greats put in the time.
Apr
27
comment Guitar Picking improvement… is forcing EVER good
Note that there will probably be a change in your technique, that is what you are looking for. When it feels right, take note what you are doing and then try to start doing more of that. Remember that your technique has to change to find out the right one and therefor up have to try different things... not the same thing that doesn't work. I think the trick with speed picking for the RH is accuracy and consistency. You have to learn to experience all the ways the pick can deflect and how different forces act and build up the muscles and neurons that control these very fine movements.
Apr
27
comment Guitar Picking improvement… is forcing EVER good
This is what I did, I practiced on my right hand in as many various ways as I possibly could trying the standard tremolo, etc. After a few weeks of doing this 10 hours a day(ok, maybe an exaggeration), I eventually broke through. I realized 1. It takes time, just play As much as possible and focus only on solving that problem. Do drills with tremolo, don't do it at one tempo but all(e.g., from 50bpm to 250bpm). Accelerate and accelerate, etc. You must provide complete focus to analyzing the right hand technique, doing it watching TV won't work as well.
Apr
27
asked Convincing colleague that playing to a metronome is a good thing?
Apr
17
comment Why does a melodic half step resolve on the higher note?
All I can say is that, it's easy to claim stuff that you are claiming but you have no proof. I have proof, it comes from the OT series. At most you can say is that it is a distant relationship that has no bearing on reality. That actually is true to some degree, at least relatively speaking to the more basic dominant and triadic relationships. But when you bring in cultures as evidence of why I'm wrong, it's just a fallacious argument. It's the same as when a bible thumper says "Well, billions of people believe that Jesus Christ existed, why don't you?". It's not a logical argument.
Apr
17
comment Why does a melodic half step resolve on the higher note?
To even make this longer than it needs to be: I can sit at the piano and play a C major scale from C to B then play F next. The world doesn't collapse, I don't die, etc. But from the OT series, there is no support for doing so and hence it is an unexpected move(Think how some grand master chess players play some weird moves, not wrong, but just unexpected). The virtually infinite number of variables involved in why a culture decides to do something cannot be codified in a simple right or wrong, but it can be artificial or natural. Even western music has a tone of unnatural movements in it.
Apr
17
comment Why does a melodic half step resolve on the higher note?
To ignore the implications seems ignorant and foolish. Usually the argument is "X culture is just as valid as ours so I can't believe that they are wrong just because they 'contradict' the implications of the OT series". This is fallacious because we are talking about music. It it were engineering then the X culture wouldn't be very advanced, since you can't go against gravity and survive unless you have advanced far enough.
Apr
17
comment Why does a melodic half step resolve on the higher note?
So, this isn't about belief, it is about reality. Reality and physics say that the OT series is the ideal way pitches are heard in music. (An ideal string vibrates producing the OT series, non-ideal strings produce a strong approximation to the OT series). Any natural pitched instrument produces harmonics corresponding to the OT series more or less(this could be a big deal though culturally speaking and could explain some discrepancies). So, we have an objective basis to derive musical meaning from that is also what the human mind and ear have developed from.
Apr
17
comment Why does a melodic half step resolve on the higher note?
(Remember, I said they could be wrong just as they could be right) Music is about expression, going with the OT series express things in a more natural way only in the sense that our perceptions have been conditioned by it by evolution. Just as western music doesn't always move roots by P5ths down, the leading tone doesn't have to lead to the tonic all the time... regardless though, millions of years of the ear and mind developing by hearing the OT constantly in every aspect of nature(before there was the artificial) shaped how it is. You cannot argue against that without stronger facts.
Apr
17
comment Why does a melodic half step resolve on the higher note?
3. I didn't say they were wrong when they went against the leading tone. If you can find a culture that uses a scale where western culture hears a tone to lead to the another consistently, yet that culture does the opposite(resolves B down to F, say), then that culture is going against the natural tendencies of the OT series. Is it wrong? Yes, if you consider the OT series as the law of music. E.g., basically western music. If you consider the OT series the natural foundation of how we psychologically interpret music then it is not wrong, just different.
Apr
17
comment Why does a melodic half step resolve on the higher note?
@ScottWallace Just because you feel something is a certain way doesn't make it so. First: If you go ahead and use the overtone series as the foudnation you can't pick and choose what you want to accept from it, even if it makes some culture look "wrong or bad". 2. Music is not about right or wrong, so your assumptions about what culture follow or not follow are already flawed. I am strictly speaking objectively from what the OT series implies, it is no different than use the OT series to explain the strength of the dominant progression, yet you have no problem with that, correct?
Apr
16
comment Why does a melodic half step resolve on the higher note?
@ScottWallace Um, do you think that is proof of anything, you too are making assertions with little or no evidence. At least I base mine from common scientific principles. You believe that truth is ruled by what humans decide to do? Do you think that Pythagoras was making it all up? You don't seem to be able to separate your emotions from logic. For example, we are talking about the how the leading tone behaves and you bring up as a counter claim music that doesn't use the leading tone at all as proof about how it behaves. That's pretty ridiculous.
Apr
16
comment Why does a melodic half step resolve on the higher note?
@dom I will leave it at this! If you find fault with the theory I have used, you must also find fault with Rameau, Helmholtz and others who essentially use the same foundations to explain what is natural in music. It's ok if you don't agree with me or them but it is either your ignorance of the subject or you know something more than we do. But just arbitrary statements that look like they contradict the theory is not proof of anything and ultimately does not progress towards truer understanding.