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seen Apr 30 at 11:25

Aug
7
awarded  Yearling
Jun
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
20
comment Terminology for sounds and notes
I think that your fourth question is better put: "One enharmonic element of a scale" and for that, the correct term is "pitch class" or to some referred by as "chroma". Maybe you could also look into interval classes
Sep
18
awarded  Commentator
Sep
18
comment What is the importance of practicing scales on piano, and the proper fingering of them?
In addition to @bearcdp's well written answer, I'd like to point out that almost every piano-teaching book I've read, strongly emphasizes the importance of playing a song/riff in all of the 12 keys!. This is annoying in the beginning, but it helps you to get equally familiar with all the different keys (and not just C major and A minor).
Sep
18
comment What is the importance of practicing scales on piano, and the proper fingering of them?
@bearcdp: Not to forget the two white keys, B and E# ;)
Sep
15
answered Are the any great open questions in music theory?
Sep
1
answered How to build up to playing an F chord?
Aug
30
comment Musical Harmony: When to use more than three chords
@VarLogRant You play VIIdim, not to show off, but you use it instead of a V7(b9) (a dominant) chord. VIIdim contains exactly the same notes, but the tonic. Thus they can (often) be played interchangeable.
Aug
30
answered Musical Harmony: When to use more than three chords
Aug
22
comment How common is perfect pitch?
Just to support this answer: When you've listened to the same song a million times, you'll probably find yourself humming it, or "hear it" in your head. When you've done this many times you'll often find that you've remembered the pitch correctly. This is also a great way to practice it - to just regularly check if you're humming the right tone by checking it on the piano
Aug
22
comment Using modes and static harmony
I've updated the answer - I hope you'll find it more helpful now.
Aug
22
revised Using modes and static harmony
Elaborated the answer to include a description of the two different types of syntactic structures
Aug
21
comment Is there any way to improve composing?
Just to add a little detail: "Copying music" is technically coined "transcription". Transcription is a great tool for a musician and should certainly be valued highly.
Aug
20
answered Using modes and static harmony
Aug
7
awarded  Teacher
Aug
7
answered Inputtting note names into csound
Aug
7
comment Why does the Dorian mode on C have two flats?
Correct. They're called "Modes" as they're essentially same, but is different in harmonic use - And the most common modes (the diatonic) are called: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixo-lydian, Aeolian and Locrian.
Aug
7
comment Is solfege systems octave-agnostic?
Yes minor scales (and the others) use different syllables. A minor scale goes (in Denmark at least): 'Do-Re-Me-Fa-So-Le-Te-Do'. Notice the 'Me' instead of 'Mi', and 'Le' and 'Te', instead of 'La' and 'Ti'. About the scientific notation, well that's what Wikipedia calls it: Scientific pitch notation :)
Aug
7
awarded  Editor