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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 27 votes cast
Jul
31
revised How does string gauge affect intonation?
added 2 characters in body
Jul
10
revised Why are bass guitars so much shorter than a double bass?
added 1254 characters in body
Jul
10
answered Why are bass guitars so much shorter than a double bass?
Jul
1
revised play melody with perfect fourths on guitar
added 650 characters in body
Jun
30
revised play melody with perfect fourths on guitar
added 1080 characters in body
Jun
30
answered play melody with perfect fourths on guitar
Apr
15
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
13
answered Clean Amp + Distortion pedal vs Distortion from amp?
Oct
15
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
13
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
@leftroundabout I see my comment is wrong indeed. It is the source impedance, of course, which forms a voltage divider with the capacitance of the cable. Active pickups have a low source impedance, so the capacitance of the cable matters less. I don't see what I was thinking there.
Aug
4
comment Extra speaker for combo amp?
@davidstrachan The answers are always "No" and "Yes". Because if you know what you're doing, the questions aren't asked.
Jul
29
revised Guitar fret out of tune?
Improve wording.
Jul
27
comment Singing from a chord sheet, what is the relationship between notes sung and chords played?
This subject fills books, and is a big chunk of what music theory is about, at least Western; so it's not a good Q&A format. You can find good notes simply by trial and error: generate some ideas, and give them a critical listen. If you do that for years, you build a vocabulary of phrases. The theory comes later: it tries to classify and explain why people like how certain things sound and how they might actually be related to other, seemingly different ones. Then, in turn, it is possible to use the theory as a guide in creativity.
Jul
26
comment Singing from a chord sheet, what is the relationship between notes sung and chords played?
This topic is too broad; maybe you want to narrow it down to a question about several chords, and a particular melody that you sang which you think "works", the question being why those notes work with those chords.
Jul
26
comment Singing from a chord sheet, what is the relationship between notes sung and chords played?
I don't understand this question. Are you making up the notes? Or are singing the song as composed? Do you still have this question if there is a lyric sheet with all the "in between notes" for the chords and you follow those notes (i.e. is it important to the question that there is just a chord sheet with no notes)? If you're making up those notes, you're the improviser/composer: you tell me what the relationship is.
Jul
15
comment What does circled letters mean over sheet music?
In that case, it looks like abuse of notation. Since A and A' are different, it would be better to call them A and B. A' usually refers to something different from A, but closely related to A. Perhaps a variation derived from A.
Jul
11
revised What is the purpose of the mixolydian scale?
added 205 characters in body
Jul
5
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
@Tim But, it is not true that an SM57 has no response past 15 kHz. The ideal range is from 40 to 15 kHz, but Shure also publishes a frequency response graph. Clearly, the mic picks up higher frequencies, so you have some room to EQ. You also have to consider that when the mic is close to the source, it picks up more high frequencies than what a listener hears at a normal listening distance from the unamplified instrument. High frequencies disperse. If you use silky crisp condenser mic on a bright instrument and crank it into a PA, it could be too harsh!
Jul
5
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
@JCPedroza is right: for most instruments that have any "edge" to their sound, you can clearly hear a difference when you play with the 16 kHz and 20 kHz sliders on a 31 band equalizer. It subtly affects the "crispness" or "air" of the instrument. But: an SM57 microphone's response does not simply hit a cliff at 15 kHz. It just rolls off after that. Shure provides not only a nominal response range, but also a frequency response graph, which tells us that the unit does have response beyond 15 kHz.