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bio website kylheku.com
location Vancouver, Canada
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13h
revised Guitar fret out of tune?
Improve wording.
Jul
27
comment Singing from a chord sheet, what is the relationship between notes sung and chords played?
This subject fills books, and is a big chunk of what music theory is about, at least Western; so it's not a good Q&A format. You can find good notes simply by trial and error: generate some ideas, and give them a critical listen. If you do that for years, you build a vocabulary of phrases. The theory comes later: it tries to classify and explain why people like how certain things sound and how they might actually be related to other, seemingly different ones. Then, in turn, it is possible to use the theory as a guide in creativity.
Jul
26
comment Singing from a chord sheet, what is the relationship between notes sung and chords played?
This topic is too broad; maybe you want to narrow it down to a question about several chords, and a particular melody that you sang which you think "works", the question being why those notes work with those chords.
Jul
26
comment Singing from a chord sheet, what is the relationship between notes sung and chords played?
I don't understand this question. Are you making up the notes? Or are singing the song as composed? Do you still have this question if there is a lyric sheet with all the "in between notes" for the chords and you follow those notes (i.e. is it important to the question that there is just a chord sheet with no notes)? If you're making up those notes, you're the improviser/composer: you tell me what the relationship is.
Jul
15
comment What does circled letters mean over sheet music?
In that case, it looks like abuse of notation. Since A and A' are different, it would be better to call them A and B. A' usually refers to something different from A, but closely related to A. Perhaps a variation derived from A.
Jul
11
revised What is the purpose of the mixolydian scale?
added 205 characters in body
Jul
5
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
@Tim But, it is not true that an SM57 has no response past 15 kHz. The ideal range is from 40 to 15 kHz, but Shure also publishes a frequency response graph. Clearly, the mic picks up higher frequencies, so you have some room to EQ. You also have to consider that when the mic is close to the source, it picks up more high frequencies than what a listener hears at a normal listening distance from the unamplified instrument. High frequencies disperse. If you use silky crisp condenser mic on a bright instrument and crank it into a PA, it could be too harsh!
Jul
5
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
@JCPedroza is right: for most instruments that have any "edge" to their sound, you can clearly hear a difference when you play with the 16 kHz and 20 kHz sliders on a 31 band equalizer. It subtly affects the "crispness" or "air" of the instrument. But: an SM57 microphone's response does not simply hit a cliff at 15 kHz. It just rolls off after that. Shure provides not only a nominal response range, but also a frequency response graph, which tells us that the unit does have response beyond 15 kHz.
Jul
5
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
@JCPedroza I don't think that "the best way to record an accordion" is topical for this site anyway; it is not music performance, but an audio engineering question. This answer is practical musician advice: how to deal with other musicians who hang off you for support. That's not music performance either, but at least relevant to working musicians rather than working audio engineers.
Jul
5
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
@JasonC I also disagree with my comments about accordion amplification in general; which is why I never made them in general. The best way to capture almost any sound source is with multiple microphone placements which track the movement, and have an ideal frequency response, etc. Sometimes best is the enemy of good, though, as they say.
Jul
4
answered Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
Jul
4
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
@LeeWhite Or, more like, each accordionist had four mics because that's his hobby. If I were an accordionist, I'd have a preamp with four mics too, just because I could, and because I'd be a fanatic about great sound. Note that OP's band does not have an accordion in it; so why should he invest in specialized accordion amplification? This is for another band that is borrowing his equipment.
Jul
4
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
@JCPedroza The SM57 is what OP already has; it is not being suggested. Any other suggestion sets him back a hundred bucks. The SM57 is good past 15 KHz. Maybe it won't capture the "air" of the instrument, but that only matters if the instrument is played solo, and you're trying to make a perfect recording, intended for listening in a quiet environment on a great sound system in a great room. (We don't know how good the PA system is or the venue, or anything.)
Jul
4
comment Why does Fux use F# in his counterpoint to a firmus written in G mixolydian
He's just Fuxing with your head, that's all.
Jul
4
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
On a different note, I'd kill for a vintage SM54. :)
Jul
4
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
Yeah; vocalists should be encouraged to own their mics, to have control over the technical aspects of their sound. They should be encouraged to try many mics and hear themselves. And also to work with the mic to dynamically control their delivery (closer, farther, angle. ...).
Jul
4
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
@JCPedroza Who cares what the industry standard is for accordion amplification? I don't see where in the question it calls for an industry-standard accordion amplifying solution. The SM57 is a perfectly workable mic for this. It's almost identical to the SM58, which is a vocal mic. People have these mics laying around, so it's a cheap solution, compared to going out and buying some industry-standard accordion mic. If the accordionist is that serious, then they should own the mics and bring them to the gig. If they don't, they get stuck with a 57 or whatever there is.
Jul
4
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
@LeeWhite The solution certainly satisfies the definition of "feasible". It's perfectly feasible to get the accordionist to understand that, here is the mic, and so try to stay in one place, and play into that mic if you want to be heard. The word for what the solution isn't is "ideal".
Jul
4
comment Should I provide the mic for another band's accordionist? We we'll play on the same gig.
Four mics on an accordion is excessive. That's something you would do for some renowned accordion player, when recording an album, in order to capture the breathaking mojo of the accordion's tone, and the clatter of the keys, and the wind being drawn in, all on separate tracks so you can find the ideal mix of these.
Jun
12
comment Improving my guitar
Actually, cheap guitars can sound great. There is a point in expensive guitars: cork-sniffing snobbery. (It's not the only point: well-made instruments carefully made from good materials obviously have merit. But the element is undeniably there, especially past a certain dollar figure.) The snob factor would remain even if there was never a measurable difference in sound, playability or durability.