Reputation
2,078
Top tag
Next privilege 3,500 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
1 6 21
Impact
~97k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 115 votes cast
Jun
5
comment Evidence of Just Intonation in Recordings with Non-fixed-frequency Instruments
very interesting; let me ask another question rather than continue to chat here (as I want to know more!)
Jun
5
comment Evidence of Just Intonation in Recordings with Non-fixed-frequency Instruments
I'll check out the Chrysalid Requiem but what I'm more interested in is academic research into whether (as is often stated anecdotally) string players will naturally tend towards just intonation without even being aware they are doing so.
Jun
4
comment Equivalent Key Signatures
I always anecdotally thought string players preferred sharps. Not sure where I picked up that impression, though.
Jun
4
comment Equivalent Key Signatures
Modulation is the process of changing the key within a piece (e.g. from the tonic to the dominant). See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulation_(music) for a lot more information.
Jun
4
answered Why do we need note names like B♭, D♭ etc.? Why not use only A♯, C♯ and so on?
Jun
4
asked Evidence of Just Intonation in Recordings with Non-fixed-frequency Instruments
Jun
4
comment Examples of songs or phrases played in different temperaments
I wonder the extent to which string quartets or a cappella choirs are non-ET. They are often cited as examples of the tendency towards just intonation when not using fixed-frequency instruments but I'd be interested to know if that's demonstrably true in certain recordings, etc. music.stackexchange.com/q/3014/28
Jun
3
revised Equivalent Key Signatures
added 2 characters in body; added 89 characters in body
Jun
3
revised Equivalent Key Signatures
added 195 characters in body
Jun
3
comment Equivalent Key Signatures
@ogerard thanks! that's a great example
Jun
3
comment Equivalent Key Signatures
Regarding "He used one for the prelude and the other for the fugue"... which BWV?
Jun
3
answered Equivalent Key Signatures
Jun
3
awarded  Enthusiast
Jun
1
comment Sharp / Flat: Collectively known as property by what name?
I should add that in my computer music work, I use the term "letter" and "modifier" for the two parts of F♯
Jun
1
answered Sharp / Flat: Collectively known as property by what name?
May
31
answered How many voices do violins usually play in modern orchestral music
May
30
comment What's the difference between a G♭ and an F#?
@Gauthier definitely; they are different notes
May
30
comment What's the difference between a G♭ and an F#?
Gauthier, if the voice singing the third of an F♯ major chord has a B♭, that's an error. "Horizontal Readability" has nothing to do with it, it's just wrong.
May
30
answered Tool to help “read” sheet music
May
26
comment Are there any machine-readable databases of chord progressions available?
Probabilistic phrase structure grammars will give more large-scale structure, I think, but Markov chains are an obvious low-level tool and exactly the sort of thing I'd like the data for