1,980 reputation
1520
bio website jtauber.com
location Boston, MA
age 40
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Jun 4 at 10:39
Entrepreneur and Pinax Lead Developer; Web Standards and Open Source Guy; Movie Producer and Digital Cinematographer; Composer and Music Theorist; Greek Scholar and Doctoral Student in Linguistics

Apr
8
comment Are there any machine-readable databases of chord progressions available?
@ChrisCirefice I haven't made any progress towards collecting chord progressions in machine-readable form but you've prompted me to start looking again :-)
Dec
9
comment Non-fixed-frequency instruments playing by themselves versus with fixed-frequency instruments
@ReinaAbolofia but does that mean you'd call a piano "fretted" and a singer "non-fretted"?
Jul
6
comment Recommend reading why we have 12 pitches and another metrics in microtonal music?
+1 for Mathieu's book
Jun
19
comment What are some common jazz chord progressions?
I think this is an acceptable question; if we can have questions about a composer's or era's style, why can't we have questions about specific chord progressions that are common in a genre. An answer could talk about 12-bar blues, rhythm changes (and variants), other contrafacts, alternative turnarounds, etc. Seems like a decent question to me (at least as it currently stands in its edited form).
Jun
10
comment Is there any real difference between Counterpoint and Polyphony?
@Monica, yes, I shouldn't have said it was a renaissance/baroque split as late renaissance had counterpoint, notable Palestrina as you mention. But while there's a distinction between Palestrina and Bach, I think there's also a distinction between (say) Ockeghem and Palestrina
Jun
9
comment Is there any real difference between Counterpoint and Polyphony?
it wasn't going to last long anyway :-)
Jun
9
comment Is there any real difference between Counterpoint and Polyphony?
+1 that's better
Jun
9
comment Is there any real difference between Counterpoint and Polyphony?
@Rein I considered that but as I can't characterize the difference, I don't think it's a good answer :-) I'll make it one anyway
Jun
9
comment Is there any real difference between Counterpoint and Polyphony?
I believe counterpoint is a narrower term (all counterpoint is polyphonic but not all polyphony is contrapuntal). Contrapuntal polyphony emerged in the baroque era and so renaissance polyphony is not referred to as counterpoint.
Jun
9
comment What is this called? Why is it allowed?
+1 great answer!
Jun
9
comment Why do the Canadian and American ways of writing chords symbols differ?
with the edit, I think you've explained this brilliantly
Jun
9
comment What technique is it called in the song “Better Man” by Robbie William?
@Phelios yes, you could call it modulation, although most modulation involves the whole transition from one tonal centre to another and in the case of this song, it's an instant jump
Jun
9
comment Why do the Canadian and American ways of writing chords symbols differ?
As an Australian with both English and American theory textbooks, I've never seen those two progressions as being two different names for the same thing. I6/4 vs Ic maybe, but not V6/4.
Jun
5
comment Non-fixed-frequency instruments playing by themselves versus with fixed-frequency instruments
Yeah, I was deliberately using trombone/strings on the one hand and piano on the other and bypassing valve-brass and wind instruments (although I knew they adjust intonation with embouchure. Per my other question, it would be interesting though if there is a measurable frequency difference in recordings of, say, a string quartet versus a piano trio; or a brass ensemble as opposed to Hindemith's trombone sonata.
Jun
5
comment Evidence of Just Intonation in Recordings with Non-fixed-frequency Instruments
very interesting; let me ask another question rather than continue to chat here (as I want to know more!)
Jun
5
comment Evidence of Just Intonation in Recordings with Non-fixed-frequency Instruments
I'll check out the Chrysalid Requiem but what I'm more interested in is academic research into whether (as is often stated anecdotally) string players will naturally tend towards just intonation without even being aware they are doing so.
Jun
4
comment Equivalent Key Signatures
I always anecdotally thought string players preferred sharps. Not sure where I picked up that impression, though.
Jun
4
comment Equivalent Key Signatures
Modulation is the process of changing the key within a piece (e.g. from the tonic to the dominant). See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulation_(music) for a lot more information.
Jun
4
comment Examples of songs or phrases played in different temperaments
@rshallit I'll ask it now
Jun
4
comment Examples of songs or phrases played in different temperaments
I wonder the extent to which string quartets or a cappella choirs are non-ET. They are often cited as examples of the tendency towards just intonation when not using fixed-frequency instruments but I'd be interested to know if that's demonstrably true in certain recordings, etc.