229 reputation
18
bio website
location
age 17
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 2 days ago

Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
@Tim Is this a response to me or to Kirk A? (To send others a notification of your comment, use an @ symbol and type username without spaces. This will make it clear to whom your are talking as well.)
Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
@KirkA Sorry, I did not state this clearly in my answer. There is a rule, saying that the lowest note determines the inversion. (Look at the last sentence of the first paragraph and the entire last paragraph of my answer.)
Jun
19
revised How to determine which inversion a chord is?
added 857 characters in body
Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
@Tim Exactly, that is what I tried to say in my answer.
Jun
19
awarded  Editor
Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
@SasukeWang Better?
Jun
19
revised How to determine which inversion a chord is?
added 857 characters in body
Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
What do you want to know? @SasukeWang
Jun
19
answered How to determine which inversion a chord is?
Jun
19
comment Question about soloing
Thank you, yes. Talking about musical theory in a different language than the one you learnt it in is quite tricky. @JoshuaTaylor
Jun
19
comment Question about soloing
It depends on the temperature. But even if you play in equal temperature the function is still different (and if you are playing an instrument on which you can intonate - like the guitar - you may choose to adjust, because equal temperature is slightly off pitch.)
Jun
19
comment Question about soloing
What is a 'b5'? A lowered fifth? In case that's what you meant, a G# in D Major is actually a #4 (following the assumed notation - a fourth with a sharp). If that's not what you meant, could you explain that? Otherwise, +1.
Jun
11
comment What is the origin of the up bow and down bow symbols for bowed string instruments?
The V is for the French word "Vileine" (not sure about the spelling), because up bow naturally sounds less nice (nowadays, people tend to practice until up and down sounds equal). There is a symbol with a French origin for down bow as well.
May
30
comment Has music notation become more prescriptive?
(+1) There are some outliers though. Not so extreme as jazz or renaissance music, but for example Canto Ostinato by S. ten Holt is quite anti-prescriptive. (Anti used on purpose. Ten Holt opposed prescriptivity in music (to some degree) according to the preface in my copy.)
May
25
comment Why is music theory built so tightly around the C Major scale?
The circle of fifths is really simple. Just go a fifth up (or a fourth down) and your at the next note in the circle of fifths. No memorisation whatsoever.
May
25
comment Why is music theory built so tightly around the C Major scale?
Concerning the memorisation of point 3: here's a handy trick. (Works only for tonal music.) When dealing with flats at the key, the last flat is a fourth up from the key note (I bet this is called differently - I don't talk about musical theory in English very often -, but I mean the note the key is named after). (So if you have two or more flats, the second from the right is the key note.) Sharps: the last sharp is a major seventh above the key note (minor second down, obviously). This saves you from memorising a poem. I need another comment for the circle of fifths.
May
15
comment What's so off about the intro to Prokofiev's Dance of the Knights?
I must say, Gergiev isn't doing very well. His hands are severely shaking and some parts he falls behind. This may have caused the rather clumsy beginning.
Apr
28
comment Why is music for strings more likely to be in keys with sharps?
@KyleStrand I think we agree, it's just my English.
Apr
28
comment Why is music for strings more likely to be in keys with sharps?
@KyleStrand I knew it isn't an instrument but a system, I just wasn't sure how to formulate that. Indeed, when both enharmonic they are the same, but a situation where two notes with the same function are notated differently should be quite unusual. (Perhaps not nowadays, since the 20th century rules for notation are treated looser and looser.)
Apr
28
comment Why is music for strings more likely to be in keys with sharps?
The differences are minimal though.