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Apr
20
comment Where is the manuscript of Escenas Romanticas by Granados?
@BobBroadley Of course, the publisher must have had access to the manuscript! Thank you. It also is an interesting suggestion to ask on MusicFans.SE, though I am looking for the manuscript in the capacity of a pianist, not of a fan.
Apr
4
comment Did baroque composers expect you to “bring out” the voices in their pieces, the way today's critics seem to enjoy in players?
@Josiah Only basso continuo wasn't written out, generally. Other parts always were. (And mostly a basso continuo isn't just on his own, save recitatives.) And as for the filler part: I know someone who can improvise fugues, so in Baroque, when classical improvisation was more common so - I hope - more developed, people were quite capable of improvising inner voices
Apr
4
comment What interval do all the modes have in common?
Welcome to music.SE! I noticed both your questions here have only one tag and I find it hard to establish the right context. I assume you want information on improvisation in some non-classical style, but tagging a bit more extensively will not only help me (and other users) understand your question, it will also help you get your question in front of a bigger audience (and hence be more likely to get answered).
Apr
3
comment Why are conductors required at orchestra performances?
@SomeDudeOnTheInterwebs I joked about on this (please look at the edit history). In hindsight, I can see why someone would take offence, but it's a debate I hardly ever have to deal with in my offline environment, so I may not be the best judge.
Apr
3
comment Why are conductors required at orchestra performances?
Better? @djechlin
Apr
3
comment Why are conductors required at orchestra performances?
Sorry, it was meant as a joke but I now realise it's rather inappropriate. At the time it seemed funny given the conductor/conductress ratio. @djechlin
Apr
3
comment Why are conductors required at orchestra performances?
Wow, that's quite a bit more than I thought! I thought there were maybe ten or so. My sources are probably a bit dated. Let me update. @topomorto
Feb
21
comment Appreciating the music of J. S. Bach
The most final stage of Bach's composing is without any doubt his last version of "Vor deinem Thron tret ich", since he dictated it from his deathbed. It was the last piece he ever composed.
Dec
21
comment Rest above a note in a piano piece
Just not Notenbüchlein. Thank you!
Dec
21
comment Variation of Chopin's Mazurka Op. 68 no. 4 in F minor
FYI: Chopin produced countless versions of most of his music. Both slight differences (e.g. a missing or different ornament) and more substantial differences (e.g. pp versus con forza - on the main coloratura in the nocturne in D flat major) exist. This was due to the fact that he sent his music to multiple publishers at different times and sometimes gave his pupils slightly edited copies.
Dec
21
comment Rest above a note in a piano piece
Apparently, it isn't. Now I'm curious. What piece is this measure from?
Dec
21
comment Rest above a note in a piano piece
J. S. Bach, Notenbüchlein für Anna Magdalena Bach?
Oct
2
comment Does a diminished first exist?
Hm, good point. Apart from that I should not have overlooked the harmonic scale.@leftaroundabout (I assume you mean Bach's cello suites.)
Oct
1
comment Does a diminished first exist?
@leftaroundabout enharmonic equivalents, yes, or in extremely rare cases. My point is that while it may sound fine (and be used as stated above), chords with both flats and sharps cannot be named in a major, minor, or modal scale. The first use of a scale with both is probably in jazz or atonal music (don't know who was first), about 300 years after the end of the Baroque.
Oct
1
comment Does a diminished first exist?
The example chord you gave cannot exist in classical music theory; it contains a flat along with a sharp, which is impossible in most music (AFAIK only jazz music has scales impossible to notate without using both sharps and flats).
Sep
14
comment In “All we like sheep have gone astray,” are we laughing with Handel or at him?
@MeaningfulUsername I disagree. Interpretation of both melody and text is a vital part of making music.
Sep
14
comment Piano performance: slippery keys due to sweat of previous players
I just want to add that it is completely normal for a stagehand to wipe the keys. I've seen it happen many times during professional performances (with world-famous pianists).
Aug
22
comment When to use a dot or a tie in music notation?
I disagree with calling it a rule, because it simply isn't. It's just that it's usually easier to read if you use a tie - so coincidentally, a pattern emerged, not a rule -, but some rhythms are really a lot more readable with dots than ties even if off-beat. Example: 4 notes in a 3/4 measure. I'd notate that with dots, not ties, because with dots, it is very clear all notes are of the same length, with ties not at all.
Jul
18
comment Why does the orchestra tune to the oboe?
I read the answer carefully, I just thought it wasn't obvious there was more to it than just habit. I agree with your answer, but I think the stability of the oboe deserved some more attention.
Jul
17
comment Why does the orchestra tune to the oboe?
To me, only the oboes graph looks like a wave. But I am not a physicist.