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seen Oct 2 at 6:36

Oct
2
comment Does a diminished first exist?
Hm, good point. Apart from that I should not have overlooked the harmonic scale.@leftaroundabout (I assume you mean Bach's cello suites.)
Oct
1
comment Does a diminished first exist?
@leftaroundabout enharmonic equivalents, yes, or in extremely rare cases. My point is that while it may sound fine (and be used as stated above), chords with both flats and sharps cannot be named in a major, minor, or modal scale. The first use of a scale with both is probably in jazz or atonal music (don't know who was first), about 300 years after the end of the Baroque.
Oct
1
comment Does a diminished first exist?
The example chord you gave cannot exist in classical music theory; it contains a flat along with a sharp, which is impossible in most music (AFAIK only jazz music has scales impossible to notate without using both sharps and flats).
Sep
14
comment In “All we like sheep have gone astray,” are we laughing with Handel or at him?
@MeaningfulUsername I disagree. Interpretation of both melody and text is a vital part of making music.
Sep
14
comment Piano performance: slippery keys due to sweat of previous players
I just want to add that it is completely normal for a stagehand to wipe the keys. I've seen it happen many times during professional performances (with world-famous pianists).
Aug
22
comment When to use a dot or a tie in music notation?
I disagree with calling it a rule, because it simply isn't. It's just that it's usually easier to read if you use a tie - so coincidentally, a pattern emerged, not a rule -, but some rhythms are really a lot more readable with dots than ties even if off-beat. Example: 4 notes in a 3/4 measure. I'd notate that with dots, not ties, because with dots, it is very clear all notes are of the same length, with ties not at all.
Jul
18
comment Why does the orchestra tune to the oboe?
I read the answer carefully, I just thought it wasn't obvious there was more to it than just habit. I agree with your answer, but I think the stability of the oboe deserved some more attention.
Jul
17
comment Why does the orchestra tune to the oboe?
To me, only the oboes graph looks like a wave. But I am not a physicist.
Jul
17
comment Why does the orchestra tune to the oboe?
Not only a habit! The oboe's tuning is very stable, by this I mean that it doesn't change so quick as that of most other orchestra instruments because of heat/cold/moisturity/dryness. (This is already in the quote you gave, but I thought it hadn't gotten enough attention.)
Jul
17
comment Why does the orchestra tune to the oboe?
Then what is the instrument that is in most orchestras with the simplest waveform? This answer is part of what I heard (from my parents who both are professional musicians and play in orchestras). @JCPedroza
Jul
17
comment Why does the orchestra tune to the oboe?
This tiny sample does not prove that. The answer says that an experienced oboist is able to produce one, not that an oboe always does. I would argue that, when playing (and not tuning), an oboist would try to create a more complex sound than a sine wave, because a sine wave isn't really the most beautiful sound. But even if the answer is incorrect, the waveform of an oboe is still a lot simpler than that of most instruments (compare to the waveform produced by a piano), which would still support the conclusion of the answer. @JCPedroza
Jul
3
comment Do power chords have some kind of function/meaning?
A major fifth does not exist. Fifths and octaves can't be major or minor (so fourths and primes neither).
Jul
3
comment If Für Elise is in Am why there is a D# in it?
D♯ is not a flat 5 in A minor. It is a sharp 4.
Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
Yeah, I noticed some strange behavior on StackOverflow as well (getting notified for comments I should not be notified of).
Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
@Tim Is this a response to me or to Kirk A? (To send others a notification of your comment, use an @ symbol and type username without spaces. This will make it clear to whom your are talking as well.)
Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
@KirkA Sorry, I did not state this clearly in my answer. There is a rule, saying that the lowest note determines the inversion. (Look at the last sentence of the first paragraph and the entire last paragraph of my answer.)
Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
@Tim Exactly, that is what I tried to say in my answer.
Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
@SasukeWang Better?
Jun
19
comment How to determine which inversion a chord is?
What do you want to know? @SasukeWang
Jun
19
comment Question about soloing
Thank you, yes. Talking about musical theory in a different language than the one you learnt it in is quite tricky. @JoshuaTaylor