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seen Apr 13 at 12:41

Mar
22
comment Is it possible to differentiate Major scale and Minor scale by ear?
I am not sure, perhaps it was just the terminology that "scared them off", as I think they were quite musical. Anyway, it isn't as straightforward as above comments suggest. @Christian
Mar
22
comment Is it possible to differentiate Major scale and Minor scale by ear?
@keshlam I can only notify one user per comment, please read my comment above.
Mar
22
comment Is it possible to differentiate Major scale and Minor scale by ear?
I have been able to distinguish major and minor scales instinctively as long as I can remember, but I know that some people somehow find this very difficult. (no, not only beginners. These people were singing western music daily.) @Christian
Mar
20
comment Which fingering to use when playing the same piano key twice in a row?
@KyleStrand comment 1: interesting. I didn't know. Comment 2: I oversimplified there. You're right.
Mar
19
comment Which fingering to use when playing the same piano key twice in a row?
Note: fingerings are usually not by the composer, but by a pianist hired by the editor. (Though perhaps the Czerny fingerings are authentic, because no credit is given for the fingerings in my edition.) Note as well that fingerings are quite personal, though in some cases (like the case you are asking about) there is a definitive fingering: the one described in BobRodes' answer.
Mar
9
comment Why do we use so complicated notation?
I disagree that standard notation is complicated. Compared to natural languages it is almost ridiculously simple. What makes it complicated is what is not there, i.e. interpretation stuff. What is written is unambiguous and sequential. You don't need to read ahead to understand what is written. (Though it is certainly necessary for 'interpretation stuff'.)
Mar
5
comment Ten minute piano practice techniques?
The most "correct" answer is of course: scales.
Jan
4
comment Can anyone learn to sing?
There was some research into the voice of Paverotti. The conclusion was that why he had such a wonderful voice wasn't because he was physiologically different from me or you (unless either one of us has some kind of handicap I don't know of).
Dec
8
comment General questions about piano sheet music notation
No, they are relative to a whole note. A 4/4 signature happens to be exactly as long (since 4/4 = 1). Your statement could be rewritten "note durations are relative to x/x" (of course x equals itself). Relative to a whole note doesn't mean relative to a signature that just happens to be long enough to contain it and short enough to not need rests.
Dec
7
comment Tempo:Mendelssohn's Song without Words, op.53. No. 3
And indeed, a single f is less than what is played in th video.
Dec
7
comment Tempo:Mendelssohn's Song without Words, op.53. No. 3
I would interpret that as arpeggiation with rhythm, not like slow and lyrical chords because of the tempo, the f and sf and the staccato points on the last notes of every broken chord.
Dec
7
comment Tempo:Mendelssohn's Song without Words, op.53. No. 3
Partly because melody and accompaniment are played equally loud, while normally one would play the accompaniment softer than the melody. And I don't have the sheet music at hand, but the man in the video in the OP seems to apply excessive force to the keyboard.
Dec
7
comment What are some common beginner mistakes when learning to play the piano?
The last sentence is invaluable in itself. Perhaps the OP knew this already, but it is something that should be somewhere on this site.
Dec
7
comment General questions about piano sheet music notation
I disagree with the relativity to the 4/4 signature. I was told it has a historical basis: in early music, most pieces had an x/1 signature. Over time (we are talking centuries here) it became x/4, but the names of the notes didn't evolve along.
Dec
7
comment General questions about piano sheet music notation
Good answer, though one omission and one error (sorry it sounds rude). The D is not necessarily the central note, as two sharps means D major or b minor. Now the error: on a piano, legato has nothing to do with pressing gently and softening the attack. Every now and then it reads ff at the beginning of a giant slur, and Beethoven (for example) has the habit of placing sfs under slurs. On a piano one should release the first note shortly after one starts the second. This is often taught later on because it leads to 'gluey' play if not played well.
Dec
7
comment How to add verse-specific dynamic to sheet music
I have seen 'seconda volta' often enough.I'm not Italian but could read it. If I hadn't been able to read it I had consulted my invaluable book 'strange words in music', a book every musician should own (or an equivalent). I am sure I would have found it in there.
Dec
7
comment Tempo:Mendelssohn's Song without Words, op.53. No. 3
If the title of the YouTube video you linked to is right it is 'presto agitato', which means incredibly fast as if you are in a hurry, loosely translated. The melody is in the left hand and is relatively slow, so the musicality of the melody is not lost if you play it fast, playing the accompanying broken chords though is kind of boring if you play it slowly.
Dec
6
comment How much do we know about how ancient Greek and Roman music sounded?
I talked about this a few days ago. We agreed they used hexachords and the modi, though not with absolute certainty.
Dec
6
comment Do instruments get out of tune when you place them near a radiator?
There is a subtlety I'd like to add: not the radiator but the difference in temperature is messing with your instrument. In a tropical country, most instruments are fine as well, but then they will suffer from a trip to Scandinavia.
Dec
4
comment Why is the aeolian mode the minor scale?
@Dom: It's the other way around: the major scale (Ionian) is a derivative of the other modes, by a late Renaissance banker called Glareanus.