341 reputation
26
bio website john.werner-ny.net
location Fairport, NY
age 47
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Jun 23 at 13:08

John Werner is an internationally published author, engineer, and conference speaker who brings over 15 years of experience solving technical problems with creative solutions.

As a Senior Software Engineer, John has used his unique problem solving abilities to become an expert in solving problems that have escaped others.

As an author and editor, John has written a regular column for an automotive magazine and has been published both in the US and Europe. In his spare time, he edits the Internet's Oldest FAQ on Snow Tires and Winter Driving.

As an inventor and architect, John has earned patents for inventions ranging from Ink Jet Printers to Automotive Ignition Systems; and he has both published and presented his software architecture work.

As a software process evangelist, John has motivated corporate cultures to embrace sound development practices such as Test Driven Development, Continuous Integration, Unit Testing, and Continuous Code Review while seeking to provide a careful balance between process and productivity.

The world of Embedded Software Security has not escaped his focus. His work in driving the security analysis of embedded products; developing an innovative, risk-based approach to Threat Modeling; and creating a cross-platform tool for analyzing, organizing, and reporting the results was lauded by corporate research.

International work has been a part of John's career for the past decade. During that time, John has gained experience working both for and with off-shore development efforts and serving both in the roles of team player and team leader. He has traveled extensively to Munich, Germany, and Milan, Italy; and has also worked in Bangalore, India, and Stuttgart, Germany.


Feb
18
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
11
answered English Horn Etymology
Jan
4
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
6
comment How can I move beyond learning songs?
Great answer, but I would add a couple of things in terms of Ear Training. The first is to learn the style of music. When I first started in a Gospel Choir that didn't use music, it took me a while to get an ear for how the Gospel harmonies are put together. (I come from a strict classical music upbringing.) The second is to transition from see->finger->play->hear to hear->finger->play. A musician with good ear-training can hear a note and then just finger the note without having to first think about what note it is.
May
6
awarded  Yearling
Sep
28
answered Techniques to improve general ability to play fast runs on a tuba?
Aug
19
comment How is counterpoint different from harmony?
Counterpoint is one of the reasons I have always enjoyed playing Bach. The 2nd part is not secondary and just harmony with the 1st part. It stands on its own and often crosses the 1st part, making is fun to play.
Aug
5
answered Should pedals be used when playing classical piano music?
Jul
27
awarded  Editor
Jul
27
revised Deciphering the series of numbers shown for songs in a hymn book
Incorporated correct name for the note progressions.
Jul
27
comment Deciphering the series of numbers shown for songs in a hymn book
@KeithS I knew there was a better name. I just couldn't seem to find / recall it. Thanks.
Jul
26
awarded  Teacher
Jul
26
comment What is the importance of tempo and time-signatures?
6/8 can be done either as ONE two three FOUR five six or ONE two THREE four FIVE six, depending how the composer chooses to use it. In some pieces, the two may both be used for the same measure in different parts to create a hemiola effect. (Paul Creston's setting of Psalm XXIII is a great example of this.)
Jul
26
answered Deciphering the series of numbers shown for songs in a hymn book
Jul
22
answered What is the benefit of soaking double reeds in water?
May
10
awarded  Supporter
May
10
comment What does a conductor actually do?
The conductor is most often the only person who can see all of the parts that are being played. Normally, the musicians in an orchestra only have their own parts and a few queues some editor thought might possibly be useful (but usually aren't). Thus it is usually only the conductor who can get the orchestra back together should something goes wrong (like the featured guest soloist forgetting to repeat a section during the performance and instead inserting a new cadenza).
May
6
awarded  Autobiographer