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Jun
17
comment “Andalusian cadences”: How are they commonly heard?
And let's not forget @Andrew's comment beneath the question; that's a good point, too.
Jun
17
comment “Andalusian cadences”: How are they commonly heard?
You said that the music could easily stop on the i chord without strangeness; could it just as well stop on the V? If not, then you're implying that the Andalusian cadence is really just a perfect cadence. But I could imagine the song ending just as easily on the V, which is why I'm hesitant to say for sure which kind of cadence it really is. (Oh, well. Sorry for the long string of comments; you can only submit a couple hundred characters at a time.)
Jun
17
comment “Andalusian cadences”: How are they commonly heard?
If you can offer a straightforward answer as to whether the Andalusian cadence is a perfect cadence or a half cadence, then feel free to submit it as an alternative to my answer. I can't see that it is very straightforward, but that's just my take on it. I'm not saying that the chords themselves are complex or difficult to understand, but rather that the cadences are elided one after another in a way that nearly (or perhaps completely) erases the seams between cadences.
Jun
16
comment “Andalusian cadences”: How are they commonly heard?
You said that musical satisfaction in a cadence is evidence of completeness; what did you mean by "completeness"? That a cadence is "complete" if it resolves dissonances? Or that a cadence is "complete" if it fulfills its structural role? In my answer, I used "completeness" to mean the resolution of dissonances; perhaps that was the wrong word to use. But the way you used "completeness" in your last comment isn't the way I used the word. By your usage, "complete" must mean that a chord fulfills its structural role; in which case it would be right to equate completion with musical satisfaction.
Jun
15
comment “Andalusian cadences”: How are they commonly heard?
It appears that you read neither the question nor my answer. The question was not what the CHORDS were, but what the CADENCE was. We can all agree that "the progression moves diatonically stepwise to a V chord at which point it turns around to i." What we don't all agree on is whether (as the questioner asked) the cadence is a perfect cadence or a half cadence. I have indicated in my response that there's not a straightforward answer because of the fact that the momentum of the cadence drives us forward even after we have reached the i chord. Please re-read the question and response.
Jan
2
comment Chord Leading Question
Thanks! Glad I could help!
Jan
1
answered Chord Leading Question
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