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Jul
7
comment What will be the best choice for an electric guitar for an intermediate player?
Hello Sayan, welcome! Per the FAQ, recommendations on equipment is discouraged as it is primarily opinion-based, too broad in scope, but too specific to the original poster to be of future use to others. If you can edit the question to be more general and help others, I'm sure an answer will come along.
Jul
6
comment Why does my voice crack while I'm singing and how do I prevent it?
Agreed, this is a pretty general problem. Off the cuff thoughts: drink more water + always properly warmup / warmdown + sing music comfortable for your range
Jul
6
comment Is classical singing with self-accompaniment ok?
@Josiah That sounds fantastic; you managed to get me excited about Wagner, which hasn't happened in some time. I also agree with Somedude; see my other comment. :)
Jul
6
comment Is classical singing with self-accompaniment ok?
@SomeDudeOnTheInterwebs Oh, I agree completely; they are morons until they are not. I'm absolutely not saying a child shouldn't have structure / guidance, I was merely making the point that adults should not live through their kids and/or impose needless aspirations on them. Children need substantial amounts of structure, but you have to make sure you're giving them the right kind of structure.
Jul
6
answered What is the Lydian Chromatic Concept?
Jul
6
comment Advice: 'Real' Musical Ability?
You are missing your heart. What do you feel? You didn't once mention what music makes you feel. If you cannot play it without looking at it, you don't know it in your heart. If you don't know it in your heart, you can't really feel it. If you can't feel it, you can't connect to it. If you can't connect to it, how is a listener going to?
Jul
6
reviewed Approve Advice: 'Real' Musical Ability?
Jul
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
5
comment When composing for oboe, how useful is it to think about recorder fingerings?
@leftaroundabout For microtones / multiphonics, I would definitely consult live players. Different instruments respond differently and you'll want to hear / see what's happening. Few things anger players more than when a composer reads something in a book and puts it in a piece without actually knowing what it is / how it works. Specifically for oboe, microtones will be easier if they're lipped and in the upper registers.
Jul
5
revised When composing for oboe, how useful is it to think about recorder fingerings?
corrected incorrect information
Jul
5
comment When composing for oboe, how useful is it to think about recorder fingerings?
@leftaroundabout - Sincerest apologies - in my head I was thinking alto recorder and wrote tenor. The best way to find the answer to your question is to have the music played on both oboe and tenor recorder and see how each responds. Most orchestration books have fingering charts in the back or found online. The Alfred Blatter orchestration resource I mentioned is great because it shows dynamic envelopes for each of the instruments, which is very helpful. My answer was written with the idea of teaching a man to fish, not giving him one; this is why my answer is not specific to oboe.
Jul
5
answered When composing for oboe, how useful is it to think about recorder fingerings?
Jul
5
comment Is classical singing with self-accompaniment ok?
Agreed with SomeDude here - the child is young - let them make music and enjoy it for the sake of enjoying it and experience what they must. Goals are good, but there is a fine line between your goals and your child's goals. The goals in this question are not those of your child, but yours. Is your child interested in both? What are your child's goals? If your child wants to do both at the same time, great. If they want to do a funk arrangement of the piece, great. If they want to scat over the original music, great. They are only limited by their imagination and your presupposed goals.
Jul
4
comment B -> C and E -> F, No Sharp?
@DrMayhem He's talking about microtonal notation -> microtonaltrumpet.com/downloads/Basics-1.pdf see pages 2 and 3
Jun
27
comment what is the correct musical term for arpeggios where the notes are left ringing?
Can also be notated with short ties to empty, open space, with a specific duration of time (e.g. 4 seconds), and / or if the instrument has a pedal (piano, vibraphone, tubular chimes) a pedal indication may also be used.
Jun
27
comment Are there any situations when one needs to make a distinction between slurs and ties?
All of this is incorrect. I don't think you understand what ties or slurs are. You should revisit your knowledge of this subject.
Jun
27
comment Are there any situations when one needs to make a distinction between slurs and ties?
Not really correct here. A half-note tied to a quarter can easily be represented by a dotted-half, but there are many reasons to notate the music the former. Also, slurs indicate smooth things for some instruments and circumstances, but not all instruments and circumstances.
Jun
27
comment Are there any situations when one needs to make a distinction between slurs and ties?
@CarlWitthoft Well, a slur covering the same pitch is fine and normal. You said that ties can indicate phrasing, which they cannot.
Jun
27
comment Are there any situations when one needs to make a distinction between slurs and ties?
@CarlWitthoft I've never heard of a tie being used to indicate phrasing. A tie simply joins two notes, nothing more.
Jun
27
comment Are there any situations when one needs to make a distinction between slurs and ties?
@Speldosa Agreed with alephzero here. A slur with two notes of the same pitch signals a string player to many several notes in one bow direction. When tenuto markings, this is called louré bowing, with staccato, it's called slurred staccato. For wind instruments, it indicates several notes to be played with breath attack - no tongue articulation. Slurs are also thicker than ties and reach to the center of the notehead. Ties are thin and flat and begin slightly away from the interior part of the notehead. Musicians distinguish them all the time.