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I am a composer!


Apr
9
comment Book about development of music
Technically speaking, The Study of Counterpoint is an 18th century book that teaches methods for interesting linear contours and historically "appropriate" techniques for handling dissonance. Counterpoint is a technique within composition, not composition itself. Obsession with vertical harmony doesn't really develop until the mid-late Classic period.
Apr
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
9
answered Book about development of music
Apr
7
comment Correct notation for a minor chord?
@PeterOlson - dubious and a hoax perhaps; I thought it more appropriate (and family friendly) an analogy than perhaps American slang for women.
Apr
7
answered Correct notation for a minor chord?
Apr
7
comment Can anyone achieve absolute pitch?
Good answer, good content, and I agree with a lot of your thoughts. Hearing is very underdeveloped in the US, and it is not surprising that there are no standardized techniques for AP as there are for RP.
Apr
4
comment Chord analysis: b13 or #5
@NReilingh - If I were writing a jazz tune, I wouldn't write the chord with a b6 for the same reason you outlined. That said, it should be noted that it was never explicitly stated that we were talking about jazz - it merely appeared that way given the context of the OP's question. My comments about "compelling reasons" and nomenclature are intended for a broader interpretation of the question, which I thought was fair given ambiguity of the question.
Apr
4
comment How does a flutist maintain a grip on the flute when the stops are open?
A responsible textbook answer, but what about when you hold the flute away from your face? I was always taught that you only needed to fingers to hold a flute: the right pinky and the left thumb.
Apr
4
comment Chord analysis: b13 or #5
@microtherion - Tim means that if the G is considered a 13th, it should rightfully be on top of the chord, which it is not.
Apr
4
comment Chord analysis: b13 or #5
@MeaningfulUsername - how / why would you ever interpret "G" as a fifth above "B"? It is always a sixth (a minor one in this case.)
Apr
3
answered Chord analysis: b13 or #5
Apr
2
comment C#m in Am chord progression
@Spring - it would be less interesting. Interest is derived from contrast. If you only had an A minor triad / key sounding for ten minutes, it might get monotonous.
Apr
1
comment C#m in Am chord progression
@Spring - A "V4/2" is a third inversion dominant 7th chord. The figured bass for it would be 4/2 (read: "four-two") thus illustrating the order of notes in the chord from lowest to highest - or at least what's in the bass.
Apr
1
comment C#m in Am chord progression
@TimSeguine - Nope! You've only got two possibilities. Using this example, those would be F# or C#. Any sort of proper analysis has special notation used to designate key changes, so it's unnecessary to try and qualify it as a "major chromatic mediant".
Apr
1
awarded  theory
Apr
1
comment what is the difference between writing and pronouncing of notes?
Methinks there needs to be more clarification with this question.
Apr
1
comment C#m in Am chord progression
@Spring - "Non-diatonic" means "isn't a part of the original scale". For example, A -> C in A minor is a diatonic third. A -> C# in A minor is not a diatonic third as C# doesn't occur in A minor. Therefore, it's a non-diatonic third. Chromatic Mediants refer to non-diatonic third relationships. Mediants refer to diatonic third relationships.
Mar
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
31
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Should you shape your voice consciously or try to find a natural voice?
Mar
31
comment C#m in Am chord progression
@Dom - functionally, this explanation really only works if the C# is being used as an approach note to a V4/2 in A minor.