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Dec
5
answered What is the term for this - not vibrato, or tremolo
Dec
5
answered How to prepare for a music major?
Dec
5
comment Four chords in chord progression. How to choose the fourth chord?
@ToddWilcox I understand. My issue is not with whether or not the charts are comprehensive, but that they are omitting some basic, coherent, factually accurate information. I made my comment because I felt the charts took away from Rockin's answer. I'm all for visuals, but we need to make sure we use / show the best information available, not merely what may be convenient.
Dec
1
comment Four chords in chord progression. How to choose the fourth chord?
@RockinCowboy - With due respect, your pictures / graphs are quite silly; the tension -> resolution ladder is quite incorrect: there is no way a "iii" chord is to be considered a "tense" chord. In your chord progression graph, it illustrates that IV cannot go to "vi", which is insane, since that movement offers incredibly smooth voice-leading and is actually very common to hear in music. It doesn't show how "ii" can substitute IV or how "vi" can substitute I, and omits the seven-diminished chord entirely. Apart from showing some major scales, the matrix you provide seems to be incoherent.
Dec
1
comment Four chords in chord progression. How to choose the fourth chord?
No problem. For what it's worth, in your defense, people typically don't read roman numeral analysis "live" unless they are sight-reading figured bass realizations in a Baroque ensemble. If you're playing in a rock band, I'd suggest just putting pop chord symbols in and not worrying about showing the functional harmony.
Nov
30
comment Four chords in chord progression. How to choose the fourth chord?
Thanks for explaining how you interpreted the OP's question about the "fourth chord", I obviously took it to mean the fourth chord of a sequence. Regarding Sweet Georgia Brown, if the chords are functioning as secondary dominants, then yes, V/V/V or V/V/V/V would be absolutely right, even if it seems silly / stupid. I've analyzed Beethoven string quartets that had a similar train of secondary leading-tone chords, as well as non-functional secondary dominants (such a rebel!). Yes, you'll feel stupid writing that many "V's", but it's correct. :)
Nov
29
comment What is the technique called where you hold a crash cymbal while hitting it?
@TimHargreaves Todd Wilcox is correct here - the technique is called a choke and can be performed on any type of cymbal. You can specify where you would like the percussionist to choke (bell, center, edge) as well as what kind of beater to use (stick, yarn, cotton, etc). The addition of the bass drum kick is optional, but highly favored - it is more of a performance practice than a written convention. It could be that the particular beater / cymbal / drum / performance combination gives you the sound you're looking for. Easiest thing to do would be to email the drummer and ask for a recording.
Nov
29
comment Four chords in chord progression. How to choose the fourth chord?
To clean up some of your points concerning music theory - the dominant of a key is the V chord, not a II, which would be a V/V a.k.a a secondary dominant. You would never label a "I" chord as a "I7", but rather a V7/IV - you need to show functional relationship when present. You're correct on both counts about three-chord songs, but you miss the mark in answering the OP's question. In a four-chord progression, the last chord is very, very typically going to be a IV, V, or secondary dominant. Use of a "vi" or "ii" typically serve as substitutions of I, IV, and V to prolong the middle.
Nov
25
comment What is the study of song structure called?
I cannot tell if you are serious...
Nov
25
comment What is the study of song structure called?
"Ethnomusicology" typically focuses on non-musical aspects of music that influence the music. The OP is looking for song structure, specifically.
Nov
24
answered What is the study of song structure called?
Nov
23
comment Does absolute pitch always cover the all musical sound range?
Musicians tend to have a much higher accuracy naming notes that are played by their primary instrument. For example, if I were a flutist, it would be easier for me to develop "perfect pitch" naming the flute's notes and/or hearing notes played in the flute's range.
Nov
22
comment I play bass and want more from myself & my instrument
Easy, three steps: 1.) ALWAYS show up on time. 2.) ALWAYS know your music. 3.) ALWAYS be as professional as possible. You're a bassist, you don't need to be flashy, but you do need to be a solid foundation - as a colleague and as a musician.
Nov
20
comment I've booked my first ever singing lesson - what should I do in preparation?
For a first lesson a teacher will not expect you to do anything. Every lesson after, your teacher will expect you to prepare / do what they asked you to do. When it comes to private lessons, think of musicians as like doctors - we've seen / heard it all before, so, you really can't overwhelm / surprise us. Also, you're paying us to help you improve, so it's not like we're going to make fun of you (nor would we even if you weren't paying us). Also remember that your singing doesn't reflect who you are as a person - an undeveloped voice is just an undeveloped voice. Be open to the experience.
Nov
20
awarded  voice
Nov
17
comment Learning Classical Style Acoustic Guitar
Also, I'd starting growing your fingernails. Well, I mean, technically I can't grow your fingernails...but, you'd want to start letting your own fingernails grow out.
Nov
14
comment Tonicisation of Secondary Dominant in D Minor
@dwoz - Please, please enlighten me. I would very much like to see examples / links to resources.
Nov
14
comment Tonicisation of Secondary Dominant in D Minor
@DylanMallia You'd write it as "V/V" (Five of Five): D->A->E | a dominant of a dominant. You're basically correct. Tonicization only occurs from a few beats to a measure or two at most before wandering back to the original key. If it stayed in the new key, it would be called a modulation. After you resolve the new dominant, it is wise to use a pivot chord that will let you smoothly head back to your original key.
Nov
14
comment Tonicisation of Secondary Dominant in D Minor
Possible duplicate of: music.stackexchange.com/questions/22057/…
Nov
14
comment Tonicisation of Secondary Dominant in D Minor
Thanks for the image. I don't think you misinterpreted the text, I think you just extended your interpretation beyond the text a bit. The book says that you are welcome to substitute dominants with secondary leading tone chords when you want the same inherent function, but with a weaker sense of dominance. When composers use them, it is for this purpose; this subtlety is not to be taken lightly. Also remember that fully diminished chords are perfectly invertable; they can resolve four different ways; something that a dominant chord cannot do.