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I am a composer!


Feb
22
comment How can i improve my intonation on violin?
@DeusDeceit - No need to be defensive, I was only trying to clarify your confusion as to why a violin has a fingerboard and a guitar a fretboard.
Feb
22
comment How can i improve my intonation on violin?
How slowly do you practice? If you constantly practice excruciatingly slow, you will develop a very good sense of spacing / proportion. Thus, your fingers will be sure and intonation will improve.
Feb
22
comment How can i improve my intonation on violin?
Technically speaking, on a guitar, it's called a "fretboard" and on the violin (et. al) it's called a "fingerboard". The distinction should be obvious.
Feb
22
comment Changing from bass to saxophone
Thanks Rockin' - just trying to keep things in perspective.
Feb
22
revised Changing from bass to saxophone
re-instated text that provides necessary contextual information relevent to accepted answer
Feb
21
answered Changing from bass to saxophone
Feb
21
comment How do I make drums sound satisfying in a room without soundproofing?
To go along with Mayhem's answer, unless you're recording in that space, I wouldn't worry too much. Worry about the drum sound for recording or live performance - practice rooms are made to sound terrible anyway. I also agree that it depends on what you mean by "bad or disgusting". To me, a bad sounding cymbal is one with few resonant overtones...solution = buy a better cymbal. Without rebuilding the entire room, all you can do is make it more / less echo-y. If you're really after an amazing sound, you'll have to change your instruments themselves. Moral: sound changes from space to space.
Feb
21
comment Why do quartal progressions typically not utilize common tones?
Great thoughts here. I think it's also important not to equate Parallelism with Quartal vocabulary. Pat's third paragraph addresses the ideas of shifts in harmonic language where instead of linear function, we travel amidst pitch-regions. Debussy was a fan of obscuring - both harmonic function and form. As Pat points out, extensive upper-tertian use saturates the harmonic aural pallet and renders "functional" harmonies as inert. The result is a more smooshy, cloud-like mass that temporally rolls along.
Feb
20
comment Is there a term for a chord progression that chromatically ascends or descends an octave?
@Kevin, reread the last full sentence of my answer. :)
Feb
20
comment What is the Hanson system used for?
@DarrenRinger I think people may be interpreting my comments a little too extremely. My point is simply: functional analysis isn't helpful if the music isn't harmonically functional; it doesn't tell you anything about the piece. This is similar to Einstein's paraphrased thought about a fish being judged by its ability to climb a tree. Darren, I definitely agree with your thoughts, and this is the point of theory - to try and explain how the composer created the music, and more importantly, why it works.
Feb
19
answered Is there a term for a chord progression that chromatically ascends or descends an octave?
Feb
19
comment What is the Hanson system used for?
My larger point is that an analysis of a piece is only as helpful as its accuracy in reflecting the composer's language. Part of a theorist's job then, is to determine which system (or combination thereof) that most closely approximates how the composer created the piece. Interval-vectors would be useful for finding say, all-interval rows, but that's just it - 12-tone music is composed with rows, not vectors.
Feb
19
comment What is the Hanson system used for?
The whole point of music theory is to explain how a piece of music works. If you don't use the same language as the composer, your analysis won't make any sense. If you use roman-numeral analysis on set-theory music, you'll be very confused because your analysis won't make any sense.
Feb
19
answered What is the Hanson system used for?
Feb
12
comment Why is the lowest note on the piano an A?
@BobRodes No worries; as a tuba player, I'm uniquely sensitive to the contra and sub-contra octaves :P
Feb
11
comment Why is the lowest note on the piano an A?
@BobRodes I think you mean "F1", "F0" would be below A0.
Feb
11
comment Octaves in counterpoint
To be clear, the actual motion happening here is called "oblique motion".
Feb
9
comment When practicing on my instrument - which is more important - quantity or quality?
As I have always said - if you want to play fast, you must play slow. If you learn something slowly and correctly, you do not need to repeat it as many times. Be the process. Music is about process. It is about journey.
Feb
8
comment How to differentiate between 12/8 vs 6/8 timing (or hemiola)
@Tim Yes, it is currently in 12/8; I proposed a metrical restructuring more inline with the rhythmic tendencies that would effectively double the number of measures. Therefore, instead of 2 measures of 12/8, you'd have 4 measures of 6/8.
Feb
8
comment How to differentiate between 12/8 vs 6/8 timing (or hemiola)
@Codeswitcher The OP labeled the lower rhythmic count as "melody" and referred to the "melody" as being a half-note and a quarter not. I wasn't suggesting that his phrase(s) were only four notes - only that if he had short phrases, he should restructure metrically. If he has longer phrases, then 12/8 is acceptable. I disagree with your thoughts about "super-short phrases". The OP should use 12/8 if the phrases "feel" in four and 6/8 if the phrases "feel" in two.