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2d
comment What is this called in Taylor Swift's song “Style”?
The wikipedia article is incorrect - it even contradicts its own definition of additive rhythm. Additive rhythms are found most famously in Messiaen's talas - notably in his Quartet for the End of Time.
Apr
17
comment Why are time signatures needed?
@aeismail First, your notation is horrifying. Second, your ideas of "accented" beats are entirely contextual. You should only accent certain beats if it is historically or stylistically necessary. Otherwise, you should play the music as written.
Apr
17
comment Why are time signatures needed?
I heartily disagree with your ideas. Time signatures are dependent on the music. Next time you play Stravinky's Firebird with an orchestra, let me know how it goes without measure numbers. Some forms of music don't need time signatures, like the ones you mentioned, however, it is important to know how best to organize your music. Your comments on key signatures are equally silly and misguided.
Apr
11
comment Do song lyrics need to be complicated and have hidden meaning?
Absolutely not - if you want to be a millionaire, write trashy music with lyrics about sex and you'll be fine.
Apr
2
comment Do triads sound strongest in second inversion?
Also agreed with Tim here - The aural perception of 2nd inversion chords being "strongest" is purely subjective. In actual tradition, they are considered the weakest form of triad because of the 4th in the bass, which has been considered since the Baroque to be a dissonant interval.
Apr
2
comment Do triads sound strongest in second inversion?
Agreed with Pat Muchmore here - it is important to remember the distinctions between open and closed voicings. Matthew's example definition could be considered closed voicing, while Pat's include both closed and open voicings. @Matthew - if a triad was E, C, G, would it not still be in first inversion?
Apr
1
comment How can I learn to read bass clef score more naturally?
I disagree completely here; learning to read music is easy; see my comment to the question above.
Apr
1
comment How can I learn to read bass clef score more naturally?
The answer here is simple: learn the same way you learned treble clef. LINES: GBDFA (Good Boys Do Fine Always) SPACES: ACEG (All Cows Eat Grass). Draw a staff w/ blank paper; draw circles; label them. Read the clef on your guitar / piano. You won't learn it unless you use it / drill yourself. It doesn't have to be complicated.
Apr
1
comment Arranging a piece for full Orchestra
That text was okay in 1880s but, as you mentioned, pretty out of date now. Instruments / aesthetic are different now and information is better / relevant / more practical.
Apr
1
comment Arranging a piece for full Orchestra
What do you mean "possibly Samuel Adler"? - his orchestration book is required reading for practically everyone.
Mar
29
comment How should tuba valve springs of different size be reassembled?
You probably should have paid attention to that before you took the tuba apart.
Mar
22
comment Classical examples of a 'fifth voice' or 'ghost soprano'
@ Dave Thank you for the source - it was an interesting read. Apparently, we are both mistaken, according to the article combination (or "resultant") tones do not exist.
Mar
20
comment Is there more than one use for Roman Numerals in music notation?
Roman numerals are also used in Schenkerian Analysis to direct the listener to specific harmonic moments or shifts.
Mar
20
comment Classical examples of a 'fifth voice' or 'ghost soprano'
@Dave Would you care to cite your sources for this information? I'm really interested to learn more about your perception of the overtone series. If you were a classically trained organist, I might take your conjecture at presented value, but I see that you are not a musician by profession.
Mar
18
comment How can I get the vocals to stand out better in the mix when recording?
Also, I wouldn't recommend cutting the high frequencies from the violins, they're pretty high instruments to begin with, so you'd be robbing their sound. All you really need to do is just emphasize certain frequencies to give the violins and the voice each their own shape. For example, emphasize the frequency of the tonic key for the voice and emphasize the frequency for the dominant for the violin. This is of course very rudimentary, but you get the idea.
Mar
18
comment How can I get the vocals to stand out better in the mix when recording?
I don't think you would have to worry about violins being "too loud"; I don't recall a situation ever where the violins needed to be softer. Real instruments are very different than synthetic ones. Now Brass I could see being a problem.
Mar
16
comment Older Hexachordal Systems referred to in The Study of Counterpoint
@Limited Atonement - The Locrian mode was also missing long before composers started thinking about writing with specific harmonic progressions.
Mar
13
comment What are the characteristic intervals or scales of 13-limit harmony and beyond?
@PatMuchmore Glad to help, and no worries; I mostly just wanted to help you (and others) get un-stuck and moving again. :)
Mar
11
comment What are the characteristic intervals or scales of 13-limit harmony and beyond?
Just wanted to clarify that the assertions about hearing are not my own - just reporting the information that I read to help the OP move along in their research.
Mar
11
comment The teaching of scales, chords and keys
I think the answer to that is subjective - for some people it's never an issue, for others, they just need "permission". Still others might just need a change of attitude while some need to be re-taught. As I said before, you have to know a theory before you can see whether or not it applies to music. I think the real travesty in education would be not making students aware of the difference, so they know the examples in the book aren't true for everything.