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I am a composer!


15h
comment Resources for “popular” counterpoint?
@Clarinetist - you assume through commentary that much counterpoint (and through implication, polyphony) is evident in 21st century films. Most contemporary film music is energy-derived, not motivic; which forms the basis of long-form counterpoint.
Nov
18
comment 4 Voice Part 5 to 1, 4 to 5, 4 to 1, complete 7 to 1, incomplete 7 to 1?
@Dom - yes the OP is asking about 4-part voice leading. The question is vague as they have not specified a medium - pencil and paper? Computer? Chalkboard? Octopus?
Nov
18
comment What are the parts of a classical composition?
Agreed with Caleb here - there are many more questions the OP would need to answer before we could give a thoughtful response, and even then, the answer would be very long. In this instance, it is likely to be more helpful to suggest a book or two.
Nov
17
comment Practice advice: Struggling with alternative left hand and off beat right hand melody
I would practice each entrance only - isolate them and teach your hands when to come in together / separate. Once each isolated entrance is learned, add in one beat on either side of the entrance. Move outward from there.
Nov
3
comment What is the percentage breakdown of different time signatures and their rate of occurrence in popular music?
@mindTree - I'm quite well aware of procedural composition. My comment was hyperbolic, extended through my analogy. Note that I didn't express that your question wasn't appropriate for the site. I merely implied that this may not be the most efficient resource for your question. One would think that contacting the Library of Congress, or ASCAP would be a better use of your time. Additionally, you would need to have a clear definition of what defines "popular" as 100 years ago, the waltz was king, 70 years ago, it was swing.
Nov
2
comment What is the percentage breakdown of different time signatures and their rate of occurrence in popular music?
Musicians are altogether not interested is accumulating statistics of how many times things happen. We are interested in sounds, why they happen, and how they make us feel. This question is impossible to answer as it is impossible to certifiably quantify every piece of music written. It is akin to asking "what is the most popular number of tree rings" and asking for evidence from every tree in the Americas.
Oct
29
comment Debussy: Reflets dans l'eau: Rhythm Ambiguity
The edition you point out does not notate tuplets, which is kind of a no-no and indicates that it is pretty old / out of date (1905 as it is...) with standard notation practice. Metrically, each of the six groupings corresponds to a single triplet-eighth in 4/8 time. Metrically, since there are 6 notes in the last grouping instead of 8, it will of course be slower. The beaming also further supports the notion of 6 groups. #2 doesn't make sense as it would be beamed differently. #3 doesn't work because there would need to be a time signature change to indicate the tuplet - effectively 1/8.
Oct
27
comment Composing/Arranging for a String Quartet
Agreed with Matt here, you just need to watch your intervals / double stops. Remember that your string players need to be able to hear your intervals, so if you write dissonances, plan them intelligently. Also, plan gestures in relation to open strings - use them as much as possible.
Oct
26
comment How to make people interested in what we're teaching?
I voted for this as the answer is primarily opinion-based. This type of question is not new and if the answer to it were simple, the education system would be vastly different than what it is today. In part, students and culture change with time, so the answers we create and our roles as teachers must also change through necessity of preservation.
Oct
15
comment What pitches for singing “Movable Do”?
Technically, I did answer your question as you asked about pitch. However, you meant to ask about frequency. In all tuning systems, pitch classes are always consistent within themselves (due to how the overtone series functions). The actual frequency of F differs depending on the tuning system, but whatever system you're singing in will determine the frequencies of the notes you sing. FYI we use the Equal Temperament system in the Western European tradition. Voice ranges and groups only effect what key you choose, not the frequencies of those keys. Find a key that works for everyone.
Sep
29
comment Why do notes have multiple names?
@Dom - It's also true of other musicians as well; people don't like reading double flats. :) Also, small nitpick - chords can have two notes, they're called diads.
Sep
29
comment Why do notes have multiple names?
I agree with Matthew here: I think the thought and intention is good, however I think the reasoning could be a bit more developed. For example, you didn't mention anything about Tetrachords, use of enharmonics to suggest harmonic function, contextual enharmonic use, or the alphabet rule, to name a few.
Sep
29
comment Why do notes have multiple names?
It's also true for Just Intonation, Meantone Intonation, and microtones as well...
Sep
28
comment Chord notation for stacked and inverted chords or intervals?
Can you be more specific when you say "normal" chord notation? It's unclear if you're talking about macroanalytical notation, figured bass, set theory, 12-tone theory, quintal/quartal/diadic harmony, or others.
Sep
26
comment Terminology for tension idioms in composition
@MartinDrautzburg - you are incorrect here - musical structures can be applied to pieces of any length. There is a Webern piece written in sonata form that is seven measures long. Different types of musical form do not accurately describe music. A four-bar phrase might be the "A" material of a binary, ternary, or rondo form. Regarding contrast, it is precisely your thinking that is limiting you. If you prefer your opinion over others, then do not ask questions if you are not prepared for the answers.
Sep
24
comment short segment of different time signature
yes, you are quite right. My comments / thoughts are usually made with respect to "classical" music only; including other genres by name as necessary.
Sep
23
comment short segment of different time signature
agreed; my only stipulation is that I think you should say "...though it's not terribly common in certain time periods...". Certainly most music written within the last 110 years or so contains many, many time signature changes.
Sep
23
comment short segment of different time signature
Would the 6/4 would better as two 3/4 measures? Also, see my comment to the answer below.
Sep
23
comment short segment of different time signature
I do see your points, but I'm definitely of the mindset: "suck it up and learn to read".
Sep
22
comment leaps: small vs. large (learning counterpoint)
@Dom, regardless of how a 4th is classified (you'll find different answers depending on where you look), the important thing is to understand how to treat it. My teachers always classified it as a leap because (in addition to the rules I mentioned earlier) it made you think twice about using 4ths (a good habit to get into). Mark, to answer your question directly, a large leap would be anything larger than a P5th.