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Feb
6
comment How to give classes on improvisation
@luserdroog Wow, I can't believe you found this...yeah, I had an issue with email at the time and lost the account. I will have them merge the accounts; thank you for finding this.
Jan
22
comment 7th chord notation confusion
Not a problem; I always appreciate it when people point things out to me.
Jan
21
comment 7th chord notation confusion
Just to clarify for the OP, the 4/3 and 4/2 inversions have implied "6" in them: "6/4/3" and "6/4/2"
Jan
20
comment Is F Lydian mode in the “key” of C Major?
@ToddWilcox Absolutely not; my point was that just because you analyze a piece a certain way on paper using your eyes, doesn't mean that it actually sounds the way you've analyzed it. The whole point of analysis is to explain why music sounds the way it does, but too many people get caught up in what it looks like. This is dangerous because you're operating in a vacuum then, and you'll twist the music to justify your analysis. Much music has been written with no existing key or even pitch centers. We need to make sure the notation matches the music, not our personal goals.
Jan
20
comment Is F Lydian mode in the “key” of C Major?
@RockinCowboy In Western Equal Temperament, there are 12 pitch classes. In strictly mono-tonal music, yes, there are 12 possible pitch-class-centers.
Jan
20
comment Calculating the 'Tonal Center of a Musical Key
@DonnGoodside Welcome to the site! It would appear that you've been given some incorrect / misleading information. I've voted to close this particular question because it's a bit unclear exactly what you're asking. If you post a link / clarify your question, many people here would be happy to help.
Jan
20
comment Is F Lydian mode in the “key” of C Major?
@Dom TBH, I think it obscurs your original point rather than validating / supporting. Just because something looks a certain way doesn't mean it necessarily works that way. On paper, I could let your progression slide by in F major, but if I listened to it, I wouldn't feel right leaving it that way. Since music is ultimately a "heard", we must defer to our ears for guidance. Following paper-vacuum logic, you could argue that there aren't in fact any modes and none of it matters anyway; what's to stop you from analyzing it in G mixolydian or something else to justify your reasoning?
Jan
20
comment Is F Lydian mode in the “key” of C Major?
check out my comment to Dom's answer.
Jan
20
comment Is F Lydian mode in the “key” of C Major?
@Dom Two points to mention: 1.) I think if you play through your progression, you won't hear it relative to "F" as a tonal center. The raised 4th incidentally turns the "G" chord into a secondary dominant, which naturally leads to C. So, I don't buy that your progression is "more at home in F Lydian". 2.) I think you should make the distinction between "keys" and "pitch collections". While you're correct that the two are not the same key, the OP's basic premise is actually correct; despite different tonal centers, they share the same pitch collection (F Lydian is after all a mode of C.)
Jan
19
comment A seriously difficult question about mistakes and intepretation of music
I think you as the writer would need to determine what it syncopation versus what is "out of time". Generally, the idea is that if you can't express the idea with your current language of notation, then your idea needs another language of notation, thus, being "out of time". Alternatively, a melody may be sung arhythmically which means "no discernable rhythmic unit or cohesion" is present. If that's the case, then notation wouldn't really matter to begin with. As myself and others have said, you can't justify music with math. Serialism and combinatoriality was popular for a while, but no more
Jan
15
comment How to test mouthpieces?
Agreed with Josiah in that a lot goes into the preference of the player. Musicians like different mouthpieces for different types of music that they play for various reasons. For example, some brass players prefer sharper edges for crisper articulation, while others prefer rounder edges for comfort (especially if playing a long gig). Still others prefer a deep cup while other prefer a shallower cup. Musicians find mouthpieces that suit their personal preferences. Tangentially, you need to be explicit about what you mean when you say "efficient" as it could mean several different things.
Jan
9
comment Is it common for an orchestra to have 5 string double basses?
Agreed here. Very common now to either see the C-extension or the 5 string bass. Tangentially, a bassist friend of mine told me about a quiet sub-culture of bassists who prefer to tune in perfect fifths instead of the standard tuning.
Jan
8
comment How to improve this verse written in an uncommon 7/8 metre?
I'm voting to close as this question is opinion-based. I will say that whatever time signature you use, you need to be consistent with your metric subdivision. You need to show the beat subdivision of the measure - especially important in asymmetric meters. The examples you've provided are quite sloppy.
Jan
7
comment Why do guitar teachers and lesson books teach playing a G Major chord without using your pinky?
@ToddWilcox Certainly. Depending on the age of the student, I'll sometimes start with just one or two finger voicings for chords. Personally, I like open-string chords to start because it gives them a feeling of success to balance out the finger dexterity exercises I have them do.
Dec
29
comment B - F - A chord in the key of C major
@Patrx2 I can see that as well; I just thought I'd offer a different viewpoint for the sake of variety. It would be interesting to see where this music comes from.
Dec
28
comment How to give classes on improvisation
@Turion Hope you find them helpful; I use these ideas when I myself teach improvisation. Do let us know how it goes!
Dec
28
comment How to give classes on improvisation
@NeilMeyer I also sincerely disagree with your assertions about improvisation, melodies, and jazz. Improvising has been around for milennia, jazz has only been around for about 130 years.
Dec
28
comment B - F - A chord in the key of C major
I actually think it's a typo. If the "A" were replaced with a "G" would make the chord a V6/5 with an omitted fifth, a very common move. We know from the first two chords that smooth voice-leading is acceptable in this piece of music, so it's possible. Half-diminished chords were mostly used as pre-dominants, not as agents of cadences themselves, like the leading-tone chord. Because of this fact, I think it's unlikely that the composer would have used a half-diminished chord to resolve to tonic; unless the function is to prolong a plagal cadence as Patrx22 describes.
Dec
23
comment How to give classes on improvisation
@Turion I'll try to elaborate tomorrow if I get some time. Something a little bit more simple for soloing would be So What? - people just move over two different minor-7 chords; it's pretty straightforward. The big thing to remember about all this is that you're teaching people to think creativelyas opposed to specific jazz techniques. Anything I write out would be through that vein - focusing on improvising in a general sense.
Dec
23
comment How to give classes on improvisation
I would add that they should learn C-Jam Blues and progression in all 12 keys, being able to arpeggiate the chord changes. A good introductory class might be having them focus on listening by having musical "conversations" either in groups or as a full group. You can make up rules like "only 4 people improvising at a maximum time" using only body percussion. Imposing limits / frameworks forces people to be creative. Arbitrary or ridiculous rules ("must use an animal sound") can get people to think differently, thus, more creatively, thus improvising will be more fun.