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location Illinois
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comment When to use a dot or a tie in music notation?
In 4/4 time, I'd say it's fine for a dotted quarter note to start on the "and" of beat one or three, since a dotted quarter note is expected to carry on through the next beat; no form of quarter note should generally cross from beat 2 to 3, however. Any quarter note which starts in the first half of a measure should fit entirely within it; likewise any quarter note that starts in the second half. As for having four beamed dotted notes, that would seem a little odd except in something like 6/8 or 12/8 time, and even there a duple bracket might be better.
Aug
13
comment How to play chords like G/B
That's B-x-G-D-G-X; I could see advantages to using a higher hand position if one were putting a B on top (e.g. 7-x-9-7-8-7 or 7-10-9-7-8-7 (bar 7th fret), but I'm curious why you would suggest using a higher hand position but then not use the upper E string?
Aug
12
comment How to play chords like G/B
How about an open "G" chord but simply omit the sixth string? That would voice it as B-D-G-B-G, which I would think should be good.
Aug
3
comment Are doubly augmented and doubly diminished intervals practical?
...reduced twice (and thus became only singly-diminished) or minor intervals that got expanded twice (and thus only singly-augmented). I have actually encountered a doubly-diminished second (pitch moving the opposite direction of the staff note) in print (choral sheet music); there was a section of about eight bars that was in Cb, but two non-consecutive bars within that section notated pitches enharmonically as though it was in a "sharps" key. I'm sure it was "accidental", but it was definitely weird having the staff notes go one way and the pitches go the other.
Aug
3
comment Are doubly augmented and doubly diminished intervals practical?
@PatMuchmore: You're quite right of course (corrected I think). A transition from D# to Db could be a doubly-diminished or doubly-augmented octave, depending upon direction. I know I've heard music which modulated with an old-key V7 going to the tonic of the key a major second higher, so although the choice of starting key was contrived to cause "trouble", the chord sequence was "real". I found it surprisingly difficult to create any sort of doubly-augmented or diminished interval, since just about all the intervals which could get "double-whammied" were either major intervals which got...
Aug
3
revised Are doubly augmented and doubly diminished intervals practical?
Corrected diminished->augmented
Aug
2
answered Are doubly augmented and doubly diminished intervals practical?
Aug
1
comment What makes an interval “Perfect”?
@syntonicC: I would suggest that a 4:5:6 major chord is to a 4:5.06:6 chord what a photograph of scenery is to a tracking-camera shot of that same scenery. Adding a little motion to the scene makes it much easier for the brain to separate out the items within it. I don't think people's preference for slightly-sharp thirds is just cultural--I think that the brain needs the changing phase relationships between notes of a chord in order to hear them cleanly as distinct notes.
Jul
29
comment Barre chord F and barre chords in general
It may be worth noting that while playing a 6-string G-bar chord may be difficult or impossible for many people, playing the top four strings of a G-bar chord is very easy.
Jul
17
comment Will Playing a Guitar Through a Bass Set-Up Damage the Amplifier and/or Speaker?
@LeeWhite: It should certainly be possible to design an amplified speaker in such fashion that the electronics would never drive the voice coil beyond its safe mechanical limits, and I would expect that many are in fact designed in that fashion. An amp driven hard enough that the electronics had to restrain the output would probably sound lousy until the volume was reduced, but not as bad as one with a blown voice coil. I don't know if manufacturers clearly indicating whether amps will be robust in the face of any remotely-reasonable input signal, but it should be possible.
Jul
16
comment Is there a minimum of notes and chords i need to determine the key of a song?
A song's key signature doesn't always relate to its tonality. If Arthur's Theme ("Best that you can do") and "El Shaddai" are transposed so that the first chord is Dm, both would start with the chord sequence "Dm G7 C F Bb E7..."; and both melodies have the same tonality (one could sing them simultaneously and they'd fit) but the key signature of the former would be A major (I think) and the latter, C major.
Jul
12
comment Song Structure: What's up with Verse/Chorus/Verse 2/Chorus/Verse 3/Bridge/Chorus?
I would consider the "AABA" form to be a variation of the "verse/chorus" form which omits the chorus after the first and last verses (the form sound good when extended as AABABA, but sounds odd if any even-numbered piece isn't an A).
Jul
11
answered A Major Key Song for a Sad Lyrics - a Mismatch?
Jul
10
comment Is i-V a stronger progression than I-V?
Chord progressions are to a large extent compelling (or not) because of the movement of the notes within the chord. A major seventh will only be perceived as a movement if no other notes are nearby. While your question may have been for tonic-dominant, I think looking at what makes V7-I is compelling (and trying it with different voicings) will help you understand other chord changes. Try doing chord progressions with three notes in different octaves (for G7 use G-B-F) and you'll notice that arrangements where all three pitches in one chord are near those in the other are more compelling.
Jul
10
comment Is i-V a stronger progression than I-V?
It may be worth noting that in a V7-I progression (e.g. G7-C), the third and seventh of the V chord (B and F) form a diminished fifth that produces tension; moving to the I chord changes the B to a C and the F to an E--both minor-second moves. In a G7-Cm resolution, because the F in a G7 creates much more tension than the D, the F-Eb movement will be more noticeable than the D-Eb, even though the latter interval is smaller. Because F-Eb is a major second, it's not as compelling a move as the F-E in a V-I.
Jul
10
comment Is i-V a stronger progression than I-V?
I would suggest that the interval between the third of the V and the root of the I is a minor second, rather than a major seventh. Also, if you use a V7 chord, its seventh will generally move to the third of the I via another minor second. V7 to I is a very strong resolution because the diminished fifth between the V chord's third and seventh can resolve to a major third.
Jul
3
comment “slash” chords, e.g. B/F♯ - are these only for inversions, or can any note be the bass note?
A C/F, Cadd4, and a Cadd11 all contain at least one F, but in the former it should be below the lowest root; for the second, it should be somewhere above the root, and for the third it should be more than an octave above the root. One would generally only write Cadd11/F if there should be (at least) two F's, two octaves apart.
Jun
9
comment Building an electric guitar from scratch
...as they decay. I wonder if anyone's endeavored to design a guitar so the string could move over the saddles, and fastened the ends of the strings to springs which would hold a more uniform tension?
Jun
9
comment Building an electric guitar from scratch
Given that the strings on an electric generally have steel as the "tension" element (do any wound strings use something else?), having the guitar expand about the same amount as the strings would probably be a good thing. I don't know how the COE of stainless compares with the alloy used in strings, but unless it's vastly greater I would think uniform expansion in the structure would be a good thing for tuning stability. BTW, I have both a 3/4 and full-scale guitars, and the 3/4 is more comfortable to play, but the change in tension when a string is plucked means notes change pitch...
Jun
8
comment Building an electric guitar from scratch
...I would think a stainless steel frame would be dimensionally more stable than wood under conditions of varying humidity. No way I could cast such a thing myself, but I'm curious how the cost and performance would compare with more "conventional" approaches. Having the "guitar guts" of a guitar be a solid assembly that could be placed into any desired body (which would not have to endure mechanical stress) would have a certain appeal, and could also help make the instrument more portable.