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location Illinois
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visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen 12 hours ago

12h
comment Is there any name for two melodies that are being played at the same time?
Normally the term "counterpoint" would imply that at least one of the melodies was deliberately designed to fit with the other. Would be the term to describe cases where the two melodies were composed entirely independently and combined by someone unaffiliated with the composer of either melody?
13h
comment Does each note have a more specific name depending on its pitch?
Related to MIDI numbers, one may specify pitches by combining a note name with an octave number. Within each octave, C is the lowest note, and C5=60=middle C (so Cn is 12 times n).
13h
comment What is this electrical thing in my piano?
There may be places where humidity never gets very low, but that doesn't mean its "constant". Small changes in temperature can cause a certain level of absolute humidity to go from being slightly under 100% relative humidity to slightly over. Keeping the piano slightly warmer than its environment would ensure that its relative humidity would always be slightly lower than the surrounding air (and thus below 100%). It may not be possible to protect a grand piano while it's in use, but it could still be protected when it's not in use.
2d
comment What is this electrical thing in my piano?
As a slight clarification, its purpose is to protect a piano is stored in conditions where temperature and humidity can cycle (e.g. a building which is used a few hours a week, and is unheated when not in use). If the air were warm and humid when the heat was switched off, and then very slowly cooled, then when the temperature reached the new point, moisture could condense on everything. Condensation on strings could induce rust. Adding the heater will ensure that whenever the air is at the dew point, the piano will always be a tiny bit above that, so condense will happen elsewhere.
Nov
24
comment How much does an electric guitar's body physics affect the tone, playability, etc?
When vibrational energy reaches a joint between two materials with different mechanical impedance, some energy will be reflected in phase, some will be reflected out of phase, some will be converted to heat, and some will be transferred; the extent to which the different behaviors occur will depend upon the materials in question. The mechanical characteristics of parts of the guitar which receive significant vibrational energy will affect the sound; mechanical characteristics of parts which don't receive significant energy, won't.
Nov
22
comment Are counterpoint and harmony mutually exclusive?
I think one could have counterpoint if one had two instruments which never played simultaneously, but I'm not sure that could be called harmony. If that could be called harmony, then the same could be said even if the two separate instruments were replaced with one instrument that played all the notes.
Nov
22
comment What does the distance between a pickup and strings do for the sound?
...and thus wiring such a coil in series with the primary coil would yield the noise cancellation advantages of a humbucker without the distortion. I wonder why I've not seen guitars do that? Also, I would think that if a guitar used magnetized pole pieces, having "C"-shaped pieces of metal which touch the magnet in the middle (forming an "E") and wrap around the sides would improve gain; do you know if that's what some of the more exotic pickups are doing?
Nov
22
comment What does the distance between a pickup and strings do for the sound?
I saw a YouTube video of someone removing one set of pole pieces from a humbucker and getting a sound much closer to that of a single-coil pickup while retaining the noise-cancellation advantages. I would expect that what makes humbuckers sound different is the fact that the field lines from one set of pole pieces are bent toward the other, thus creating a stronger magnetic-field gradient and increasing the non-linearity of the response; I would further expect that an empty coil placed next to a single-coil pickup would naturally receive an anti-phase magnetic signal...
Nov
21
comment Electric guitar vs classical guitar
@VarLogRant: I like my Squier Bullet. There's no way I'd mistake it for a $500 guitar, but I have the action dialed in nicely so I enjoy playing it.
Nov
21
answered Electric guitar vs classical guitar
Nov
19
comment Do different synthesizers produce the exact same sawtooth (and square, etc) waveform?
...from software synthesizers. In my own experience with software synthesis around 1990, I found that perfect sawtooth and square waves tend to have objectionable aliasing effects at frequencies anywhere near Nyquist, but even simple linear smoothing helps reduce that considerably.
Nov
19
comment Do different synthesizers produce the exact same sawtooth (and square, etc) waveform?
@JCPedroza: Any device which tries to output a "perfectly" sharp edge is going to end up introducing distortion which will likely be affected by things like operating temperature, the impedance of the load, etc. I'm not sure to what extent analog synthesizers intended for musical use endeavor to make edges have the same slope for all frequencies, or to what extent they try to make the slope be proportional to frequency, since both approaches pose design challenges. BTW, I misread the earlier post as indicating that those traces came from analog synths; they seem curious as waves...
Nov
18
answered Do different synthesizers produce the exact same sawtooth (and square, etc) waveform?
Nov
14
comment Is “You shouldn't play all 6 strings together on an electric guitar” good teaching?
@quickthyme: Everything depends upon the style of music. There are some styles where strumming 5-6 notes is entirely the right thing to do, and others where it's the wrong thing to do. If the styles one wants to play are those where 5-6 chords are appropriate, and one is capable of playing such the chords cleanly, the fact that they would be inappropriate for other styles shouldn't be an issue.
Nov
14
comment Is “You shouldn't play all 6 strings together on an electric guitar” good teaching?
Saying "patently false" is a bit harsh, but I think it is fair to say that distortion generally requires using fewer strings, while cleaner sounds work better with more. I use chords of 5-6 strings almost exclusively (sometimes strummed as a group, or 1+4, or five individual notes, or three individual notes followed by the last two together, etc.) My reason for using an electric rather than an acoustic isn't that I want the "electric guitar sound", so much as that cheap electrics have better actions than cheap acoustics.
Nov
14
comment Octave clef: common usage?
@dumbledad: I've encountered SATB music written with rhythmically-homophonic SAT on a G-clef staff (all at pitch) and a rhythmically-different bass part on a F-clef staff. It's also common for publishers to simply omit any sort of octave marking when writing G-clef tenor parts. In most cases it will be obvious which octave the tenors should sing.
Nov
14
comment Is there any real-world difference between time signatures such as 4/4 and 8/8?
The question of whether a beat comes "early" or "late" is an interesting one. I find it interesting that "America" [Bernstein: West Side Story] is marked as "6/8 3/4", but some other pieces which with similar stress patterns are simply written as 3/4. Something like "Lion Tamer" [Schwartz: The Magic Show] is written as 7/4 (with a notation to subdivide it as 3/4+4/4), but the text would sound very awkward if an accent were placed on the second quarter-note beat, rather than an eighth-note later. Still, it might be reasonable to view the stressed note as being an "early" third beat.
Nov
14
answered Development of electric guitar - why not put a mic in front of a acoustic guitar?
Nov
14
answered Why is greensleeves considered to be in sextuple meter?
Nov
13
comment Is “You shouldn't play all 6 strings together on an electric guitar” good teaching?
@Tim: I don't think so. On my guitars, the clearer sound is on the neck pickup. When I want to emphasize the bass strings, I use little metal bars to bridge the top four pairs of magnets on the humbucker pickups (softening the treble strings). The effect of adding the bars to the neck pickup is noticeable when the switch is set for the position I would describe as giving the "clearer sound". Maybe we differ in how we interpret "clearer" and "fatter"?