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location Illinois
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visits member for 1 year, 9 months
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Jul
29
comment Barre chord F and barre chords in general
It may be worth noting that while playing a 6-string G-bar chord may be difficult or impossible for many people, playing the top four strings of a G-bar chord is very easy.
Jul
17
comment Will Playing a Guitar Through a Bass Set-Up Damage the Amplifier and/or Speaker?
@LeeWhite: It should certainly be possible to design an amplified speaker in such fashion that the electronics would never drive the voice coil beyond its safe mechanical limits, and I would expect that many are in fact designed in that fashion. An amp driven hard enough that the electronics had to restrain the output would probably sound lousy until the volume was reduced, but not as bad as one with a blown voice coil. I don't know if manufacturers clearly indicating whether amps will be robust in the face of any remotely-reasonable input signal, but it should be possible.
Jul
16
comment Is there a minimum of notes and chords i need to determine the key of a song?
A song's key signature doesn't always relate to its tonality. If Arthur's Theme ("Best that you can do") and "El Shaddai" are transposed so that the first chord is Dm, both would start with the chord sequence "Dm G7 C F Bb E7..."; and both melodies have the same tonality (one could sing them simultaneously and they'd fit) but the key signature of the former would be A major (I think) and the latter, C major.
Jul
12
comment Song Structure: What's up with Verse/Chorus/Verse 2/Chorus/Verse 3/Bridge/Chorus?
I would consider the "AABA" form to be a variation of the "verse/chorus" form which omits the chorus after the first and last verses (the form sound good when extended as AABABA, but sounds odd if any even-numbered piece isn't an A).
Jul
11
answered A Major Key Song for a Sad Lyrics - a Mismatch?
Jul
10
comment Is i-V a stronger progression than I-V?
Chord progressions are to a large extent compelling (or not) because of the movement of the notes within the chord. A major seventh will only be perceived as a movement if no other notes are nearby. While your question may have been for tonic-dominant, I think looking at what makes V7-I is compelling (and trying it with different voicings) will help you understand other chord changes. Try doing chord progressions with three notes in different octaves (for G7 use G-B-F) and you'll notice that arrangements where all three pitches in one chord are near those in the other are more compelling.
Jul
10
comment Is i-V a stronger progression than I-V?
It may be worth noting that in a V7-I progression (e.g. G7-C), the third and seventh of the V chord (B and F) form a diminished fifth that produces tension; moving to the I chord changes the B to a C and the F to an E--both minor-second moves. In a G7-Cm resolution, because the F in a G7 creates much more tension than the D, the F-Eb movement will be more noticeable than the D-Eb, even though the latter interval is smaller. Because F-Eb is a major second, it's not as compelling a move as the F-E in a V-I.
Jul
10
comment Is i-V a stronger progression than I-V?
I would suggest that the interval between the third of the V and the root of the I is a minor second, rather than a major seventh. Also, if you use a V7 chord, its seventh will generally move to the third of the I via another minor second. V7 to I is a very strong resolution because the diminished fifth between the V chord's third and seventh can resolve to a major third.
Jul
3
comment “slash” chords, e.g. B/F♯ - are these only for inversions, or can any note be the bass note?
A C/F, Cadd4, and a Cadd11 all contain at least one F, but in the former it should be below the lowest root; for the second, it should be somewhere above the root, and for the third it should be more than an octave above the root. One would generally only write Cadd11/F if there should be (at least) two F's, two octaves apart.
Jun
9
comment Building an electric guitar from scratch
...as they decay. I wonder if anyone's endeavored to design a guitar so the string could move over the saddles, and fastened the ends of the strings to springs which would hold a more uniform tension?
Jun
9
comment Building an electric guitar from scratch
Given that the strings on an electric generally have steel as the "tension" element (do any wound strings use something else?), having the guitar expand about the same amount as the strings would probably be a good thing. I don't know how the COE of stainless compares with the alloy used in strings, but unless it's vastly greater I would think uniform expansion in the structure would be a good thing for tuning stability. BTW, I have both a 3/4 and full-scale guitars, and the 3/4 is more comfortable to play, but the change in tension when a string is plucked means notes change pitch...
Jun
8
comment Building an electric guitar from scratch
...I would think a stainless steel frame would be dimensionally more stable than wood under conditions of varying humidity. No way I could cast such a thing myself, but I'm curious how the cost and performance would compare with more "conventional" approaches. Having the "guitar guts" of a guitar be a solid assembly that could be placed into any desired body (which would not have to endure mechanical stress) would have a certain appeal, and could also help make the instrument more portable.
Jun
8
comment Building an electric guitar from scratch
To what extent should an electric guitar's structure be expected to affect the sound, and to what extent should the contact points with the strings attempt to minimize energy transfer (so the body would receive very little sound energy to "do anything with")? I've wondered sometimes about whether it would make sense to construct an electric guitar with a cast stainless steel frame, rather than using wood with a truss rod. Weight along the fretboard and near the bridge would seem more helpful at minimizing energy transfer than weight elsewhere, and...
May
28
comment Do SIT (stay-in-tune) brand strings really stay-in-tune better than any others?
If the two ends of the guitar are moved apart by e.g. 0.1", I believe (correct me if I'm wrong) that with typical strings at typical tension levels, the increase in tension [which is a function of Young's modulus] will raise the pitch significantly more than the change in length will reduce it. If Young's modulus were lower, then the change in tension resulting from the change in length would be reduced.
May
27
comment Do SIT (stay-in-tune) brand strings really stay-in-tune better than any others?
Excessive friction at the nut will certainly cause problems, and I'm not sure that a lower E would help with those, but many instruments also have problems with things like dimensional stability under changing temperature and humidity conditions. I would expect that cutting E in half would reduce by half the amount by which an instrument is put out of tune by a 0.01" change in length.
May
27
comment Do SIT (stay-in-tune) brand strings really stay-in-tune better than any others?
I would expect that some string materials could have different coefficients of elasticity than others, and that a string with a lower coefficient of elasticity would stay in tune better than one with a higher coefficient.
May
16
comment Can I use semi-acoustic guitar with overdrive (or compressor) without getting feedback?
It may be worth mentioning that when using an amp "clean", having the volume low enough not to totally blast the guitarist will usually mean the gain is low enough not to cause feedback but using a compressor or distortion will cause the gain at low volumes to be much higher than it otherwise would. If with loud sounds the gain is set at 5% of the point that would cause feedback noises, but quieter sounds are boosted 100-fold, then the amplifiers will generate annoying feedback noises at whatever level would cause gain to fall back to a factor of 20.
May
6
comment Why are pianos traditionally tuned “out of tune” at the extremes?
I think that technically the issue isn't so much that partials are sharp, but rather that all frequencies including the fundamental and the partials are flat of what theory would predict, but the effect on the fundamental is, in relative terms, greater than on the partials, so they end up being "less flat".
May
6
comment How does a piano go out of tune?
How many pianos have wood as part of the structure maintaining string tension? I know that at least historically some did, but I thought that nearly all pianos had a cast iron frame which would hold the strings in tension even if all the wooden portions of the structure were removed.
May
5
comment What are the true frequencies of the piano keys?
@JCPedroza: Each string will vibrate at a multiple frequencies, most of which will be almost--but not quote--equal to integer multiples of its fundamental frequency. These other frequencies will cause the apparent pitch of a string to differ slightly from its fundamental frequency. Because treble strings and bass strings are constructed differently, their frequency mixes differ, as does the amount by which their apparent pitch differs from their fundamental frequency. Octave stretching compensates for this.