612 reputation
28
bio website
location Illinois
age 44
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen 10 hours ago

Jul
9
comment Does a chord need to include its root?
In the key of C major, if a trio of voices were singing BDF and they resolved into CEG, I would think it would be more meaningful to view the progression as a V7->I rather than as a vii°->I, even in the absence of the G on the first chord; YMMV.
Jul
9
comment Is it possible for a left hander to learn guitar right handed?
An Ab chord (the lowest closed-form bar chord) on the bottom four strings would be 4311XX. If one reverses the string order, the pinky plays the first (bass) string, the ring finger plays the second string but may safely touch the first, and the index finger plays third and fourth strings but may safely touch the first and second.
Jul
9
comment Is it possible for a left hander to learn guitar right handed?
Using a right-handed guitar left-handed, it will be possible to use the lower four strings to play major and minor bar chords in any inversion without "crossing fingers". I'm right handed, and I haven't tried playing a left-handed guitar, but when I started trying to play the instrument, I was curious to try a left-handed guitar for that reason (as it is, I tune my upper strings to minor thirds to achieve a similar effect).
Jun
16
comment Why transpose at the octave?
The program "Master Composer" for the Commodore 64 had treble and bass staves marked with the appropriate staffs, and also had a staff marked TR+ above the treble staff (line notes CEGBD reading up IIRC) and one marked BA- below the bass (CAFDB reading down). I've never seen that notation elsewhere. I would think having a staff marked with with two consecutive treble clefs reading an octave above a staff with one could be nice for handbell music, since such a staff could stack above a treble cleff with two ledger lines between.
Jun
15
comment What Does a Compressor Pedal Do?
One thing I've wished for in my multi-effects pedal would be a means of having the compressor normalize the volume of the sound to a certain level before applying distortion, but then undo the effect of that compression after. I don't know that I've seen effects pedals do such a thing, but I would expect that it should add a level of independence between sound character and envelope shaping.
Jun
15
answered Why transpose at the octave?
Jun
15
comment The same note on two staves
@slim: Many vocalists will find it useful to hear a melody played on the piano, even if they prefer to perform without it.
Jun
15
comment Are whole and half note rests supposed to only be written on specific lines?
For cases where a voice drops out for many measures, it may be better to simply have a notation "Altos only" or "Soprano tacet until measure 37", but if voices are entering and leaving frequently, using rests is often clearer.
Jun
15
answered How to recreate a sound on a synth
May
30
comment Same note in two staves
@dumbledad: Another possibility is different durations, but starting at the same time (rather than overlapping). In that situation, the shorter note should often be performed as a rest (i.e. whichever hand has the longer note should be the one to play it), whereas in the linked scenario the hand with the longer note should play it; the later-arriving shorter note might be played with either hand as convenient.
May
23
answered Why is the highest frequency on a piano 4186 Hertz?
May
22
comment Why is a grand piano better than an upright piano?
@Tim: I think what he's saying is that when a fast-moving hammer strikes the strings that will produce a note, it doesn't stop and then fall down, but will "bounce" downward off the string. If a key mechanism were to simply push the hammer to within e.g. 1/8" of the string and let it fly the rest of the way, but didn't get out of the way for the rebound, the hammer could bounce off the string, then off the key mechanism, then off the string again, then the key mechanism, etc.
May
19
comment Why are there twelve notes in an octave?
I've read discussions of 19-TET (19-tone equal temperament) in which a diatonic scale would have five "large" intervals of 3/19 octave and two "small" intervals of 2/19 octave. Such a scale would be amenable to normal music notation if one regards e.g. C# and Db as being 1/3 step apart. The biggest oddity would be that key signatures with up to nine sharps or flats would be distinct (rather than having C#/Db, F#/Gb, and B/Cb as pairs of sound-alike key signatures).
May
19
comment Why are there twelve notes in an octave?
I think more fundamentally, (3/2)^12 (129.75) is close to a power of two (128). Thus, the fifths on a 12-note equal-tempered scale have a ratio of 1.498:1 (ideal would be 1.5:1), which is closer to perfect than for any other reasonable number of notes.
May
19
comment Why does a piano have only one or two strings per note in the bass register, but three for other registers?
Incidentally, the biggest problem with low string tension is that with most materials the tension increases substantially when the string's length is pulled longer. Some materials like phosphor-bronze have a smaller change in tension for a given change in length. While phosphor-bronze is not very dense, it is useful as a core material for strings because one can pull it considerably without changing tension too much.
May
19
comment Why does a piano have only one or two strings per note in the bass register, but three for other registers?
Constructing the strings from a heavier alloy would be helpful. Unfortunately, for a string to work well it must have certain mechanical properties including flexibility (the calculations above assume the primary impediment to flexing is the tension of the string, rather than its stiffness). Gold alloys might work well, but would be too expensive to be practical. Lead isn't nearly as dense, but would be cheaper. Don't think I've heard of lead-alloy-wound strings, though, for whatever reason.
May
17
answered Why does a piano have only one or two strings per note in the bass register, but three for other registers?
May
6
answered How to play together online?
Apr
30
comment Glossary of Guitar Effects
As it is, it seems most distortion effects have a fairly small "sweet spot" of levels where they work well, and cause dynamics in one's playing to translate primarily into changes in timbre rather than volume.
Apr
30
comment Glossary of Guitar Effects
One type of "effect" I've thought would be useful to have in a multi-pedal, though I've not seen it, would be to have a configurable automatic gain control (level compression) which would be applied before a distortion effect, followed by a gain adjustment after the distortion which would undo some or all of the effect of the previous AGC. For example, things might be set up so that playing at a level of -20dBm would boost the signal by 21dB (clipping slightly) and then reduce volume by 20dB, while playing at -10dBm would boost by 12dB (clipping a bit more) and then reduce by 12dB.