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location Illinois
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visits member for 1 year, 9 months
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Apr
25
comment Why is there a key signature if I never play those notes?
Actually, one could argue in favor of using a separate set of key signatures for harmonic minor (e.g. C minor would have Eb and Ab but not Bb; D minor would have Bb and C#). That's not common practice (the convention is to write major-ish pieces in the key signature for the corresponding Ionian mode, and minor-ish pieces in the key signature for the corresponding Aeolian mode, and put in whatever accidentals are made necessary by such usage.
Apr
25
comment Piano music with two treble clefs, and notes between staves
@Tim: If pianist uses the right thumb and index finger to play the lower A's and C#'s in the treble clef, the distances between the fingers will be reasonable, but adding a "D" to the mix would require that it be played with the middle finger--quite a stretch from the upper "A". That having been said, I'm surprised the fourth beat doesn't omit the C# so as to free up the index finger for the E. Otherwise, playing that beat smoothly would seem to require six fingers.
Apr
22
comment What is a good source for learning playing all shapes of a chord?
If an A7-shape bar will be followed by an E-shape bar in a V-I relationship, the third-string seventh is better; if followed by a C-shape or D-shape bar (in V-I) the first-string seventh is better. Personally, I use a tuning which allows bar chords analogous to the A- and E shapes chords to be played (in major, minor, and seventh forms) more easily than with standard tuning; a G7 would be fretted X-5-5-6-6-8 and voiced as G-g-b-d'-f'; a C7 would be fretted as 5-5-5-5-8-8 and voiced as c-G-g-bb-d'-f'; both seventh-chord forms have the dominant chord's seventh lead into the next chord's third.
Apr
22
comment What is a good source for learning playing all shapes of a chord?
I find the A-shape bar is rather difficult to play. Doing an "inside chord" with just the middle four strings may make it much easier (one can bar the first string on the same fret as the second through fourth, but not play it); one can turn the chord into a seventh chord by using the pinky to finger the first string a fret higher. Another useful moveable form is to bar the top four strings, but put the pinky on the top string up three frets (basically a G-shape bar without the bottom two strings).
Apr
18
comment Two consecutive mdi note-on of the same pitch misbehaving
I would expect any reasonable translation of guitar to MIDI should use one channel per string. If one does that, hammer ons, pull-offs, etc. could be accomplished either with various combinations of portamento and pitch-bend controls, or by designating certain velocity values as having "special" meanings (so that e.g. a "note on" velocity of 2 would represent a fretted finger which was not accompanied by a pluck).
Apr
18
comment Two consecutive mdi note-on of the same pitch misbehaving
I don't think overlapping notes are a particularly gray area. The combination (channel number + note number) is the only means of designating particular notes to be cancelled; thus, if it will be necessary to cancel one note at a given pitch while sustaining another, the two notes must be on separate channels.
Apr
9
comment Correct notation for a minor chord?
You can see a partial preview copy at onlinesheetmusic.com/amazed-p304281.aspx (I'd figured the chords by ear (second thing I ever did on the guitar, interestingly enough); for my second Cb chord the sheet music shows Abm7 (don't think I'd used one of those before; with my tuning, a Cb chord is voiced as Cb Gb Gb Cb Eb Gb on frets 4-4-4-6-7-7; when I get home I'll have to try 4-4-6-6-7-7, 4-6-6-6-7-7, and x-6-6-6-7-7 and see how they sound).
Apr
8
comment Correct notation for a minor chord?
@Tim: The chord sequence is "2x (Ab Eb Fm Db) Cb Gb Cb Fb 2x(Db Ab Bbm Gb) Fb Gb Ab". The "Cb Gb Cb Fb" doesn't feel like it's centered on Ab major; from an analytical perspective there's no reason to reckon it jumps to a lots-of-sharps key, but from a performance perspective reckoning those middle chords as "B F# B E" seems perfectly natural.
Apr
8
comment Correct notation for a minor chord?
I would expect a typical guitarist of moderate proficiency who's sight reading with a group isn't going to expect see a chord, figure out where it fits in the key, etc. and play it in time with the group. Instead, I would expect the guitarist to see the next chord is "E" and get ready to play 0-2-2-1-0-0 on the proper beat. Some styles of music will require harmonies too complex for sight-readable chords, but in cases where sight-readable chords would sound decent (if not optimal), big bold enharmomically-simplified chords would be helpful.
Apr
8
comment Correct notation for a minor chord?
@Gizmo: If you could do so without overly cluttering the page, perhaps having a big bold enharmonic chord and then a small-print notation or footnote reference with the "technically correct" chord might be helpful, especially if music would sometimes be performed in a sight-reading or near-sight-reading situations, and might sometimes be performed by a group that wanted to analyze the music and fill out chords in more calculated fashion.
Apr
8
comment Correct notation for a minor chord?
@Tim: Neither Abm nor G#m is a very common chord on guitar, but the "black key" notes can go either way. I think Cb and Fb, however, are pretty obscure--especially since the latter wouldn't even be a normal key signature.
Apr
7
answered Correct notation for a minor chord?
Apr
6
answered When tuning a guitar, should you always end with tightening the string rather than loosening it?
Apr
3
comment Do the F clef and G clef always reside on the same line?
I've also seen tenor parts printed with a C-clef bracketing the second space (equivalent to a treble clef one octave down).
Feb
28
answered Do weighted keys on a keyboard lead to more expressive playing?
Feb
28
comment Why digital piano has more polyphony voices than there are keys on the keyboard?
@keshlam: Before the generator is recycled for a different pitch, certainly, but if a note is restruck that should essentially nullify its earlier vibrations, should it not?
Feb
3
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
21
awarded  Yearling
Jan
8
answered In jazz, can anyone play any song?
Jan
6
answered Power chord: Can the lower fifth be used?