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  • 33 votes cast
Dec
29
comment Nylon strings for alternative tunings on hollowbody electric
I like the sound of the string I'm using for the "D" better than I like the sound of a wound fourth string; I would estimate that a J3103 would require a tension of about 7.2, which would be far less excessively loose than some other tensions the table gives. If there aren't any unwound strings that are much heavier than what I'm using, I'd rather use what I have than use a wound string, but if I could find an unwound string that would be nice. Normal tuning uses a 3+3 split I think to ensure that even a "D" chord will have a boomy-sounding bass, but...
Dec
29
answered What is the relationship between the melody line and the rhythm chords?
Dec
29
comment Nylon strings for alternative tunings on hollowbody electric
None of the charts for unwound nylon go down to "d"; should I figure it will be a quarter the tension of "d'"? The largest unit weight I see for unwound is .00004795 which is not hugely bigger than their ball-end sets, but might help a little. Do you have any idea how black nylon compares in density with clear?
Dec
29
comment Nylon strings for alternative tunings on hollowbody electric
Thanks. I'd seen the chart, but for whatever reason not noticed the nylon strings. The ball-end strings are given part numbers that look like steel-string gauges, but most nylon strings are given part numbers that look like a set designator plus the "normal" position (1-3 for unwound; 4-6 for wound) except that the "Rectified clear nylon" part of the chart has strings numbered consecutively (but I have no idea of the diameter).
Dec
26
comment new strings always relaxing. how do I speed up this process?
@MichaelEaster: The question doesn't specify whether the OP is using a classical or steel-string guitar. The linked question seems to concern itself with the latter, so a question about nylon-string guitars would not seem like a duplicate.
Dec
26
comment How do I properly stretch my newly strung strings?
I don't think the proper material for classical guitar strings is spring steel; the nylon strings I've used stretch a noticeable fraction of an inch within a few days of installation before they start to be reasonably stable, and from what I understand that's typical. Having a device or means expedite the "breaking in" period would be helpful.
Dec
26
comment Can I use strings for bridge pins on a non-bridge pin guitar?
What information did you find about nylon strings and tensions? As noted on another question, I'd like to find some nylon strings that would work well for a 2+4 bass/treble split [with the fourth string being an unwound "D"]. Also, out of curiosity, what sort of string gauge were you assuming for the steel strings? I would expect that a set of 8/38 strings would probably only require about half the tension of a set of 12/56; there may not be any overlap between the lightest steel strings and the heaviest nylon strings, but I wouldn't be surprised if they were close.
Dec
26
comment Is there diference between black and white nylon in guitar strings?
Do you have any idea how the densities of different materials compare? For example, would if black string and clear string of a certain diameter were set to the same tension, which would produce a higher pitch?
Dec
26
comment Nylon strings for alternative tunings on hollowbody electric
@BobBroadley: Like many hollowbody electrics, it has acoustical pickups. The nylon strings are quieter than steel strings, but when using amplification it's not necessary that the guitar itself be very loud.
Dec
26
asked Nylon strings for alternative tunings on hollowbody electric
Dec
26
comment What notes are optional in jazz chords?
A dominant seventh with the root omitted is technically a diminished chord on what would be the third of the chord (if the original chord was a G7, that would be a Bdim), but can still behave functionally the same as the dominant seventh. In a G7 to C resolution, the important notes are the B moving up to C, and the F moving down to E. Although one might need a "G" for a "G" chord, it's not an essential part of the sound of a V7-I or V7-i resolution.
Dec
26
comment Beamed note with unfilled heads — What is this?
@PatMuchmore: Is three beams necessarily "unmeasured", or would that depend upon whether the piece used 32nd notes elsewhere and was at a tempo where 32nd notes would be plausible? I would expect that an editor who intended 32nd notes would probably want to include a footnote specifying that, but would there be anything "incorrect" about such notation?
Dec
9
comment “slash” chords, e.g. B/F♯ - are these only for inversions, or can any note be the bass note?
A C/F chord would be expected to have an F in the bass, but have only C's, E's, and G's elsewhere. By contrast, a Csus4/F would be expected to replace all the E's with F's (rather than just having a single F in the bass).
Dec
9
comment “slash” chords, e.g. B/F♯ - are these only for inversions, or can any note be the bass note?
The notation "C/F" represents a "C" chord in some arbitrary inversion (i.e. some arbitrary combination of C's, E's, and G's), with an "F" played in the bass line below it. Such notation is often use to establish a stepwise or chromatic moving bass line which creates and resolves tension with the chords above.
Dec
6
comment What is distinctive about the Hammond B3 organ?
Another competitor to pipe organs and electronic organs would have been the reed organ. Reed organs were a lot cheaper than pipe organs, and depending upon size could have been more or less portable than the Hammond. Looking at some catalogs from the early twentieth century, I would think reed organs could have been price-competitive as well, especially if one was willing to accept a used instrument. Perhaps, though, it would have been more appealing for a church that needed an instrument to buy a new instrument than a "hand-me-down" even if either would have provided good value?
Dec
5
comment Co-wrote song in previous band, can you use it in a new band
It may be worth noting that if the song has been released in recorded form, then anyone wishing to make and sell their own recordings may legally request/demand a compulsory license, which would grant them the right to make and sell recordings in exchange for a per-copy royalties which are presently 1.75 cents per minute, with a 9.1-cent minumum; if the composer and lyricist are different people, they would split the royalty. The other band member would have no right to refuse a request/demand to license the song at the above rates.
Dec
2
comment Is there any name for two melodies that are being played at the same time?
Looking back at my first comment, I see I ommitted a word "What" that might have clarified things; I was intending to ask, for my own interest, whether you know of a recognized term for combinations of independently-composed pieces? I didn't think it worth a separate question (which would most likely get flagged as a duplicate of this) but would like to know if you're aware of such thing.
Dec
1
comment Is there any name for two melodies that are being played at the same time?
A piece of music in which multiple performers play the same notes, but start at different times, might be a form of "counterpoint", but would be more specifically described as a "canon". OP's question (and I'm also curious of the answer) is whether a word or concise phrase has been established as specifically describing a piece which juxtaposes independently-composed melody lines.
Nov
29
comment Is there any name for two melodies that are being played at the same time?
Even if the simultaneous playing of independently-written pieces that happen to fit well together could be considered a form of counterpoint, that would not imply that the term was sufficient to define it. I would think "mashup" might be as good a term as any other, even if it would imply that preexisting recordings were being used (which might not be possible unless recordings existed in matching key and tempo). For example, the first two lines of "Ode to Joy", repeated, will fit very nicely with the "Lone Ranger" part of the William Tell overture, but the "normal" tempos wouldn't fit.
Nov
27
comment Is there any name for two melodies that are being played at the same time?
Normally the term "counterpoint" would imply that at least one of the melodies was deliberately designed to fit with the other. Would be the term to describe cases where the two melodies were composed entirely independently and combined by someone unaffiliated with the composer of either melody?