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Feb
8
comment Which electric guitar strings have the least (pitch) bend
...some of the pieces I like to play have a lot of Db major chords; that's probably the worst chord in my tuning, and D major is the best, so being able to remove the capo when playing such pieces (which generally don't benefit from the nice D major chord) would let them benefit from a nice Db chord.
Feb
8
comment Which electric guitar strings have the least (pitch) bend
Also, incidentally, I just happened to notice that one of the other two guitars I was using, an Ovation acoustic electric, has a neck which is a fret longer than my Yamaha, which is a standard-size acoustic. I'd been finding the Ovation hard to play, but I'm thinking I had the strings too tight since I used the same gauges as my Yamaha. Last night I tried tuning the Ovation down a fourth and found that the strings seemed a little loose, but not outrageously so. I wonder if I should get some slightly lighter strings, tune it down one or two frets, and capo it (since...
Feb
8
comment Which electric guitar strings have the least (pitch) bend
With regard, to fretting behind each fret, am I correct in thinking that if a string is pushed down a certain DISTANCE, the amount be which it will be stretched is minimized if it's pushed midway between frets, but pushing near the fret will serve to reduce the distance by which the string has to be pushed? When using the first finger to bar multiple strings, some strings may have to be pushed further than ideal in order to ensure all the other strings fret cleanly. Should the first finger be moved a little further back to accommodate that?
Feb
8
comment Which electric guitar strings have the least (pitch) bend
@Dave: I had been thinking that I'd choose strings for a lower pitch than normal. I'd figured a 3/4 scale guitar should be a perfect fourth lower, but maybe I should measure its actual length. Pitch is proportional to the square of tension, but inversely proportional to length, right?
Feb
8
comment What's the most useful alternate tuning and why?
@luserdroog: I wrote a vb.net program to generate them, since I didn't know of any utilities that would show the fingerings without "scrolling", and I think it's helpful to see the whole fretboard (though the marks on frets 3, 5, 7, 9, and 12 should perhaps be more visible). I also wanted to call more attention to the fact that the fingers could "overhang" to the right without touching active strings.
Feb
6
comment How to Tune a 10-hole Harmonica?
I think some companies sell reed plate assemblies for something less than the cost of a complete replacement harmonica, so if a reed breaks while trying to tune it, one shouldn't panic. Also, I think reed plates for different keys are interchangeable; one wouldn't expect to swap reed plates every time one changes keys, but if one gets tired of a certain key one might be able to buy another reed plate for a "semi-permanent swap" more cheaply than buying a whole new instrument.
Feb
6
comment When I play the C chord, why does the electronic tuner indicate that it is a G chord?
As one who designs small processor-controlled devices, I would expect that most cheap tuners wouldn't even look for a peak frequency. Instead, they'd convert incoming waves to pulses and measure the times between them, probably using a little logic to filter out extraneous pulses, and then report a pitch based upon the average time between pulses. The cheapest way to design a tuner's input circuitry would behave much like a guitar amp with the overdrive cranked to yield massive distortion. A single note would have a clearly-identifiable pitch, but chords would turn to mud.
Feb
6
comment Learn guitar chords?
Using a custom tuning, I taught myself to play four-string chords in all inversions, and got a lot of enjoyment from being able to do that before I figured out how to go beyond four strings. I would think a similar approach might be useful with standard tuning: get to be able to play any chord in at least some form (possibly inverted), and then augment one's repertoire with better forms. Four-string playing with inverted chords gave me a sense of how notes move in some progressions which I hadn't noticed in decades of playing them on the keyboard.
Feb
6
comment Learn guitar chords?
Add another sharp to the key signature of whatever you're playing and add an E chord to the repertoire, perhaps, to stay consistent with using open chords, and once one is going to suggest a 4-string barre chord, offer up two of them some distance apart, even if one has to be an inverted form, and suggest that they can be used to play any chord for which a better form is unavailable.
Feb
6
comment Which electric guitar strings have the least (pitch) bend
Would you like to discuss a this in chat? We're getting a bit beyond the scope of the original question, but it sounds like you have useful information.
Feb
5
comment Some acoustic guitars are easy to play but some aren't. What affects playability?
I use a rather unusual custom tuning and playing style. If I take my guitar for a setup, what would be the best way of ensuring that it ends up being compatible with the way I play? I'd hate to end up with an action so low that it's hard to play without it buzzing all the time.
Feb
5
comment Which electric guitar strings have the least (pitch) bend
@WheatWilliams: The guitar guy at a local store sold me a set of Ernie Ball strings chosen to yield reasonable tensions for my custom tuning (G-D-D-F-G#-B as 40-52-28-22W-16-12 I think), which were a big improvement over the stock strings. The bridge has per-string fore-aft adjustments, but not elevation, so it would seem that going bigger would increase the height discrepancies there unless I can do something about the bridge (it comes off when the strings are removed, but I don't know whether it would be interchangeable, and what other options would be available).
Feb
5
comment Which electric guitar strings have the least (pitch) bend
If a professional setup would really help things, I wouldn't mind spending a few bucks, but I don't know how well a technician would set up an instrument for a tuning and playing style as unusual as mine (G-D-D-F-G#-B), playing mostly with the fronts of the finger rather than the tips. A useless technique for normal tuning, and not amenable to virtuosity, but enjoyable and comfortable (playing frequently for over a year with no callouses).
Feb
5
comment Which electric guitar strings have the least (pitch) bend
The guitar I use most is a $170 3/4 scale electric (I bought a 3/4 scale for easy traveling, and I've decided I like how it "feels"; I know getting consistent intonation out of a 3/4 scale is going to be harder than out of a larger instrument, but I'd like to do what I can). I very seldom get any buzz, so lowering the action might help, but I'm not sure how best to accomplish that. My low "D" (5th) string rides high, since the bridge has six saddles that adjust front-to-back but not vertically, and the 5th string grove is smaller than the 6th string grove even though my 5th string is big.
Feb
5
asked Which electric guitar strings have the least (pitch) bend
Feb
5
comment What's the most useful alternate tuning and why?
The D chord looks like it spells D-A-F#-A-D-F#; interesting spelling. Looks a little awkward, though.
Feb
5
comment Why is the guitar tuned like it is?
I wouldn't exactly call the guitar's chords "easy", though I've tried writing an experimental program to identify what barre chords would be available for a tuning given certain constraints (e.g. up to three fingers doing one note each, within 3 frets of the "bar"), and standard tuning comes out pretty decently, with two 6-string, two 5-string, and one four-string barre chord for major. Many other tunings end up with far fewer possibilities.
Feb
5
revised What guitar tunings allow many chords without fretting between “live” strings
added 6 characters in body
Feb
5
answered What's the most useful alternate tuning and why?
Feb
4
comment Learn guitar chords?
Basing everything on the A and E barre chords is conceptually simple and intuitive (to play a chord, find the note on the 5th or 6th string and then pick a chord shape based upon which string you used) but those chords are rather difficult to play. Do you know any people who actually started with them? I invented a tuning which offers two barre chords a fourth apart (D and G), but with really easy fingerings for major, minor, 7th versions of both. The fingering for a first-inversion chord is also easy, so for a D chord I use a first-inversion chord plus an open low D string.