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Apr
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comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
@leftaroundabout No, it is not because you are not suppose to make wrong notes. Again, I said it was the goal. The worse of a musician you are the more you'll need to hear yourself. If I know a solo then I know it note for note and I know when I play it right and when I play it wrong, even if I didn't hear it at all. Ultimately you are suppose to be hearing everything in your head. The goal is to be so rehearsed that you don't need to hear anything except a click and still be able to play great except for dynamics.
Mar
29
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Mar
28
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
@supercat Again, I am speaking ideally. I mentioned it does not work as well width wedges and the louder the volume the worse it gets. Most "real" bands go in ears because wedges screw up the house mix 99% of the time. I am not arguing that of practicality but simply if you want to achieve the best musicianship the band can everyone will work off the house mix(using in-ears with minor personal tweaks, nothing drastic). The ideal case is working directly off the house mix with the best quality in-ears. It is the goal, not a starting point.
Mar
27
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
Just because X is hard to hear doesn't mean you have to turn X up. Maybe it is suppose to be hard to hear(e.g., for it to fix in the mix properly) or maybe everything else is too loud(the original question).
Mar
27
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
Again, the main issue is that if the monitor mix is to far out, which usually is the case from musicians that do not understand acoustics and sound engineering and have bad ears(usually from years of too loud music), it is detrimental to the whole mix. I'm not really talking about what has to be, as obviously one has to do what is required... I'm talking about the ideal setup. If you have a group of young musicians starting out without ear damage and have a good sense of aesthetic and musicianship then playing off the house mix is the best way for them to develop their ability.
Mar
27
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
@supercat I've never heard of anyone using such a large delay, in any case, even 10ms can be too much. Most live effects are much less(1ms or less).
Mar
27
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Mar
27
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
The solution: Use the house mix in wedges with only slight increase in the listener's own instrument level(not too much). This requires in-ears or personal wedges to work well. The "More Me" syndrome is a real sign that someone is a weak link.
Mar
27
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
Realize that I am talking about the ideal scenario... obviously most musicians do not practice properly to achieve near this... but by working off a house mix can help train the ears. Again, the main issue is this: If you are not hearing the house mix then how can you know if it sounds bad or not? If your mix is totally different then chances are you are doing things that are going to be counter to achieving a good house mix(playing softer when you should play harder, etc...).
Mar
27
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
e.g., if you are playing the wrong lick or even out of key but it doesn't make the house mix sound bad then it isn't wrong, again, assuming you have the ears and aesthetic to make that judgement. Generally we simply want to hear our self's so we can make that judgement easier but it can actually hurt more than help. (because we might overplay or underplay.. if it's really loud in our ears we might back off the dynamics and then drop out of the house mix completely... then it requires the sound guy to try and fix the problem)
Mar
27
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
as far as the other stuff, the musicians should know there parts and ideally sing it blind(or rather deaf). I know this is impossible but ultimately it is what one wants to achieve. For example, suppose you are a guitar player and on one song you have to play a part that is more rhythmic and barely audible(a little scratchy thing). It obviously adds to the overall sound... but if you have to hear yourself to make sure you are playing the right thing then maybe you need to woodshed more. If the house mix sounds good, whatever you are doing, then it's not necessarily bad though.
Mar
27
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
@supercat: the detune example was hypothetical to point out simply that ultimately the house mix is what matters. If the musicians are not hearing the house mix then they may do things that take away from it. If they are hearing something completely different in their ears then what would one expect(this could be a good thing if their ears are bad though).
Mar
26
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
My point is simply that the house mix is the best. It allows the musician to be the best they can be and teaches them proper aesthetic. One person can screw it up though if they suck and the other musicians will know if they have a good aesthetic and ear. Of course, if anyone's ear sucks then it is a problem. I'm really talking about the ideal case. Most people will need the house mix + a slight alteration(either just a little boost of their instrument and/or slight EQ adjustments). Any significant deviation from that suggests someone has issues and will only detract from the band/sound.
Mar
26
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
I will give a simple thought proof: Suppose you are running through a vocal box that happens, by accident, detune your vocals in the house mix. Suppose you could have an in-ear mix that does not detune them(pre-vocal box). Now, if you are listening to that mix you will be out of tune in the house, if you listen to the house mix you will be in-tune. In the first case you think you are sounding great, but are not, in the second case you will sound correct to everyone else listening(which is the point, right?).
Mar
26
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
The point is rather simple. The house mix is the final mix. If you have great ears, ability, and aesthetic then you want to hear the house mix so whatever you add to it will be the true result. If you have some other mix you will add things that might not work in the house mix but might work in that mix and hence be counter productive. If you do not have the ears, ability, or aesthetic, then of course there are issues.
Mar
26
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
@supercat: If the person is a little flat it means they are not as good as a musician as they need to be if they are not doing it intentionally. Of course no one is perfect but if he is a little flat and it sounds good in the mix then it is ok. Ultimately the house mix is the most important, right? If the singer, say, is using the house mix, and he thinks he sounds good in it then, either he is, or he isn't. If he is and everyone agree's then it's ok if he's flat or not. If he isn't then either he think's he is, doesn't have a good ear, or need's to practice his pitch perception.
Mar
26
comment Stage volume levels in rehearsal and performance
@tim good musicians should only have to hear the house mix to work off of. This gives the best overall sound. The soundman can't do it all and ultimately the musicians should know what type of sound they are after. For example, if the backup vocals have too much of their own vocal(because they "need it" to sing in harmony) then how can they ear the main vocals well enough to know they are blending properly? The sound man then has to get the mix right. Now the sound man has to ride the fader(s) all night because there will be no consistency due to everyone changing their volume level.