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Mar
9
revised How does one read very loud or very soft dynamic markings (e.g. ffff, ppp)?
said -- sixth.
Feb
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
25
awarded  Yearling
Jan
24
revised How common is the complete circle of fifths progression?
edited for generality.
Jan
12
comment Any quick way to know if my tune is already used?
no comment on the vote down?
Jan
3
answered Any quick way to know if my tune is already used?
Dec
23
comment Who is the successor of Schnittke?
Depending on what aspect of Schnittke's work, Sofia Gubaidulina is a decent choice. She has played with the juxtaposition of past and present and pastiche in her work.
Dec
22
comment Is 'Gianni Schicchi' the shortest well-known opera ever written?
I don't understand the off-topic nature; it is about performance and history. The precise definition of "commonly performed" might be more for music fans, but I don't think the question is mainly about that.
Dec
22
revised What's the earliest known piece of polyphonic music?
edited tags
Dec
22
comment What's the earliest known piece of polyphonic music?
Great answer! The lack of precise pitch notation except in the enchiriadis treatises limits the number of performable polyphonic pieces that I would expect to find. Between these pieces there are some other important repertories; google Winchester Troper or Aquitanian Polyphony. We are also talking about polyphony in the Western (European) style; heterophony probably predates any of these in many traditions.
Dec
22
comment Why do baroque operas tend to have postmodernist stage designs?
Voted up as a brilliant answer: supported by the literature on baroque opera staging; not primarily opinion-based.
Nov
29
comment What does the “+” symbol mean in a keyboard piece when attached to a note?
In some musical pieces since around 1980 the sign is used to indicate a stopped or muted note on the piano -- place a finger near the pegs on the strings to be struck. It creates a muted sound. I've never seen it used for pizz. on a piano. In this older example, however, the accepted answer is the correct interpretation.
Nov
10
reviewed Reviewed Good books for romantic/contemporary period performance?
Oct
21
awarded  Necromancer
Oct
20
revised Electronic Wind Instrument technique resources
Add more specific question to be less broad. Define EWI
Oct
20
reviewed Leave Open Electronic Wind Instrument technique resources
Oct
19
revised What are the limitations of the ABC notation format?
add one more paragraph.
Oct
19
comment Why is a note sometimes a 4th and sometimes an 11th?
The 6/3 inversion is commonly called 6. It's most often used w/ a roman numeral (I6, V6) but still often called with its root name, as in C6 or G6, in American classical music theory classes. The 6/4 inversion is always called 6-4. The rock C6 chord would either be called C65 or C(add)13. As normative behavior of what it should be called, you may be right, but as a description of what classical musicians and theorists call it, I think you'll find that lots of texts disagree.
Oct
19
comment Why is a note sometimes a 4th and sometimes an 11th?
@Tim -- in Classical music contexts, C/E is called a 6 chord. Hence why it's confusing.
Oct
19
revised What Moods have been associated with D-Flat major?
rephrase to be more musicological than opinion-based.