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Dec
10
comment History of Russian Clarinet/Bass Clarinet low notes
Wow!!! Thank you! I'll try to get that info from the NYPL next time I'm there for research or see if the Harvard library (just down the street here) either has them or would acquire them. This is awesome!!
Dec
7
comment History of Russian Clarinet/Bass Clarinet low notes
I looked through the Rachmaninov -- the lowest note on the Bb part is F# and the lowest in the A is E, so it doesn't tell us that there were lower notes than E at the time. I went through Rosenkavalier again (was my personal nightmare: playing basset horn and bass clarinet in A in bass clef on a Bb bass): no low notes for the Bb part; the A goes only down to E-natural. (The basset horn, OTOH, uses the whole range to low C often).
Dec
7
comment History of Russian Clarinet/Bass Clarinet low notes
Speaking of odd low clarinet keys. In one work, Schoenberg calls for contrabass clarinet in A. An instrument that as far as anyone has been able to find, never existed.
Dec
7
comment History of Russian Clarinet/Bass Clarinet low notes
I'm speaking entirely in the pitch of the instrument, not concert pitch. Thanks. The low C of Bb would actually be a Db in the A bass clarinet. I'm not sure if bass clarinets in A ever went below Eb or even E.
Nov
30
comment Are whole notes/rests really used to signify variable lengths of time?
One caveat -- a whole-bar rest is always positioned in the middle of the bar in good modern typesetting. If you play from 19th c. or earlier scores, you will often find no distinction made in the positioning of whole-note rests and whole-bar rests.
Nov
30
comment How are note durations named in the British system?
The hook does, however, still appear for quarter notes in the form of the old style ("French") quarter rest (an eighth rest facing the opposite direction).
Nov
30
comment How are note durations named in the British system?
As Bartek and Mark noted, the OED only gives examples of English usage; the usage of semibreve goes to the 13th c. in France and minim (originally semibrevis minima -- or the smallest possible semibreve) appears in the early 14th c. The semiminim appears not much later (Karen Cook just wrote a diss. on it). In English usage (Morley 1597) "Large" replaces Maxima. At that time there was not a filled/hollowed note distinction, so the semiminim or "quarter" really did have a hook ("crotchet"); after the note colors changed (c. 1420-50) the hook got passed to the next smaller note.
Nov
30
comment History of Russian Clarinet/Bass Clarinet low notes
Yes, only bass clarinetists there. Few clarinetists have a basset clarinet (to low C; useful for historically informed performances of the Mozart clarinet concerto and quintet), and I've never met anyone who had a basset in Bb (useful only for one solo in La Clemenza di Tito).
Nov
29
comment Is this piece of renaissance music really in the locrian mode?
It looks to me much more likely that it's an upper voice over a D phrygian tenor, an octave below at the start and a fifth below at the cadence. That'd be interesting and also rare for the time.
Oct
11
comment Why is the note name “a” not on any important scale position?
It's also a duplicate of music.stackexchange.com/questions/7203/…
Aug
15
comment Is Dalcrose Eurhythmics appropriate for beginning performers?
I tried to reword so that the questions asked in the main text ask for citations rather than entirely opinion-based answers. Both answers give some evidence, so the question now fits more closely.
Jan
12
comment Any quick way to know if my tune is already used?
no comment on the vote down?
Dec
23
comment Who is the successor of Schnittke?
Depending on what aspect of Schnittke's work, Sofia Gubaidulina is a decent choice. She has played with the juxtaposition of past and present and pastiche in her work.
Dec
22
comment What's the earliest known piece of polyphonic music?
Great answer! The lack of precise pitch notation except in the enchiriadis treatises limits the number of performable polyphonic pieces that I would expect to find. Between these pieces there are some other important repertories; google Winchester Troper or Aquitanian Polyphony. We are also talking about polyphony in the Western (European) style; heterophony probably predates any of these in many traditions.
Dec
22
comment Why do baroque operas tend to have postmodernist stage designs?
Voted up as a brilliant answer: supported by the literature on baroque opera staging; not primarily opinion-based.
Nov
29
comment What does the “+” symbol mean in a keyboard piece when attached to a note?
In some musical pieces since around 1980 the sign is used to indicate a stopped or muted note on the piano -- place a finger near the pegs on the strings to be struck. It creates a muted sound. I've never seen it used for pizz. on a piano. In this older example, however, the accepted answer is the correct interpretation.
Oct
19
comment Why is a note sometimes a 4th and sometimes an 11th?
The 6/3 inversion is commonly called 6. It's most often used w/ a roman numeral (I6, V6) but still often called with its root name, as in C6 or G6, in American classical music theory classes. The 6/4 inversion is always called 6-4. The rock C6 chord would either be called C65 or C(add)13. As normative behavior of what it should be called, you may be right, but as a description of what classical musicians and theorists call it, I think you'll find that lots of texts disagree.
Oct
19
comment Why is a note sometimes a 4th and sometimes an 11th?
@Tim -- in Classical music contexts, C/E is called a 6 chord. Hence why it's confusing.
Oct
19
comment What are the limitations of the ABC notation format?
There's the opus file format for MusicXML and the multiple \score block coding for Lilypond, but for simplicity in creating medleys of tunes (and support for parsing), nothing beats ABC.
Oct
18
comment Why is a note sometimes a 4th and sometimes an 11th?
This is correct for rock/pop. A "6 chord" in classical music omits the 5, but does not have the same function as the normal (root position) chord. The function is the same as the chord built on the 6 (i.e., as in a C/E chord)