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comment Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
This was a good answer, thanks. The reason I asked this question, was because I was writing a program that given a chord name, it would tell you what the associated intervals / spelling was. I was debating what was the best way to handle slash chords, and thought perhaps it didn't need to show the interval of the slash note for the reasons I mentioned. Being a fellow software guy, is that the approach you would take?
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comment Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
I'd like to know more of these mixed-third chords you speak of ;) Will have to do some reading.
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comment Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
@MatthewRead True. I think what I meant to say is the chord spellings I have seen don't contain both minor and major thirds. (where the intervals really are written as 3 and ♭3, not 3 and #9). As Owen S. says, I am probably incorrect in that understanding though.
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revised Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
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comment Learning Guitar by hearing
One last tip: when I improv, I play dud notes all the time :) But the secret it to not dwell on it - a note not in key is not a bad thing. You can use it to your advantage - for example, the a note out of key will create dissonance/tension. If you can resolve that tension, it will sound OK, and probably kind of cool. The trick is that if you play an "outside" note, you just have to remember that the "correct" note was either one semitone above or one semitone below. I.e. just quickly move back one or forward one fret. Once you get used to this, you realise there is no such thing as a bad note