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seen Jun 27 at 1:37

Jan
5
asked Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
Dec
18
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
7
asked What are some small, lightweight, electric guitars that are ultra portable?
Jun
1
awarded  Yearling
Feb
25
comment Learning Guitar by hearing
One last tip: when I improv, I play dud notes all the time :) But the secret it to not dwell on it - a note not in key is not a bad thing. You can use it to your advantage - for example, the a note out of key will create dissonance/tension. If you can resolve that tension, it will sound OK, and probably kind of cool. The trick is that if you play an "outside" note, you just have to remember that the "correct" note was either one semitone above or one semitone below. I.e. just quickly move back one or forward one fret. Once you get used to this, you realise there is no such thing as a bad note
Feb
25
comment Learning Guitar by hearing
Or you can just go at it by yourself. Pick a key or a scale, or a chord progression. Then just experiment - play just random things within those boundaries. Some things will work, others wont. If something starts working, then build off that. The key is to listen to what you're playing, as you're playing it. You should have a goal in mind, like where you want the melody / harmony to go. With time, you'll get better at "guessing" which notes to play. Lastly, I would say - just listen to as many improv performances as you can.
Feb
25
comment Learning Guitar by hearing
First, those vids were not improvisational as such. They weren't playing by ear - they had learnt those songs beforehand ;) The thing about jamming, is that the inspiration comes from either within you, other people you're playing with, or music that you're listening to. You can jam over the top of other people's records, or get some backing tracks.
Feb
19
accepted “slash” chords, e.g. B/F♯ - are these only for inversions, or can any note be the bass note?
Feb
16
comment “slash” chords, e.g. B/F♯ - are these only for inversions, or can any note be the bass note?
Thanks. When I see F/G I think that it could be written as Fadd9 or Fadd9/G, and C/G♯ could be written as G#maj7♯5. But you're saying that if a G♯maj7♯5 is functioning as a C chord in a progression, then it can be better to write it as C/G♯ ?
Feb
15
revised “slash” chords, e.g. B/F♯ - are these only for inversions, or can any note be the bass note?
added 62 characters in body
Feb
15
asked “slash” chords, e.g. B/F♯ - are these only for inversions, or can any note be the bass note?
Jan
29
answered Learning Guitar by hearing
Nov
26
comment What is the full list of possible chord names? Are there chords that don't have a name in chord theory?
@Iuser droog - 11th chords generally have the 3rd omitted
Nov
16
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
20
revised What is the full list of possible chord names? Are there chords that don't have a name in chord theory?
edited body
Aug
20
asked Can a chord contain both the C and C♯ notes? (as opposed to containing C and D♭ notes)
Aug
20
asked What is the full list of possible chord names? Are there chords that don't have a name in chord theory?
Aug
20
accepted What notes are optional in jazz chords?
Aug
19
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
17
awarded  Supporter