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16h
comment Why do people sometimes write notes as E♯ or C♭?
+1. This is probably too advanced for the topic, but I came to think about the scales which DO have the same tone name twice. The altered scale, for example, has a b9, a #9, and a perfect 3rd. You can't accommodate for that without having two tones with the same name, or spelling the third as a diminished fourth (ouch >:( ).
17h
answered Why rootless chords?
17h
comment What is this trumpet attachment called?
Further, there's no such liquid (salive/water) coming from the bottom of the valves. It'd be oil. And given the volume of the thing shown in the picture, that'd be a LOT of oil.
17h
comment What is this trumpet attachment called?
Note that the liquid that you remove from brass instruments with the water key is more water from the player's breath that condensed in contact with the tubing, rather than saliva. Sure, there's saliva in the mix as well, but it's mostly water. Or so I wish to believe ;)
2d
awarded  Yearling
Apr
20
accepted Key choice for brass instruments
Apr
20
comment How to make a dal capo/segno include repeats?
@joseem Musescore is mainly a notation program. Playback is a useful feature, but is merely there as a help to notate. If playback features are what matters to you, you could change the music as you suggest, but it won't look as good for live musicians. If you don't plan to print the music and give it to musicians, you might be using the wrong tool for the job. Look into sequencers (Rosegarden?) in that case.
Apr
19
comment Key choice for brass instruments
@tim, the horns sound best in their open position, and the more valve tubing added, the worst they sound. I guess it has to do with where vibration nodes and bellies appear on the instrument. As soon as you add a valve, the shape of the instrument becomes more complex, nodes are at suboptimal places, and the instrument sounds worse. I guess you could make an instrument optimized for the all valves in position, though. But the shape of the tube being less "natural" than open, I suppose the all-pressed position on that wouldn't sound as nice as current instruments in open.
Apr
18
answered How to make a dal capo/segno include repeats?
Apr
18
comment Wind instruments and sharp keys
It feels like you might have the knowledge to answer this question: music.stackexchange.com/q/39970/63
Apr
18
comment Wind instruments and sharp keys
"brass instruments with valves, the "best sounding" keys have a few flats more than the natural key of the instrument": is that because C# comes earlier than Db in the series of sharps resp. flats, and that fingering 123 is too sharp on brass instruments? If no, what acoustic compromises do you mean?
Apr
6
comment What is this trumpet attachment called?
@EverettSteed: that would make a fine answer. Her sleeve suggests she suffers some kind of injury. No need to be a broken arm, though, it could be strain from holding a trumpet several hours a day every day.
Apr
6
answered How to give music a sense of “musical direction”?
Dec
22
revised Does this cadence have a name?
Correct the picture
Dec
22
comment Does this cadence have a name?
@Dom: I don't think this short extract sounds very modern? Not jazzy, not bluesy.
Dec
22
comment Does this cadence have a name?
@Shevliaskovic: I wrote the arrangement, and this ending is mine. Measures 3 and 4 are not present in the original composition, measures 1, 2, 5, 6 have the same melody and harmony as the original (which is written for male choir). Common practice was my ambition, but I am not sure the original piece and its harmony make it possible, especially the B7-5 and following tristan chord.
Dec
22
revised Does this cadence have a name?
added 71 characters in body
Dec
22
comment Does this cadence have a name?
Aren't Picardie cadences supposed to end a piece? Are they still Picardie cadences with the third as the bass?
Dec
22
comment Does this cadence have a name?
@Tim: the seventh does nullify the perfect cadence hypothesis, and so does the inversion (which erroneously doesn't show in the chord notation, as NeilMeyer pointed out). The piece continues with a repeat of measures 3 and 4, and ends in a perfect cadence. But I wrote that.
Dec
22
asked Does this cadence have a name?