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May
27
comment Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
Nice edit, I would like to upvote it one more time :) . I thought of one more case worth a thought. The minor harmonic scale is very common in western music, yet the major seventh is noted as an accidental (there is no other way if you want to use the common key signatures, with signs in the right order and without omission). This would be in favor of having one sharp in the key signature of G mixolydian. If you do it for harmonic minor, why not for the other modes...
May
26
comment Why do people say “you are a little flat” and never “you are are a little sharp”?
@Alex: I think the OP wonders if singing out of tune too low is more common than too high. Not if the expression "a little sharp" is used or not.
May
26
comment Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
To be more precise, the H and B convention of being B and Bb is in European countries with German based languages. Germany and Scandinavia, for example. In latin-European countries such as Italy and France, fixed-do is used and the notes are called do re mi fa sol la si/ti (according to wikipedia, that is the case "In the major Romance and Slavic languages"). I just wanted to point out that there are differences within Europe :)
May
26
comment Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
The mode based on E with a G sharp sounds like A harmonic minor, only based on E.
May
26
comment Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
Interesting, both sharps and flats in the same key signature! I wonder what notation programs can do it.
May
26
comment Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
Yes, that's another problem. When you come to that amount of sharps in the key signature, you don't really count them. I would just assume the tonality from the start of the piece, which is not good.
May
26
comment Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
How about modes that are none of the above? For example super locrian? I do agree that I prefer having an empty key signature for G mixolydian, I changed this in songs where I realised that the low 7th went unnoticed. It's easy to associate dorian and phrygian to minor, and mixolydian and lydian to major. To follow my reasoning, I'd write D phrygian with D minor key signature and add Eb as accidentals. But as a reader I'd prefer two flats in the key signature, just as you said.
May
26
comment Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
And to extend the question, how would you then show B-super locrian in the key signature? Only Eb, with no Bb?
May
26
comment Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
It is indeed so. I feel that I can recognise the mode, but not everyone can. And as I mentioned, some people tend to miss that and fall back automatically to G-major.
May
25
comment What are good techniques to bend notes on brass instruments
@ogerard: triggers give a rather small range (max half tone), don't they?
May
25
answered What are good techniques to bend notes on brass instruments
May
25
asked Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
May
25
comment Capitalization of key names (C Minor vs. c minor)
C and Cm for chords, do you see that for keys too?
May
25
comment Capitalization of key names (C Minor vs. c minor)
+1: "who was Dorian?" :)
May
25
comment How do I train myself to sing pure vowels?
Interesting. It seems so strange that pronouncing only one vowel could be harder than pronouncing two (diphthong), to a non-native english speaker.
May
25
comment How do I begin finally making music on the piano?
Nice writing. Have you considered that your level may not have gone down, only you are more picky with what you hear? Your expectations might go up faster that your playing level?
May
23
comment Trumpet low C♯ and D
Adding percentages should work if using a common reference (here the length for C). If you add 3 % of 100 (that is 3) to 6 % of 100 (that is 6), it's the same as adding 9 % of 100 (9). This stops working if you have 3 % increase, then additionally 6 % on top of it. In that case the first added 3 % get into the input of the 6 %, which they don't do if the reference is common. Regarding the specifics of the instrument, it's just adding tube length.
May
22
comment Trumpet low C♯ and D
Thank you for the long answer. I do understand that due to the logarithmic nature of intervals vs. wavelength, the sum of tubing for one tone down and for one half tone down won't be the correct sum of extra tubing for 1.5 tone down. That is what I meant with: if F# and F are in tune, the sum of the extra tubing won't make E exactly in tune. Nice that you could quantify the length compromise in cents! And a very interesting comment on the harmonic series being out of tune. This question arised from a bass trombone slide position chart, actually.
May
22
comment Trumpet low C♯ and D
Trumpet players pull the third valve "live" on D and C#. You don't need to tune your valves for an optimal tuning on all tones, if you can move one of them on the fly (trombone players used to make fun of me for moving my ridiculously little slide on some tones :) ).
May
20
comment Transition from tenor to bass trombone
I asked the question in a trumpet viewpoint, and did find things I do not quite understand. Question here