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Jan
20
comment What Does a Compressor Pedal Do?
I feel even more silly to have written my answer, I should have read yours more thoroughly before. I mainly wrote it so I could include a graph.
Jan
20
answered What Does a Compressor Pedal Do?
Dec
20
comment Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
Welcome here! The leading tone in minor harmonic mode is noted as accidental. As I wrote in an earlier comment, super locrian and super lydian cannot be noted without accidentals (if you don't allow for very strange key signatures). If we accept accidentals for harmonic minor, super locrian, super lydian, and what not, then I guess we could accept it for lydian and other church modes...
Dec
19
comment What is the relationship between “do re mi” and note letter names?
The alternative phonetic names for sharp and flat are not in use in fixed doh countries (see the table "Traditional fixed do" in your link to Wikipedia). In France at least, the altered notes are named in a way very similar to the anglo-saxon way: C sharp is "do dièse", B flat is "si bémol". When singing and naming the notes' name at the same time, the alteration is discarded (you would sing the syllable "si" while singing a B flat).
Dec
19
comment What is the relationship between “do re mi” and note letter names?
The sound of music did the same thing later on :)
Dec
19
comment What is the relationship between “do re mi” and note letter names?
Also interesting, the do re mi syllables come from a song in latin. Each phrase starts on a different tone, starting with the tonic for the first phrase, and one step up for every phrase. The first syllables of every phrases give: ut re mi fa so la si ut. I do not know when, where, and why ut got changed to do. A source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solf%C3%A8ge
Dec
19
comment What is the relationship between “do re mi” and note letter names?
Interesting to note: in some languages (french, italian, spanish), the do-ré-mi are actually note names. Do is C, ré is D, mi is E, and so on.
Dec
19
answered Trying to program a piano staff/stave. Is this what it's supposed to look like?
Dec
16
comment How do harmonics work?
+1, nice. To generalize: all harmonics which do not have a node where you place your finger will be muted. Let n be the least number of string divisions that put a node under your finger. The harmonics that are n * k * f0 (for all k in natural numbers, and f0 the frequency of the open string) are the ones that are not muted. For example if the least number of divisions for your finger placement is 3, the unmuted harmonics are (3 * f0), (6 * f0), (9 * f0), and so on. I should add a 4b in my graphic, showing that (6 * f0) is also present.
Dec
12
awarded  Necromancer
Dec
9
awarded  Editor
Dec
9
revised How do harmonics work?
added 4 characters in body
Dec
9
comment How do harmonics work?
@Matthew: I completed your math approach with a more engineery approach in a separate answer :) I think they are not contradictory.
Dec
9
answered How do harmonics work?
Dec
9
accepted Naming convention for trumpet mouthpiece size
Dec
9
comment Trumpet low C♯ and D
I like this concise answer. See the edit in my question (I put it as an answer put it was moved back), the problem is that increasing the wavelength for lowering a note should be done in percent of the reference wavelength. Increasing tube length in valve instrument is done with constant lengths instead.
Dec
9
awarded  Scholar
Dec
9
accepted Trumpet low C♯ and D
Dec
6
comment Why are the notes in a key signature in a specific order?
I never heard about the circle of fourths? For me it's still fifth, only going in the other direction. I like seeing it as a double circle, going from 7b (one o'clock) to 7# (11 o'clock), through zero (12 o'clock). Alternatively, showing all 15 in one circle, with overlap for B major / Cb major, F# major / Gb major, and so on.
Nov
8
comment What chord is formed by the open strings of a guitar in standard (EADGBe) tuning?
Note that sus chords do not always lack the third. When they have it, it is generally at a higher octave than the 4. (Source: Marc Levine's "The jazz piano book".)