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Dec
22
comment Does this cadence have a name?
@Dom: I don't think this short extract sounds very modern? Not jazzy, not bluesy.
Dec
22
comment Does this cadence have a name?
@Shevliaskovic: I wrote the arrangement, and this ending is mine. Measures 3 and 4 are not present in the original composition, measures 1, 2, 5, 6 have the same melody and harmony as the original (which is written for male choir). Common practice was my ambition, but I am not sure the original piece and its harmony make it possible, especially the B7-5 and following tristan chord.
Dec
22
comment Does this cadence have a name?
Aren't Picardie cadences supposed to end a piece? Are they still Picardie cadences with the third as the bass?
Dec
22
comment Does this cadence have a name?
@Tim: the seventh does nullify the perfect cadence hypothesis, and so does the inversion (which erroneously doesn't show in the chord notation, as NeilMeyer pointed out). The piece continues with a repeat of measures 3 and 4, and ends in a perfect cadence. But I wrote that.
Dec
9
comment brass: bending notes upwards
Oh, and I do use this with no half valves, in big band situation. For example, bending down then immediately back (the accent looks like a u).
Dec
9
comment Key choice for brass instruments
@jjmusicnotes? Only instrument, how about French horn, tubas? I'm not sure why flat keys resonate better with the fundamental of the (open?) instrument? Why would written Bb major (one whole tone below open) resonate better than A major (one and a half tone), and A major worse than Ab major?
Dec
9
comment Key choice for brass instruments
Which partial a tone builds on is nothing you think about when you play, especially if you've been playing since you were a kid. C# comes earlier than Db in the list of key signatures.
Dec
7
comment Key choice for brass instruments
It is from the viewpoint of the arranger that I am asking the question. It is important for the arranger to know what brass players prefer, if given the choice, the arranger could make the one that is easy on the players. I play the trumpet, and when arranging for trumpets I do try to avoid the low C#, because even if it's manageable, depending on the trumpeters' level, its intonation doesn't often get the attention it should. I am guilty of that as a player myself.
Dec
7
comment Key choice for brass instruments
@jjmusicnotes: this assumes concert key. I am talking about playing key. "Sharp keys are harder to tune" is very much of interest, could you develop this?
Dec
5
comment Key choice for brass instruments
I'm not sure about your "crossing breaks" reasoning. I understand that you mean that playing G to G# jumps from one partial to another, but we're talking keys here. You have either a G or a G#. If it's a G you have such a break to the A (or Ab), if it's a G# you have such a break to the F#.
Dec
5
comment Key choice for brass instruments
As @MattPuman wrote, most of them are still adding sharps. Besides, my question is about preferred keys, a given arrangement might fail to make everybody happy.
Dec
5
comment Key choice for brass instruments
I am on page with that concept, but I am sure my references did mean playing key.
Dec
4
comment Key choice for brass instruments
Keys, yes, corrected. My first reaction was that they meant concert key, but these sources replied that they did mean playing key.
Jun
25
comment What conventions are used with accidentals and tied notes?
Could you expand on the the engraving difference between a tie and a slur? I saw in your example that they don't look the same, but I had never noticed. Very interesting!
Jun
25
comment Why aren't unusual leading tone cadences more common?
I think IV-Imaj7-I is actually a plagal cadence (IV-I), only that you put the maj7 in there for a while.
Jun
24
comment How to know what notes/chords go together while improvising?
"Then change all of the notes, and leave the rhythm the same." I have to test this. Otherwise I hear you about tone choice being less important than most people think, and it's not the first time I hear that. But I just can't seem to make myself believe it (I just love the tension-release effect of playing out for a bar and then land in), so I'll have to test your exercise!
Jun
16
comment What is the difference between swing and shuffle?
As an example, listen to Clifford Brown: youtube.com/watch?v=dnK6OHPQZbA . It swings as HELL, and yet the melody instruments are playing nearly straight 8ths.
Jun
16
comment What is the difference between swing and shuffle?
I actually practice scales this way now: 8th notes, straight, p on the beats, mf on the other 8th. I also slur the notes in pairs, starting on the mf 8th. In other words, grouping with both volume and articulation the 8th number 2 with 3, 4 with 5, and so on. It's a bit mechanical, but if you're new to this articulation it helps moving from your old ways.
Jun
16
comment What is the difference between swing and shuffle?
+1 At last! I'm not a fan of the "swing = triplet feeling" explanations. It makes musicians sound like... people who just read what swing is on the internet. I'm a bit skeptical about the 50's, my experience is that the tighter swing feeling kind of started to disappear in the 40's with bebop. In the 30's they still played with tight triplet feeling, but this hasn't been hip for very long now.
Jun
15
comment “Tritone” intervals in n-tone equal temperament
Semantically, "tritone" is three whole tones. Would you have a definition of "tone" in a n-temperament scale? Then take three of these. If you are looking for the most dissonent (it's arguable if the tritone is the most dissonant interval in 12-temperament. There is a tritone in a dominant 7 chord), then find the "weidest" frequency ratio.