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May
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answered Truth behind Mozart memorizing Miserere and then writing it down later in full
Mar
4
answered Preparing for my first jazz gig
Jan
5
comment Can blues be upbeat and cheerful?
In a "feel" approach to classifying songs, would you consider Gary Moore's "Still Got the Blues" a blues song? youtube.com/watch?v=4O_YMLDvvnw (It's songs like this that triggered my somewhat hostile comment above)
Jan
5
comment Can blues be upbeat and cheerful?
The I-IV-V chord progression would definitely be a major element, even though in a song like "C Jam Blues", that progression may only exist in the listener's head. youtube.com/watch?v=gOlpcJhNyDI 12 vs 16 vs 8 bars would be secondary criterium.
Jan
5
comment Can blues be upbeat and cheerful?
I would argue that your two examples can still be classified as Blues/Not Blues using formal criteria, just that these criteria are a bit more complex than "12 bar form"
Jan
5
comment Can blues be upbeat and cheerful?
Regarding your two examples, "Need your love so bad" is still recognizably a blues song, just a sixteen bar form instead of 12 (which is not all that uncommon). "It feels like I'm in love" has a twelve bar form, but is lacking the I-IV-V chord progression.
Jan
5
comment Can blues be upbeat and cheerful?
I tried in vain to find a phrasing that would talk about the people who have stripped "blues" of any plausible meaning (e.g. Bono: youtu.be/-9NaIYULk6s?t=1m15s), without painting you with the same brush.
Jan
5
answered Can blues be upbeat and cheerful?
Jan
5
comment Can blues be upbeat and cheerful?
Do you have a source to cite for "blues is a comment on the feel of a piece of music, rather than necessarily its structure"? In Jazz, I hear "12 bar blues progression" very commonly used to describe the structure of a song, while when I hear "blues" used to describe the overall feeling of a piece, it's mostly by listeners who lack the analytical tools to give a more nuanced description.
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Apr
7
comment German in Bach's Cantatas
I compared the recitative in the St Matthew’s passion to the 1545 text of the Luther bible, and it is indeed nearly word for word identical, so I can’t dispute that it must be Frühneuhochdeutsch. Still, it is highly intelligible. Maybe that is due to the fact of the biblical language remaining in continuous use in liturgical contexts, while contemporary secular texts fell out of fashion and thus seem less familiar today.
Apr
6
comment German in Bach's Cantatas
Being a native speaker, I’d say that the language is very easily intelligible for contemporary speakers, but also clearly recognizable as dated. I would consider it more comprehensible and more modern than e.g. the text of Simplicius Simplicissimus which was published around 1670, so I find it hard to agree with your classification of it as Frühneuhochdeutsch (which was supposed to end around 1650).
Apr
4
comment Chord analysis: b13 or #5
@Tim in my (limited) understanding, the difference between a 4 and an 11 is not what octave the note is played in relative to the root, but the context implication, i.e. that a 4 is usually a sus4, with the 3 omitted, while the 11 is not.
Apr
4
comment Chord analysis: b13 or #5
@Tim let me ask you the converse question to explain my view: Do you think that a pianist, when encountering e.g. a C13, is obliged to hit a particular set of keys spanning more than one octave, but a bit less than two? That’s not exactly how it works.
Apr
4
comment Chord analysis: b13 or #5
@jjmusicnotes ah, thanks for the explanation, but I don’t think that’s how chord extensions work. What octave a note is played in is a matter of voicing and has nothing to do with the chord identity.
Apr
3
comment Chord analysis: b13 or #5
Could you explain what you mean by "too soon in the rising note list" ?