151 reputation
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bio website derylgallant.ca
location Charlottetown, Canada
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Dec 23 '13 at 19:05

Musicy Techy Me: I'm a bassist and Developer From PEI - have kids - a wife - a house - I wear many hats - I'm interested in things - things which are cool


Jan
11
comment When decreasing string gauge on a bass guitar, will I need to adjust the truss rod?
Another proof... I recently purchased a used jazz bass. It was not taken care of at all - tuned up a 4th.. neck very warped. But it was cheap. Took it home... did my best with it and gave it some life. But then I took it to my luthier and he whipped that thing back into shape and now it's actually my #1 bass it plays so beautifully.
Jan
11
comment When decreasing string gauge on a bass guitar, will I need to adjust the truss rod?
Sorry for the long delay. It varies. But the guy I use is $60 for a standard setup + supplies ( Strings, wiring, etc ). Money well spent.
Feb
29
comment Learning Guitar by hearing
and re: the black magic thing... again it's part of the experience journey. If you play on an acoustic guitar G, C, D chords enough you get to almost "remember" the sound/color/timbre of those chords... then if you hear a song that has some of those chords that you've come to recognize you can pick them out.. I'm not saying you'll be able to pick out any chord in any tune like some sort of robot :P If you have perfect pitch, yes, ... if you're like the rest of us again it just takes time and practice. If you want to learn legit .. learn solfège .. a tool that sticks with you forever
Feb
29
comment Learning Guitar by hearing
it's a journey... I'm going to use bass as an example .. let's take a simple G chord that has three notes repeated in any order ( G, B, D ) ... and the bass player is playing a G note.... you're trying to find the right note that is being played...so you start playing random notes and you land on a D note.. to an untrained ear it might sound absolutely correct ( because it is part of the chord ) .. but as you get more experienced and your ear grows in its ability you'll be able to quickly hear that you're playing the "wrong" note.
Jan
17
comment When I do a pulloff on strings 2-5, how do I prevent my finger from muting other strings?
When you say you are pulling paralell to the fretboard do you mean you are pulling "down" towards the edge of the fretboard or "up" and away from the fretboard?
Jan
3
comment How to handle a newly purchased score book that won't stay opened?
I just did this at Staples . $5 ... and it's perfect
Dec
21
answered When decreasing string gauge on a bass guitar, will I need to adjust the truss rod?
Dec
8
awarded  Supporter
Dec
8
comment F# major vs Gb major?
agreed .. I do think that there is little weight in your statement he didn't want to be confusing by using a true parallel minor I do however think you've hit the nail on the head with this statement "Also consider what it would have meant if he had done a true parallel minor key change .... Gb minor has 9 flats (b and e are double-flat). That would've been a bit ridiculous for sure." Usually the simplest explanation is correct. Key of F# minor is much easier to read than Gb minor... his orchestra would have complained way too much :)
Dec
8
comment Learning Guitar by hearing
My feeling on relative pitch is that it's learned ( unless you're born with perfect pitch ) .... There was a time that I listened to Guns n' Roses "Don't Cry" so much that I could always hear the "G A" ( in GnR downtuning of course .. so F# G# ) in my head...and 9 times out of ten if I sang it in my head and then grabbed my guitar and played it I was right. Very cool. Also, I had a bass student that on his first lesson after playing for a short while could not hear the difference between up/down/high/low..... and now years later he's teaching an ear-training course at a local college. cool
Dec
7
answered Learning Guitar by hearing
Jul
22
comment How to start bass-guitar plucking?
There is no official method...the most common is the 1st, 2nd finder combo. But there are people that use mostly one finger ( James Jamerson ) or people who use all 4 ( Alain Caron ) ... using the thumb is not very typical for all styles of music but it can pretty useful along with a palm mute for a very deadened "thump, thump, thump" sound.
Jun
7
awarded  Teacher
Jun
7
answered How to start bass-guitar plucking?