4,292 reputation
824
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Apr 2 at 16:26

Dec
30
comment How does string gauge affect a guitar's sound and playability?
Good answer. I would mention that the gauge of acoustic strings also affects volume as well as sustain; heavier-gauge strings "drive" the top of an acoustic guitar with more force, and also provide a different "resting" tension. A particular acoustic guitar will sound best with a specific gauge set of strings; too light and the guitar sounds thin, too much and the guitar sounds stuffy.
Nov
6
comment How to make songs with chords that don't belong in a scale?
Actually it's A-C#-E-G if you follow the key of A (it's a sharp key, not flat). I'll edit.
Nov
5
comment How important is it to have an EQ pedal in your chain?
This is one of the reasons why I like giving the house engy a pre-EQ DI feed. My amp allows pre/post EQ switching on its built-in DI; for those who aren't so lucky, just slip one in between your pedal board (every bassist should have at least a good chorus and a gain boost) and your amp input. Now, turn your cab towards yourself and kick it back at an angle; presto, instant monitor feed, with the sound you want, independent of what the engy wants for the house mix. Like you, I've come to the realization that I have very little control over the house mix, but I can still control my stage sound.
Nov
5
comment Beginner replacing guitar strings
I would also suggest light strings over mediums for an acoustic. Even the lightest light acoustic strings are the equivalent of an electric guitar's medium-heavy, and that high tension can present that much steeper a learning curve to a beginner.
Nov
5
comment Beginner replacing guitar strings
I typically prefer to have an entire backup instrument for those times when a string decides its had enough. Rather than having to take five right then, I can switch to my backup instrument, even if it's not ideal for a particular song, then replace the string at the end of the set (ALWAYS have at least one set of strings in your case, as well as plenty of picks, and if your axe has active electronics, a spare battery).
Nov
4
comment Why do musicians prefer to play in certain keys?
Possible duplicate: music.stackexchange.com/questions/3486/…
Nov
4
comment How to make songs with chords that don't belong in a scale?
As for using any of the 12 tones on top of the 5th chord, that starts getting very jazzy and barbershoppy, but yes, when you're on the V chord, the natural progression from there is back to I, so if you want to redefine what the I chord is, you can add a tone, pick a triad out of the chord, and resolve that to your new tonic. It doesn't have to result in a permanent key change; you can use this to slide down through chords barbershop-style.
Nov
4
comment How to make songs with chords that don't belong in a scale?
I mention this in my answer; the IV-7 isn't often heard, but with some small moves it can give you a progression into a key change a half-step higher.
Nov
4
comment How to make songs with chords that don't belong in a scale?
Not all of them. The dominant seventh, for instance, is not in the key when you add it to the tonic or IV chord. I also didn't mention 6th chords, or major-seventh chords, or half/fully-diminished chords, which get more and more dissonant and use fewer and fewer in-key notes depending on what scale tone you're building them on.
Sep
16
comment Why do unofficial Stratocaster clones have a differently shaped headstock?
It's actually not a "court" decision, per se; it's a decision of the US Patent Office's Trademark Trial and Appeal board. Just as binding, though. Notice in the opposition docket numbers that pretty much every guitar maker in the United States, from ESP to Warmoth, filed in opposition to Fender's motion.
Aug
16
comment What determines a chord's name?
Umm, Bbb is A. The only reason to differentiate the two is that any key with a Gb would also have an Ab and so A is not part of the key (but a diminished 7th is never in the key of the diminished triad in the traditional modal scales)
Jan
31
comment How can I easily manage different tunings?
The drumming equivalent is if I rearranged your kit, maybe to raise or lower the floor tom, change the angles of toms, or even more drastically, mirror your normal setup. You could play on it, to a point, but it would throw you, especially if you were playing something that tested your technical ability.
Jan
31
comment How can I easily manage different tunings?
@percusse - Guitar playing is all based on patterns, and those patterns are typically drilled into a player's head. The problem, though, is that the patterns that produce the desired notes changes when the tuning does. That's the problem Dr Mayhem is experiencing; he gets used to one set of patterns, then moves to a different tuning and those same patterns produce different results.
Jan
31
comment Electronic drums in apartment
... which I reject; a stick on a rubber pad, on a suspension connected to a frame that rests on the ground on rubber feet, will transfer approximately as much vibration to adjoining rooms as if I were slamming my fist into my other hand while standing in the same spot. That is to say, none. The greater concern, IMO, is an action like pedals (kick/hat), where stepping on them will generate a shock on something resting very directly on the floor, and may also result in incidental impact of his foot with the floor.
Jan
31
comment Electronic drums in apartment
I live in a two-story house that's 90% hard floors. Whether I hear her moving around upstairs in her office/sewing room depends on how heavy her footsteps are and the shoes she's wearing; hard heels, or coming down the stairs with a basket of clothes, yes. Sneakers or bare feet, not so much.
Jan
31
comment Electronic drums in apartment
... which, like the actual noise of an electric guitar, is minimal.
Jan
17
comment What are the dos and don'ts of positioning your thumb on a guitar?
Not to disagree, because what you describe is good technique, but many chords are most easily formed using the thumb to dampen or even fret the low E; for instance, the open D major chord and its D/F# variant. It's simply natural to bring the thumb around in the "baseball bat grip" to form these chords.
Jan
17
comment How do you mic a guitar amp?
... but be careful with the mic capsule; most of the mic is very durable billeted aluminum/steel, but the free-floating capsule enclosure can't take as much as, say, a 58's grille. It's why I prefer the Audix i5 for snare, just because the grille-enclosed design can handle a few whacks from an overzealous drummer. Guitar cabs, you don't have that problem
Jan
10
comment What should I look for in a recording microphone for personal use?
As far as mikes that are well-respected in the industry, you really can't go wrong with a Shure SM58 for dynamic, or an AKG C1000S for condenser; these are well-known industry workhorses. For general instrumental work, you may also consider a small-diaphragm compact cardioid condenser, aka a "cigar mike" like the Rode NT5; they go places a lot of other mikes can't, and you can point them at almost anything and get a good sound.
Jan
10
comment What should I look for in a recording microphone for personal use?
Generally speaking, dynamics are going to be less expensive than condensers of a particular "tier" of build and sound quality. There's a spectrum to both, but a premium to be paid for a condenser. When you spend more on either type of mic, you get a flatter frequency response, better sensitivity for the given class of mic, more options such as multi-pattern designs or multiple options for external power on condensers, better durability/build quality, and/or a brand name (Neumann makes really good mikes, and everyone knows that, including Neumann).