3,959 reputation
626
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location Arizona
age 60
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
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Long time developer in lots of different fields on different hardware using different languages for different reasons.

Greatly enjoying Ruby, Sequel, Nokogiri, Rails, Sinatra/Padrino, and trying to find time and opportunities to work with Python.

I have years and years of experience with Perl too, along with Java, SQL, Pascal, C, various assembly languages and interpreted BASICs.


1d
comment How much does an electric guitar's body physics affect the tone, playability, etc?
It's also worth noting that, as a musician for over 30 years, and having had numerous different electric guitars, including multiple examples of Les Pauls, Stratocasters and 335s, all identically configured, and having picked them from many others on the walls as I was auditioning them, that individual instruments do have their own sound, in spite of attempts by the manufacturers to maintain consistent quality and tone of the instrument. Wood varies, and until we get rid of the wood we will see the response of the instrument change because of it.
1d
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
Tone knobs don't affect the sound, except in making it easier to turn the pot. What is important is the capacitance and tone circuitry.
2d
comment How much does an electric guitar's body physics affect the tone, playability, etc?
I would contend that a maple-capped Les Paul vs. one without the maple would have a similar sound, however, a Les Paul made entirely of maple would not sound similar to one made of all mahogany. The woods are very different in their density resulting in a large difference in the brightness of the guitar's sound.
2d
comment How much does an electric guitar's body physics affect the tone, playability, etc?
Comparing those three models and saying wood is the only difference completely ignores the construction differences of an ES model vs. a solid-body along with body weight.
Nov
19
comment Why do tube-based guitar amplifiers sound so good?
I've been working with several blues-harp players who learned directly from Junior Wells. Junior was well known for deliberately overdriving his amplifier to get a distorted sound. He didn't care for sustain, since a harp relies on the player's breath control for that. He wanted distortion for that sound. Little Walter also did the same thing.
Nov
7
comment Really light electric guitar strings and the blues
I'm not sure "responsive" is the word you're looking for. Perhaps "flexible" is a better term to describe a light string's tendency to bend easily when fretted.
Jul
2
comment How to learn guitar without physical lessons?
+1. Re: transcribing: The guitar isn't like a woodwind instrument in that it has multiple places on the neck to play the same pitches, with each position having a different timbre. Learning to hear those differences takes a while but is important when trying to figure out chord changes and solos.
Jul
2
comment Major Blues Scale over I-IV-V progression
I think you're overthinking it. "Playing the blues" isn't about mechanically adhering to certain notes, it's inserting those notes into your phrases to catch the ear of the listener. Play an F if you want, since it's in the key, and use F#/Gb and G. Playing blues throws a wrench into classic theory, just as jazz does. Knowing when and why you want to do that is the trick.
Jul
2
comment Major Blues Scale over I-IV-V progression
"Many players will even play with notes that sound quite wrong for the sake of tension." Yes, and sometimes we play notes that are quite wrong because, well, they were quite wrong, but we recover by working our way back into the key through deviousness and pretending "I meant to do that." :-)
Jul
2
comment Major Blues Scale over I-IV-V progression
+1 A "blues scale" isn't really a scale, because it's missing notes, and the notes it has can be accidentals. Worrying about whether the notes are correct for the key misses the point entirely for playing blues; It's all about expressing something we hear, and we pick and chose notes in and out of the key to provide the tension/bluesy feel.
Jul
1
comment What determines how hard it is to press a guitar string?
Action is only a part of it. Try tuning bass strings to guitar pitch, then try fretting them. Even though they could be close to the neck, their tension would make it really hard to press them down. Action improving with age? Action shouldn't change at all, especially on an old guitar, as changing is a bad sign that the guitar is unstable and needs inspection.
Jul
1
comment What determines how hard it is to press a guitar string?
"The straightness of the neck has nothing to do with the tension.", yes, but it can have a lot to do with how hard it is to press a guitar string. If it's pulling forward the action will be higher, increasing the difficulty of fretting. If it's bowing backwards, the action can be improved, improving the fretting. That's basically why we adjust the relief of the neck.
Jun
3
comment How do I know when it's time to change a tube on my amplifier?
I remember those, and used them on my old '65 Deluxe amps' tubes. (And no, I don't have them any more because I stupidly sold those. Too.) It'd be a great service to their customers if the mega-music store chains had tube testers next to their stock of replacement tubes. I'm sure they can find old testers for dirt-cheap. Slap on a coat of paint and a cute wrap and plug them in.
Mar
5
comment Pickups and selector switch stop buzzing when touched?
Taylor calls it a "shunt", so I used their terminology. The strings are not grounded when the fuse/shunt blows, instead the connection to the strings is broken entirely, and, if you're holding the strings, you won't get shocked as the circuit to the strings, and hence the player, no longer exists. I've got two Taylors with them in it; One currently is blown and the guitar works fine, albeit with a bit more noise which goes away if I touch the pickup casing to ground myself.
Mar
5
comment Pickups and selector switch stop buzzing when touched?
There are very valid reasons why guitars should not have their strings (or tuners, bridges or other metallic parts) grounded. It creates a situation where the guitarist can close a loop through badly wired A/C circuits, which can cause a shock, or even death. It's better to shield the controls and possibly do what Taylor does in their electrics, and use a shunt that'll open in case of a ground-loop. Modern building codes should having wiring that won't case a problem, but old buildings, or badly wired stages, can be dangerous.
Mar
5
comment How does bodybuilding or weightlifting affect singer's voice?
"How does bodybuilding or weightlifting affect singer's voice?" Are you singing while doing those things?
Jan
24
comment How does the Buzz Feiten tuning system work?
The Martin's back and the BFTS has helped a lot; Getting the guitar tuned is more finicky, probably because I'm having to tune differently, but it sounds great once I get it there. Chords and open-chords are in tune past the twelfth fret now. It was a totally reversible change to an original guitar that had a badly placed bridge right from the factory. Awesome!
Dec
31
comment How does the Buzz Feiten tuning system work?
As I understand it, Feiten is the nut, the saddle and how the frets are crowned. My '69 Martin D35 is in the shop for one, to correct issues from the factory back then and my tech went over the changes he'd have to make. Because it's such an old guitar he's trying to avoid any unreversible changes.
Dec
27
comment How well does mental practice work for you on different instruments?
It paid off for Prof. Harold Hill in "The Music Man". :-)
Dec
24
comment In jazz, can anyone play any song?
Copyright violation is a costly experience. It's good for all artists to be aware of the laws, both to protect themselves and avoid accidentally (or deliberately) violating them. The laws aren't identical around the world, but the ideas are the same.