2,485 reputation
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location Cologne, Germany
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visits member for 3 years
seen 21 hours ago

Functional programming enthusiast, audio engineer & musician. Whilst not busy with any of that, I study physics at Universität zu Köln / Bonn-Cologne Graduate School.


Aug
7
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
While it's true that the guitar cable has a (horrendously) strong influence on the sound, this has surprisingly little to do with the actual quality of the cable. A cheap cable will typically have a bad shielding and thus bless you with lots of hum and other noise, but that doesn't really affect what you hear from the guitar; OTOH the one parameter that's crucial for the guitar sound – the capacitance – varies throughout cables of all price classes. Anyway, +1, since it contributes indeed very strongly to the tone.
Aug
7
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
Well, the Fender instrument serieses, particularly the bass models, are indeed very similar mechanically. Strat vs. Tele also isn't all too different, but still notably – the Tele twang comes from the body, and probably wouldn't really work with a vibrato system. The very low-inductance pickups further emphasise it, but you could probably hear it through Strat PUs as well, so no Strat sound. I haven't tried that, though. What I know is, for instance, that it's almost impossible to get a proper sweet jazzy sound with a bolt-on neck solid-body guitar.
Aug
7
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
What exactly do you mean – which types of guitars have which acoustic properties (from the body), which types of pickups emphasise which frequencies, or...?
Aug
7
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
Right, now I quite agree on your ranking, though of course it can really be only a very rough comparison.
Aug
6
revised What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
added 12 characters in body
Aug
6
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
@CarlWitthoft: yes, but then you also won't hear anything of the strings, the pickups, the tone knobs, or the playing details.
Aug
6
answered What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
Aug
6
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
I strongly disagree with your low placement of the mechanical items. Yes, some people get wonderful tones with weirdly-shaped instruments – but just because some unusual shapes happen to be acoustically much more similar to the standard shapes than you'd think from the look. OTOH, if you equip a strat with the exact pickups of a Les Paul, same amp configuration, it won't sing like one. If you put steel strings and single coils on a classical guitar, it'll be completely unusable as an electric guitar and certainly not sound anything Fender-like.
Jul
25
revised How can I make my hammond chord organ sound like a keyboard or piano?
Corrected spelling, improved grammar
Jul
23
comment How can I make my hammond chord organ sound like a keyboard or piano?
While the Leslie cabinet makes up quite a big part of the "classic" Hammond sound, it's still just one part of it. You will still recognize a Hammond without a rotary cab (e.g. Brian Auger doesn't use one). In fact, "Laurens Hammond in particular was not impressed with Leslie's attempt to better his own organ design"! Similarly, you can microphone a grand piano and send the signal through a Leslie cabinet, it will still be a piano sound. — I think you might be confusing it with the tonewheels.
Jul
22
answered How can I make my hammond chord organ sound like a keyboard or piano?
Jul
18
comment Drumsticks: Nylon Tip vs Wooden Tip
"Good sounding" being, of course, subjective. Many drummers prefer the sound of wood on cymbals as well.
Jul
18
comment Oasis - Supersonic Harmonic analysis (What modes are played, explaining modulations and pivots function as roman analysis)
Pity... I though this song was about chords consisting of supersonic pitches, that would have made for an interesting question...
Jul
18
answered Barre chords kill my thumb!
Jul
16
awarded  Yearling
Jun
18
comment Why transpose at the octave?
Right, though this convention isn't all that widely adapted. Guitar is often written without an 8 below the violin clef, bass (be it electric– or double bass) almost always without the 8 below the bass clef, etc..
May
26
comment Ambidextrous instruments
"the left hand fingers do most of the work" just isn't right. The two hands do completely different kinds of work, but you can't really say which is more important, or more difficult. Nor is it actually correct to assert that a right-handed person is in every regard more skilled with their right hand; rather, there will be many things they can do better with the right hand – but possibly also a few where the left hand is better. I am left-handed, yet I can do a lot of things better with my right hand, the fretting of strings being amongst them – but not bowing or plucking.
May
9
comment How to play chords on full fingerboard without looking?
The two answers as of now have very much focused on position changes, but actually it seems your question is rather about voicing chords while already at the right hand position?
May
1
comment What is the reason for pitch inflation?
Good point to be made, but not an answer.
May
1
comment Learning instrument recognition
As for viola vs. violin, that's easy...