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Oct
9
comment How to record a piano with high quality?
Indeed all Shure mics are pretty sturdy, but don't think their recording-suitable condenser models can be called "nearly indestructible". Dynamic mics for recording piano? Not so great. — PZMs are great for many stuff, incuding piano live, but for recording I would hesitate to put them directly in the piano – it does make for a rather uneven response and a strange room sensation. Speaking of room... "piano a mono sound source"?? Beg to disagree. A couple of even cheap condenser mics in a well-setup stereo configuration will give much "greater" sound than anything you can do in mono.
Oct
8
comment What guitar effects pedals are important to get according to genre?
Fuzz is nowadays perhaps more common on bass than on guitar (unlike distortion/overdrive, it doesn't alter the frequency response very much, so works well in frequency domains unintended for).
Oct
8
comment What guitar effects pedals are important to get according to genre?
"...benefit from compression that you don't get from fuzz is sustain..." – actually you do get a bit of sustain from fuzz. Most distortion/overdrive etc. actually compress the signal quite a lot, in addition to the more obvious effect of adding of harmonic/intermodulation overtones (that's what compressors don't do, at least not a lot).
Oct
6
comment Are octaves, fifths, fourths and thirds considered as “consonant” in all music cultures?
Hang on... 12-edo was actually developed in Europe by Bach's time, that bit was wrong.
Oct
6
comment Are octaves, fifths, fourths and thirds considered as “consonant” in all music cultures?
Bach was not an advocate of equal temperament (12-edo), that wasn't even developed in Europe yet. He was an advocate of well-tempered tuning, which though it allows playing in all keys doesn't treat them all the same. WT has some fifths much more notably flat than in 12-edo, whose fifths are actually extremely close to Pythagorean; but in the "white keys" WT has sweeter major thirds, more narrow than the somewhat agressive ones 12-edo gives you.
Oct
4
comment What is balanced audio all about?
About "balanced systems allow for longer cable runs because they lessen the effect of signal loss": For the signal loss it doesn't matter in itself whether the connection is balanced. The reason the statement nevertheless holds in most practical applications is 1. balanced connections are generally low-impedance, while you'll often find high-impedance in unbalanced connections 2. balanced connections don't need a tight screen as urgently as unbalanced ones, so the cables can easier be made with low capacitance.
Oct
2
comment How to play faster songs on the violin?
Well, I hope people won't take your "cheating advice" all too literally and apply it in inappropriate places... but yeah, I'd confirm most of what you say; in the orchestra there are other rules for what'll sound good than when you're playing alone.
Oct
2
comment Getting the right sound from a left-hand percussive when playing slap bass
Note that a really bright sound comes usually from hammering-on a string that was very shortly before excited by a right-hand slap. A lot of the energy of the new tone is actually "inherited" from the old one. Getting a lone left-hand hammer loud is much more difficult.
Oct
1
comment Does a diminished first exist?
@11684: The harmonic minor scale actually has an augmented second – but classical harmony isn't really bound to scales anyway. Diminished-seventh chords appear quite openly in Baroque, seldom but prominent, and it very much does matter that you don't enharmonically confuse them so there's only accidentals of one kind. To give one example, look at bar 59 of the Cello Suite IV prélude: D A F♯ E♭ stacked.
Oct
1
comment Does a diminished first exist?
@11684: that's not true, diminished seventh chords are used at least since Baroque. If the chord cannot exist in classical theory, it's because of the augmented third, though I'm pretty sure that actually features in one or another romantic work as well.
Oct
1
comment What is the correct way to play/mute strings with the thumb?
The A is part of D-major, but that doesn't mean you can just play any A tones as you please – imagine a bass player letting just ring the empty strings, it would sound horrible. The F♯ bass of the chord in question already has a tendency to make it sound a bit muddy, so less other notes in the range is rather better.
Oct
1
comment Does a diminished first exist?
In this case MuseScore and PianoTeq (normally I prefer Lilypond and real instruments).
Oct
1
comment Does a diminished first exist?
@AndrásHummer: with a quarter-tone resolution, you can actually make sense of the precise chord the OP asked about. Check out my answer!
Oct
1
revised Does a diminished first exist?
added 843 characters in body
Oct
1
answered Does a diminished first exist?
Sep
29
comment Why do notes have multiple names?
On the hazard of not surprising anyone: I would refute the premise of this question. Notes don't have multiple names (...except do-re-mi vs C-D-E...). Rather, there are different notes which happen to come out at the same frequency if you render them in certain tuning systems.
Sep
28
revised Pros & cons of in-ear monitors (IEM)
added 1056 characters in body
Sep
28
answered Pros & cons of in-ear monitors (IEM)
Sep
28
comment Is True Bypass better than Buffered Bypass? Is it possible to be neither?
Also, note that a couple of pedals take a good deal of their characteristic sound from the unusual interaction with the guitar: they have a low-impedance input, which largely kills the pickup resonance and takes away a good deal of treble. This won't happen if the pedal comes after a buffered one. (You might argue colouration-by-impedance is horrible design, but then guitar circuits in themselves are horrible design... if I were to decide, I'd mandate guitar manufacturers to make all instruments active.)
Sep
28
comment Is True Bypass better than Buffered Bypass? Is it possible to be neither?
Good answer. Your point about putting a buffered pedal early in the chain should perhaps be phrased a bit differently: "driving all the pedals" is not really an issue, you always drive only the first one that's not in true-bypass mode. Unlike a guitar cable, a pedal in true-BP shouldn't even change the capacitive load (though some no doubt do, despite the name). Perhaps the most relevant concern is not to drive the cable going from the pedal-board to the amp, so what I should say is put a buffered pedal ᴀɴʏᴡʜᴇʀᴇ in your chain.