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Apr
7
answered A (440 Hz) and A (880 Hz) are completely different sounds to me. Does this mean I'm tone deaf?
Apr
6
reviewed Approve Chord name does not match the notes it's written above
Apr
4
comment How to learn to play bass guitar from chord sheets as a rhythm guitarist?
Agreed. Just, it shouldn't be necessary to use a whole lot of different techniques. In fact, many bassists who practise lots of different techniques can't do any of them really well, and as a result they either play only stuff where the various sound changes can barely distract from the basic thematic idealessness, or they play far too much stuff that does more harm than benefit, musically.
Apr
4
comment How to learn to play bass guitar from chord sheets as a rhythm guitarist?
“not really a well-rounded bassist until you've mastered a number of right-hand styles” –perhaps, though many great bassist actually specialise completely in just one of these styles and won't normally use anything else.
Apr
4
comment Is it possible that a music piece written in a “flat key signature” contains sharp-accidentals (and vice versa)?
Possible duplicate of Can a scale contain both a sharp and a flat note?
Apr
4
comment What note values cannot be represented in conventional notation?
@topomorto too bad you don't have an infinite amount of time to practise...
Apr
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
3
revised Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
Qualified uplifting character of raising accidentals a bit
Apr
3
comment Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
@Tim: it may be G to the clarinet player herself, but for all purposes of general musical discussion (beyond individual instrument voices), it would clearly be considered F.
Apr
2
revised Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
Seperate oboe&clarinet from trumpet&trombone
Apr
2
comment Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
@ScottWallace: interesting. I've never played oboe myself. I recall that I used to think it plays easier in sharp keys, but then an oboist told me he prefers flats. Hm...
Apr
2
comment Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
No, I just find the Truck Gear Modulation a horribly overused pop song cliché.
Apr
2
comment Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
No, modulating from E to F tends to cause my head to crash into the wall. Not uplifting... Seriously, I think it would be more appropriate to label this E♯ then, but it doesn't really matter because such a modulation just violates all diatonicity anyway.
Apr
2
comment Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
There's not much perfect about 12-edo tuning, in fact I call it an effective but dirty compromise. Not only vocals, but also most string and wind instruments will naturally deviate from it towards just intonation; in principle that works the same way for all keys, so like with 12-edo you don't have any “particular sound of a key”. Though at least with string instruments, some keys may have empty strings which can't be freely intonated (but some styles avoid empty strings altogether anyway).
Apr
2
revised accidentals wiki description
Add the correct symbols and explain a bit more in depth
Apr
2
answered Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
Apr
2
revised accidentals wiki excerpt
Add the correct symbols and explain a bit more in depth
Apr
2
suggested approved edit on accidentals tag wiki
Apr
2
suggested approved edit on accidentals tag wiki excerpt
Apr
1
comment What is this extension on the scroll of a double bass?
I know this indeed simply by the name C-extension.