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Mar
1
revised Different modes of pentatonic scale
Spacing doesn't work unless you use a formatted block, and using DE as a name for ♭E is unusual at best.
Feb
27
comment Why is my bass making a buzzing noise?
Are you sure you need a second bass for different tunings? If it's just tuned some semitones up or down, this shouldn't be necessary – unlike guitar, almost everything is easiest played in standard-fourths tuning, just transpose accordingly. – If by “different tuning” you actually mean, a different chamber-tone reference (or up/down a quarter-note), this is of course a different matter; but for such microtonal changes it should be fine to just slightly re-tune the four strings of a single bas.
Feb
25
comment How to tune a guitar/bass without a tuner?
There is in fact nothing humourous about this answer, nor is it purely theoretical (though as I said it's nowhere precise enough to be actually useful on guitar). Beat-counting is a very real thing, it has always been used by piano tuners (though probably not for finding the chamber tone itself...), and if you applied the above recipe to organ/synthesizer you would indeed get the precise difference frequency as calculated. Also, the notes would be long enough so you can time it with arbitrary precision, making this method pretty feasible indeed.
Feb
25
answered How to tune a guitar/bass without a tuner?
Feb
24
revised How to tune a guitar/bass without a tuner?
added 383 characters in body
Feb
24
answered How to tune a guitar/bass without a tuner?
Feb
20
comment Tablature vs. standard music notation? (guitar)
I agree with your unequivocal preference for standard notation, but it's really not just to categorise guitarists who don't bother to learn reading notes as inferior musicians. It's perfectly valid, musically, to not accept any such detailed playing instructions at all (though of course they are necessary in many styles), and only stick to general harmonic conventions instead, improvising all the details.
Feb
20
comment Tablature vs. standard music notation? (guitar)
@topomorto: tab notation deals with non-12-edo music awkwardly and arguably causes more confusion about music in general than stdard-not., which doesn't say anything explicit about the tuning system and string spacings (and doesn't claim to). — I would strongly argue that tonality (be it diatonic or pentatonic; standard notation can do both well) is a far more useful and general concept than equal temperament.
Feb
18
comment What is B II, followed by a dashed line, and what does it mean?
See also music.stackexchange.com/questions/14634/…
Feb
6
revised What does this note - B# - mean?
added 323 characters in body
Feb
4
revised What does this note - B# - mean?
added 2 characters in body
Feb
4
answered What does this note - B# - mean?
Jan
19
comment In a song in G major the sound F appears and sounds good. Is there a name for such a phenomenon?
Well, as Gauthier's anwer pointed out, in this song it's probably not a seventh note, but a borrowed chord. — Even in the case of songs like Misty Mountain Hop or Blues in general, I would argue the note is not a dominant seventh: the meaning of dominant is that it resolves to the tonic. If that doesn't happen it can't be a dominant, but actually functions as a harmonic seventh (though in 12-edo tuning, the G is rather a bit too high for that role within an A chord).
Jan
19
answered What does a goniometer (sound) show?
Jan
18
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
@atoth: sure, but such instrument resonances should never influence your intonation!
Jan
18
accepted Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
Jan
18
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
Allthough... I once played with a metal band, and the bass drum literally made my bow bounce on the strings, so strongly was it picked up by the cello body. But then, I was sitting right next to the drummer and it was an estimated 30 dB louder than a string ensemble could ever get, so...
Jan
18
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
Resonance between different instruments or even voices? Seems unlikely to me, do you have any references on this? For empty strings on a single instrument this can of course have a great effect (Sitar etc.), but I can't see this working for e.g. a string ensemble (where each string is much stronger affected by the bow than by the vibrations from other instruments; after all those need to be picked up again by the body and then sent to the strings through the bridge).
Jan
18
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
Amplitude, at any rate, is rather useless as an indicator for loudness. (Otherwise, there would be no point in compressing/limiting record masters.) If anything, you need to talk about amplitudes of some single frequency, but I also don't think that's helpful – after all, white noise sounds louder than any sine wave of the same ampliture, though it's Fourier transform is lower at every single frequency. (Do correct me if I'm thinking wrong here!) That's why I discussed power (i.e. RMS), but as I said the argument can't really be true in that sense, since energy is conserved.
Jan
18
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
@jjmusicnotes: I don't know; as I said I just heard this claim "it makes you louder", and I'd like to know in which sense of "loud" this is true or whether it's simply bogus.