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Jan
2
comment What is “groove”?
Classical music can have lots of groove. Granted, there is a bit of a tendency to the stiff side, but that's not necessarily the mark of good classical performances. There definitely are lots of tempo variations and microtiming in classical music, much more than in popular music!
Jan
2
awarded  Custodian
Jan
2
reviewed Reviewed Are there any great open questions in music theory/psychoacoustics?
Jan
2
answered Is two singing voices occasionaly being unison “allowed”?
Jan
2
comment Better way of playing major Barre chords
@Tim: it depends on the context which of the two 5ths is more important. But if you don't need the high one, you'd better not bother with that awkward A-shape in the first place, but use e.g. a normal index-finger barre over those three strings. An index-barre does fortunately not prevent a proper open hand, because you can roll around the finger (pronation). — The 3rd only clashes with the root and 5th if you render it in 12-edo. In just intonation, everything is a powerchord.
Jan
1
comment Are there any specific criteria for notating guitar sheet music particular to the guitar?
No, guitar has no such limitations. Chords with more than 8 notes are completely fine, no problem at all...
Dec
30
answered Better way of playing major Barre chords
Dec
22
comment How can I extend the pitch range of the ribbon on a Monotron?
The problem if you try to make it too simple: the monotron's analogue oscillator is highly non-linear and also depends a lot on temperature. So with a mechanical octave switch, most of the time the tuning reference will not be right, you'd need an additional fine-tuner. — If you'd like to avoid hardware hacking, your best bet is likely to play the monotron though a standard guitar pitch shifter / whammy pedal, using that as a range selector.
Dec
21
comment What music notation software allows you to code the notation?
I don't think any of these can really take it up with Lilypond though (which, incidentally, started out as a LaTeX package too, but became standalone when it was determined that music typesetting diverges from standard document typesetting in too many ways for this to be a really practical approach).
Dec
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
4
awarded  Talkative
Dec
3
answered My guitar plays out of tune on the high e on fretted notes up the neck
Dec
3
comment The notes outside the major scale form a pentatonic scale
(Though I would add that the circe of fifths isn't the only way how notes can be harmonically near: major thirds are so harmonious because they are a single 5-limit step, not because you can get them as 4 fifths. Indeed Pythagorean thirds sound pretty jarring, even when you're used to the already too-big 12-edo thirds!)
Dec
3
comment The notes outside the major scale form a pentatonic scale
Well, no, B♭ and A♯ are just not the same note with different names, but two different notes which happen to be so close that some instruments can get away with approximating them both as the same frequency. Just because they're close however doesn't mean they're similar, and your answer actually explains quite well the reason.
Dec
3
comment The notes outside the major scale form a pentatonic scale
B♭ is not part of the F♯ major pentatonic.
Dec
2
revised The notes outside the major scale form a pentatonic scale
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Dec
2
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Dec
2
revised The notes outside the major scale form a pentatonic scale
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Dec
2
answered The notes outside the major scale form a pentatonic scale
Nov
28
comment Why does the chord progression Gmaj - F#maj - Amaj sound the way it does?
@Dom: well, Pythagoreically speaking, the ii degree is basically defined as the secondary dominant. Only if you stay in a single diatonic scale, the ii chord is rendered as minor and thus doesn't function as V/V, but using the secondary dominant and labelling it II is fine and common.