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Apr
28
comment Controlling high frequency of heavily distorted guitar tone (metal)
There can't really be a scientific approach to this, because ultimately it's always subjective what's “good” or “bad”. Anyway, let me repeat my earlier point: cabinet IR and post-EQ are not the single crucial factors for a good sound, though they will typically make the most obvious difference. If you can't seem to find an IR that sounds quite right, then probably there is something subtle wrong earlier in the signal chain.
Apr
26
awarded  Custodian
Apr
26
reviewed No Action Needed Music Harmonic analysis: Chord identification
Apr
26
comment Is there a more precise way to play F natural on a D pennywhistle?
On the recorder (which has an extra hole for the C) you get the F♮ by covering all holes except the third. Analogously I'd suspect on the tin whistle you can get something F-like by covering all except the second hole, but I haven't one to test how usable this is. You may need to partially cover the second hole anyway to get the tone low enough.
Apr
24
comment What is the difference between sharp note & flat note?
And it's not generally true that A♯ is higher than B♭. You're probably referring to a leading tone A♯ that's “gravitating” towards its B resolution. But apart from such leading notes, just-intonation actually tends to make sharps lower, compared to 12-edo tuning (because a sharp-note is more likely to be the third of a major chord).
Apr
24
comment Are there any plain nylon bass strings for classical guitar?
BTW, solid-polymer strings can actually be used for bass, even below the guitar range and without excessive scale: bass ukulele is normally strung with thick rubber strings! Of course, these give a pretty weird sound, but you can play music with them...
Apr
24
comment Are there any plain nylon bass strings for classical guitar?
@Blahman: the Thomastik Classic S have sort-of flatwound bass strings. (Mind, these aren't really nylon strings – they have a very thin stranded steel core, which helps to counter the dullness associated with flatwound.)
Apr
23
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
14
comment Is there a name for the technique where a singer uses the falsetto register on releasing a note?
In German, I'd call it umkippen (“tip over”) or kieksen (onomatopoeic). The closest fit in English might be just the voice cracks, but that seems rather more severe...
Apr
10
answered guitar buzz or humming (grounding problem)
Apr
5
comment Can one tell by ear whether a bowed instrument is being played up or down?
@CarlWitthoft: except for the lefties. Of course there are very few that actually play left-handed; I'm one of them and my colleagues tend to be quite relieved when I play some passages with inverted bowing!
Apr
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
31
comment Improvising on the piano as a solo instrument: what octave range to cover?
Well, this obviously depends totally on what sound you want, there aren't any fixed rules. IMHO, many piano players would do well to keep their hands a bit closer together – certainly in band playing as you say, but also when e.g. only accompanying a singer.
Mar
29
revised How to obtain a Clean yet Distorted guitar sound?
added 485 characters in body
Mar
29
answered How to obtain a Clean yet Distorted guitar sound?
Mar
24
comment How to play a G-chord?
Worth to note that, classically speaking, the four-string variant isn't “correct” as a G chord – it is really G/D. Often doesn't matter, certainly not when only strumming chords while an actual bass plays the G below (in fact the sound can get muddy when then the guitar also adds a low G and B), but for solo fingerstyle you'll generally want to add the G on the E-string.
Mar
24
comment Are there any resources to self-learn the bass guitar for those who already know theory?
There was this guy. He once met a bass teacher, who convinced him to give it a try. So he did. First lesson, they played the E a bit. Dum dum dum dum... Week later, now let's try that on the A string. Dam dam dam... Next week. Tell you what, we can switch between those notes! Dam dum dam dam dum... Next week, student didn't appear. Months later they met again by chance on the street. Teacher asked, where have you been? Didn't you want to learn the bass? Ah sorry, no time for that. Got too many gigs...
Mar
20
comment How can I reproduce the choppy synth in “Come on Home” by Franz Ferdinand?
Definitely a possibility; at any rate the sound blends in very well with all the guitars on the album – though, there are quite a few definitive keyboards on that track. You don't have a reference that it was done this way in the original?
Mar
19
comment John Bonham's bass drum technique
Heel-down is certainly not only a jazz thing, I've also heard from metal drummers how they consider it “tighter”.
Mar
18
comment Scale length with incorrect bridge position
I'd love to say something more about this, but frankly I haven't finished anything else yet in 17-edt tuning. There's a lot of handwritten ideas, some sketches about how the theory would work out, but nothing really definitive. I've occasionally just tried improvising something on the guitar, but to little avail. Trouble is, you basically need to purge everything you know about western music from your mind: because the chromatic steps in 17-edt are so similar to 12-edo, you easily end up playing detuned diatonic melodies instead of scales that make harmonic sense in the odd 7 (or 11) -limit.