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location Cologne, Germany
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visits member for 3 years
seen 59 mins ago

Functional programming enthusiast, audio engineer & musician. Whilst not busy with any of that, I study physics at Universität zu Köln / Bonn-Cologne Graduate School.


Jun
18
comment Which audio file to use for benchmarking?
@Dave: exactly. Because there's so little sound in that recording, nothing to mask any artifacts the compression algorithm might produce. (Actually I do hear some gentle reverb in the record, but hardly enough to be much use for masking.)
Jun
18
comment Which audio file to use for benchmarking?
I'm quite sure parameters such as power consumption will not be measurably different even in a comparison of chamber music with dubstep. Just use any file you happen to have lying around, that's not a problem license-wise and perhaps which you like yourself.
Jun
18
comment Which audio file to use for benchmarking?
If anything, this could be a question for either sound-design or DSP – but at the moment, it's far too vague for both. You'll need to properly describe what you're trying to benchmark: an audio compression codec? Some speakers? An audio file by itself can't have good or bad "performance".
Jun
17
comment What use is knowing how many sharps or flats a key signature has?
Sure you need to know which sharps if you want to play. OTOH, if you just want to know the key quickly by looking at some sheet music, counting is faster and quite sufficient.
Jun
17
comment What characteristics of a single-coil (Telecaster) sound to consider for simulation?
Nice analysis! — "Unlike a nylon string"? I was always under the impression that nylon strings had stronger inharmonicity, have you measured otherwise? (Of course, on a nylon string the higher harmonics decay faster, so it might just be less noticable.)
Jun
17
comment Can I use bass pick as guitar pick?
Brian May would use a sixpence, not a dollar of course!
Jun
10
comment What is the origin of the up bow and down bow symbols for bowed string instruments?
That's what I always though as well, but I don't have any sources either.
Jun
9
revised In Pythagorean tuning, what's the frequency of the tonic of each key?
added 1372 characters in body
Jun
8
comment What is causing this weird distortion coming from my amp?
You're probably just not giving it enough peak level from the computer, that's why you don't hear distortion (modern mastered tracks, due to RMS optimisation, sound much louder at the same levels than a raw guitar signal). At any rate the keyboard is distorted in much the same way as the guitar, so this definitely is about the amp.
Jun
8
comment What are the significant schools of 20th century music theory?
For a moment I was getting really excited, thinking this theory had something to do with Riemannian manifolds. Pity, it's another Riemann guy.
Jun
8
comment What is causing this weird distortion coming from my amp?
Sorry to say, but I'm afraid there's no problem as such here – it's just not a very good amp. Actually, most guitar amps have a substantial amount of distortion even in "clean" mode and at low levels if you measure it, only, in a good tube amp this comes over more as a pleasant kind of soft-compression. In a bad transistor amp, it comes over as a nasty rasp, that's just the way it is.
Jun
8
revised What is causing this weird distortion coming from my amp?
Embedded SoundCloud.
Jun
8
answered In Pythagorean tuning, what's the frequency of the tonic of each key?
Jun
8
comment In Pythagorean tuning, what's the frequency of the tonic of each key?
While this correctly explains how you can find an arbitrary root note in Pythagorean tuning, it doesn't answer whether it would be a good idea to do that. Indeed I would argue it isn't a good idea.
Jun
7
comment Can flat notes be played on a chromatic harmonica?
@Tim: as "the original Blues instruments" I'd consider the human voice, which is not tuned in any temperament (most definitely not 12-edo), along with Blues harp (diatonic), Diddley bow (untuned), and slide guitar. Sure enough adaptions for piano and banjo / spanish-style guitar would quickly appear, but that's just approximations. "An instrument that plays G# out of tune to another's Ab is impractical" – no it isn't, e.g. flutes and clarinets certainly do that (though the player may trim manually). And let's not start with string instruments.
Jun
4
comment What is a “Chord of Nature”?
"above-5 harmonics are hard to discern" doesn't hold much truth as such. It's very easy to discern, say, the 8th from 9th harmonic, that's an ordinary whole-tone step (just/Pythagorean)! And harmonics higher than the 5th sure are very audible in most instrument sounds. What you're referring to is 5-limit, which means all intervals which are employed musically can be interpreted as compounds of the first 5 harmonics' relations. But that's largely a matter of what's easily implemented as an instrument tuning and what you're used to hear.
Jun
1
comment Appropriate temperament for violin
@BobRodes: actually, there is a third (plus two octaves) between the viola's C-string and the violin's E. The outer strings of each instrument make up a twelfth. That already does make for a notable difference between Pythagorean tuning (what you get from tuning all neighbouring strings in perfect fifths) and just or 12-edo tuning. — But apart from that: I was under the impression that the OP indeed asked about fingered notes. It is most certainly possible to differentiate between equal temperament and just intonation here, and good players will in fact do that (even if not consciously).
May
31
awarded  Nice Answer
May
26
comment Why isn't D the “most central” note?
The symmetry of Dorian mode is also present in Pythagorean tuning (which goes very naturally with Wicky-Hayden), rather older than 12-edo!
May
26
comment Appropriate temperament for violin
Your answer is quite right, but that's not what the OP is asking for. Tuning the open strings in 12-edo is certainly fine because 12-edo fifths are extremely close to perfect (3:2) fifths. This question is about whether you should tune the fingered notes in 12-edo or just intonation. — @Codeswitcher: western fiddle music is generally played in a hard-to-define "dynamic intonation", where each note is tuned individually as the player sees fit. That's a big part of the expressiveness in these styles. Indeed the pitches will normally be closer to 12-edo or Pythagorean than just intonation.