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Jun
13
answered Cello A5 possible?
Jun
13
comment Stucturing Rock Band Practices
Flat hierarchies can also lead to amazing creativity, if the chemistry is right.
Jun
11
comment changing pickups of an electric guitar
@rlo yeah, but then a $5 investment of a simple preamp with 1 nF capacitive load would also do the trick.
Jun
11
comment changing pickups of an electric guitar
“Gone from country to rock” aha. So that's evidently exactly what I was talking about: you switched to pickups with higher inductance, as a result you get a less twangy, more powerful sound, and it'll sound decent even if that Tele does not really have a good Tele response. But heck, why don't you start with a rock guitar right away if you don't want a Tele sound?
Jun
11
comment changing pickups of an electric guitar
@rlo no, it's bizarre how people worship the simple difference between pieces of wire wrapped around some magnets, rather than recognising the much more subtle details of guitar building. I have changed pickups before, and in particular I have changed guitar circuits (which can pretty much generate any pickup-sound from any different pickup, only by clever capacitive&resistive loading). OTOH What is not possible is to simulate a particular guitar response by changing the pickups: the sound will be different, perhaps it will even be good, but it will (most likely) not be a strat sound.
Jun
11
revised changing pickups of an electric guitar
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Jun
11
answered changing pickups of an electric guitar
Jun
10
answered Compare FM synthesis sound signal to equivalent additive synthesis signal
Jun
10
comment How to help students remember Half vs. Whole rests
Pity this only works in English, it's really an excellent mnemonic.
Jun
9
answered How to practice chord changes into B major?
Jun
4
awarded  Nice Answer
May
25
comment Why does software-synthesized MIDI music sound so bad?
(And FWIW, I don't think the final soundtrack of Pirates of the Carribean is entirely synthesized (though Zimmer apparently rendered a full-synth preview); at least some of the less bombastic passages are played on real instruments.)
May
25
comment Why does software-synthesized MIDI music sound so bad?
“MIDI is not sound.” – indeed, and that's really the whole answer to the question. — I don't quite agree with how you contrast free/bad synths with good ones – truth is, some of the more expensive ones make it more feasible to achieve results close to a human performance on a real instrument; but ultimately the quality depends a lot on how well the arranger knows the particular synth. Professional synth-only productions are usually not just MIDI, at least not in the traditional GM sense: there's a lot of dynamic tweaking of all the parameters required.
May
21
comment Why do old russian guitar songs sound out of tune?
It's worth noting, in this context, that 12-edo tuning was actually invented in China, long before western music started to take it up! Arguably, the tuning is better suited for many far-eastern styles (which tend to be mostly 3-limit), than for western classical music (whose 5-limit thirds are not represented so well by 12-edo). Of course, this doesn't mean far-eastern influences (which may include excessive pitch bends, and some styles probably also have higher limits like in Indian music) are not a factor which might make Russian music sound off to western ears in the age of autotune.
May
11
comment Effects with audio interface
Should be noted that some newer amps (Including Behringer models such as the LX110-GY; I suspect the OP might have one like that) don't actually rely on the colouring by the power stage and cabinet much, but simulate all the colourations digitally and in the end send the signal to a power stage and speaker that in itself behaves much more HiFi than traditional guitar amps. In this case, the line-out will probably sound as good as the amp gets.
May
9
comment Why won't my new guitar play in tune?
Sounds like a nut issue, either too high or misplaced. How high are the strings over, say, the 3rd fret?
May
9
comment Can someone clarify the range of orchestral strings?
@CarlWitthoft: yeah, that's also possible. I've always interpreteted it that the fingers act like a bottleneck slide up there (the high frequency means you need very little inert mass to stop the string). But IMO these notes sound rather harried; artificial harmonics tend to come out smoother.
May
8
comment Can someone clarify the range of orchestral strings?
@alephzero: well, violinists and violists could probably reach over the body too, but they couldn't establish a stable thumb position there as on the cello and bass – and without that, intonation is just a bit too much of a roulette. — As for special techniques, sure you mean below the bridge? That's normally a bow-only thing, there's not really much interesting the left hand could do there. What is occasionally done is, playing (flageolett) notes higher than the fingerboard reaches, but still above the bridge.
May
8
comment Can someone clarify the range of orchestral strings?
@NeilMeyer: I consider that a needlessly complicated perspective. Guitar and double bass aren't transposing instruments, they simply use a different clef, which happens to be an octave lower than treble / bass clef, respectively. In guitar scores, this is generally written as such (with an 8 below the clef); for double bass it somehow hasn't caught on.
May
8
revised Can someone clarify the range of orchestral strings?
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