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visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 21 hours ago

Functional programming enthusiast, audio engineer & musician. Whilst not busy with any of that, I study physics at Universität zu Köln / Bonn-Cologne Graduate School.


Aug
21
comment Relationship between 3/4 and 4/4
Also, a hemiola switches between 6/8 and 3/4 (or two bars of 3/4 and 3/2, or possibly 10/8 and 5/4 etc.) but it doesn't make sense for power-of-two meters.
Aug
18
answered Quality of Sound Box changing with time?
Aug
13
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
As for active pickups, you're missing the point. A cable, even with really high capacitance, does not by itself roll of any high end. This phenomenon only comes about in connection with a resistor (the cable itself has a resistance, so, technically it does swallow treble... but you need many miles of cable for this to become an issue) or inductance. It so happens that a passive electric guitar has a massive inductance in its signal path, namely the pickup itself; it is this combination of solenoid inductance and cable-capacitor that creates both the pickup's resonance and treble cutoff.
Aug
13
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
@Kaz: didn't see you'd commented on my remarks. — Alas, you're wrong here. When we properly design a guitar circuit nowadays, we put a capacitor in, yes. But this wasn't done back in the days, those are not properly designed circuits but (usually) more or less random collections of parts that the luthiers found sufficiently nice in the end-result (with cable, amp etc.). Capacitance in such a guitar cable is needed; when you connect a pickup with just two short wires to a preamp it'll sound rather thin and characterless, the resonance will be so high it doesn't really come out in the amp.
Aug
12
comment Is an inversion a different chord, or a different voicing?
@RolandBouman: no, I'm arguing the fourth doesn't sound dissonant, it merely offers an environment where the composer might put other notes that are dissonant (and because that's often done in classical counterpoint, this may be heard even if no such voices are actually present – anyway two notes a fourth apart, without any context, don't sound dissonant). That's like saying a white light amidst plenty of purple isn't green, it merely looks green because the environment suggests that (not really, but you know what I'm getting at).
Aug
12
comment Is an inversion a different chord, or a different voicing?
Really, what people mean when describing the fourth as dissonant is that it "induces" a dissonant second between the upper note and an implied (or actually played) fifth above the lower note. But this is only relevant when the lower note is really rendered as a proper bass. — OTOH, the first inversion stands out much more obviously even in a guitar strumming: the third is higher up in the harmonic series, so the ear can't as easily add a virtual extra bass to reinstate the I root. Which is of course also the reason why the third should not be doubled in classical 4-voice counterpoint.
Aug
12
comment Is an inversion a different chord, or a different voicing?
While all you say is accepted as rules within classical counterpoint, it doesn't hold much truth for accompaniments with a less pronounced voice layout, like a strummed guitar. Many guitarist will actually default to the second inversion when playing chords like C, D, dm and G, even as a final chord and when there's no extra bass instrument present. This sounds quite fine, because they don't particularly accentuate the lowest note it merely adds some extra "depth" to the sound, without distracting from the root. The fourth is not a dissonant interval, though this is often said.
Aug
11
comment How do I play the synthesizer on my own?
@Dave: but you wouldn't be able to play anything over that bass loop, since the Mininova is monotimbral.
Aug
10
comment Carved fingerboard between frets on a guitar
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalloped_fretboard#Scalloping
Aug
7
comment Are the highest pitches always the easiest to hear in a musical texture?
Laptop switching power supplies tend to be much more audible than I'm happy with... not acoustically, but electrically, interfering with instruments plugged into an audio interface without galvanically separated ground.
Aug
5
comment Peavey XXX amp - weak / overly loud clean channel
@atoth: well, you have plenty of headroom in the master section, so I don't think it should be a problem to get the Rhythm channel loud enough when used only slightly crunchy.
Aug
5
revised Peavey XXX amp - weak / overly loud clean channel
added 12 characters in body
Aug
4
answered Peavey XXX amp - weak / overly loud clean channel
Aug
4
comment When is a note b5 and when #11?
IMO, if they write it as d♭ then it must be a d♭ and not c♯, so it can't possibly ♯11. But then again, Jazz guys tend to treat enharmonics in a way I often don't agree with, so...
Aug
4
awarded  Enthusiast
Aug
2
comment What makes an interval “Perfect”?
@supercat: might be a point for purely-sawtooth-synths-music, but with acoustic instruments there's always enough "movement" regardless of intonation. I don't think anybody really has a preference for slightly-sharp thirds as such, they'll either not notice them at all or notice them as dissonant. However 1) that dissonance can have leading character 2) if you tune some of the thirds to just 5/4 but keep the same 12 pitch classes and try to play arbitrary music, you'll invariably have some intervals gotten way more dissonant, which is really the reason why 12-edo has been so successful.
Jul
31
comment Why am I always sticking to minor keys?
@ethc: in a major key, you'll typically have a fat bass note whose 5th harmonic matches directly with the third you're trying to play... but can't. In a minor key, the detuning is more subtle; the third doesn't have a very clear relation to the fundamental at all here (the 15th harmonic isn't usually audible very clearly), and the fifth to which it might have a stronger relation normally isn't played as loudly as the fundamental. So the discrepancy from just intonation is better "hidden" in a minor chord than it is in a major chord.
Jul
26
comment Is the particular skill of singing the melody correctly necessary to be able to play the trumpet?
Having a good musical hearing does not imply that you can sing melodies correctly (though it does imply that you notice it yourself when you're off).
Jul
24
comment How does phantom power work?
This kind of question would really be better off on electronics or Sound Design. Anyway I don't think you're actually talking about phantom power: as you see on Wiki or Kevin's answer, that's mostly used to power microphones but definitely not sufficient for stage monitors. Also, phantom power almost always uses XLR connectors, not 1/4".
Jul
23
comment Can Imaj7(#5) resolve to I?
@RolandBouman: you certainly can't just ignore any non-chord tone, least so if it's in the bass. But pedal points are a special case, they aren't really considered part of the harmony at all but rather "reminder of what tonic we eventually want to end up in". Then, there's not actually an f in G♭9, but if set so clearly as a dominant the seventh would be somewhat implied. As for the G itself, that's not in fact present in the diminished-seventh chord – since the bass has a pedal point the fifth-movement is out as a resolving effect anyway, so it's mainly the third b that resolves to the tonic.