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location Cologne, Germany
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Functional programming enthusiast, audio engineer & musician. Whilst not busy with any of that, I study physics at Universität zu Köln / Bonn-Cologne Graduate School.


Apr
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
28
revised Why is music for strings more likely to be in keys with sharps?
added 4 characters in body
Apr
28
comment Why is music for strings more likely to be in keys with sharps?
FWIW, it's a bit misleading to put the minor keys together with their parallel, rather than relative, major variants.
Apr
28
answered Why is music for strings more likely to be in keys with sharps?
Apr
28
comment What's this weird sound coming from my speakers?
It tends to be much worse with electric-guitar equipment, which is notoriously susceptible to any interference because of its (technically questionable, but you know, vintage) high-impedance design.
Apr
22
comment Why are there many guitarists, but only one drummer in a band?
True, but lots of drummers have two or more drum kits in their garage anyway (at least one acoustic, one electronic). And drummers generally aren't as fussy about using somebody else's instruments as guitarists are, so It wouldn't be too much of a problem for another drummer to come over.
Apr
21
comment Synth sounds that make good solo instruments but don't mimic pianos, organs etc?
Also, IMO most decent bass synth patches actually make for good lead melody lines when played in high registers, and vice versa – it's just a bit different. What doesn't work well of course is replacing mono lead/bass sounds with pads, which again is an issue of dynamics and attack character (as well as possibly portamento etc.) rather than pitch range.
Apr
21
comment Synth sounds that make good solo instruments but don't mimic pianos, organs etc?
That's really a naïve argument. Synths can use any kind of keytrack curve for any parameter you like, so it's much easier to build a synth patch that will sound good in every octave than to build an acoustic instrument with a large range. And even if you don't account for this at all – a synth sound that's uniform everywhere can be used very well for playing homophonic organ-like accompaniments. Only, that'll become boring rather quickly. The main problem is that you have a hard time getting any part of what you play to stick out, short of the dynamic response a piano offers.
Apr
16
comment How does a metronome help me play music better?
OTOH, if a group of musicians has trained really a lot "syncing" their respective clocks, everyone will be in time with everyone else but not to any fixed tempo, which sounds amazingly better than anything you can achieve with practising to metronome (let alone, recording songs to a click track!) And good musicians will also find their way to others' tempo quite easily in a jam session. — That notwithstanding, many not-so-great musicians have timing that would indeed benefit a lot from metronome practise...
Apr
12
answered Synth sounds that make good solo instruments but don't mimic pianos, organs etc?
Apr
9
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
4
comment Why are guitars strung low-to-high?
At least for double bass and cello, there are also bowing reasons for the string order: on the low strings, you need most power and rigid arm control close to the frog, while the high strings actually benefit if the bow hand is held higher, more "open" and lightly movable. Moreover, thumb positions are much easier to play this way. For violin and viola I don't know much about what the consequences would be of inverting the string order.
Apr
3
comment What is the difference between the classical and contemporary method of teaching instruments?
I don't think you should say "it makes each performance of a particular piece very similar". It's rather that the classical approach gives freedom in other, more subtle aspects of music than the contemporary approach, e.g. you'll generally consider a much wider spectrum of dynamic and tempo changes, vibrato varieties, and there are even multiple ways to intonate individual notes. Of course, in both schools there are teachers who'll tell their students there's only one "correct" way (basically like a MIDI computer program would play it), but that is just wrong IMO.
Apr
1
comment Evidence of Just Intonation in Recordings with Non-fixed-frequency Instruments
I just came across this paper, which does an analysis of deviations from 12-edo in violin performance – but only in a solo melody context, so it's hardly just intonation.
Mar
31
comment C#m in Am chord progression
The 4-semitone explanation seems rather strange to me, and particularly unlikely seeing as this comes from someone with as profound classical backing as Yngwie Malmsteen. But anyway, it's sure an interpretation you can choose for yourself. Only... what the heck does this have to do with Blues-style I IV and I V changes?
Mar
29
comment Controlling high frequency of heavily distorted guitar tone (metal)
Good mixing tips indeed, but how does any of this adress the problem in the question? "With distorted guitars: First get the sound right..." correct. Well, why don't you give advice on that point? That's what's needed here.
Mar
29
answered Controlling high frequency of heavily distorted guitar tone (metal)
Mar
24
revised Should the dominant-seventh chord in just intonation use 9:5 for its seventh, or rather 16:9?
added 1642 characters in body
Mar
24
comment Should the dominant-seventh chord in just intonation use 9:5 for its seventh, or rather 16:9?
It's rather that I'm wondering which sort of correction it is that players will normally seek to use when playing the V7's minor seventh. I suppose most won't think much about it. The thing is, unlike with the third (where Pythagorean 81:64 is really not nice, but 5:4 is extremely smooth – so it's obvious what to do) the options 9:5 and 16:9 sound really similar on their own so it's hard to analyse what's going on, but the full chord comes out really different.
Mar
23
comment Should the dominant-seventh chord in just intonation use 9:5 for its seventh, or rather 16:9?
@PatMuchmore: Sure I am talking about an adaptive situation that tunes differently depending on harmony. It's not something unusual; at least singers, string instrument players, probably double-reed players and trombonists do this all the time, don't they? It's inherent to just-intonation practise.