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location Cologne, Germany
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Functional programming enthusiast, audio engineer & musician. Whilst not busy with any of that, I study physics at Universität zu Köln / Bonn-Cologne Graduate School.


Oct
20
revised What instruments are inexpensive, portable and not too loud?
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Oct
20
comment How to have a penetrating voice?
The human ear tends to perceive midrange frequencies as louder than bass frequencies, but also louder than treble frequencies (above 3 kHz, the response drops again). Which is why something white-noise-ish wouldn't really be efficient, that's rather what you get on many pop records (for a present, "close", literally breathing, yet soft sound). A "piercing" sound OTOH needs most of all strong formants, which are in the midrange. Sure you need good breathing technique, but only as an indirect tool.
Oct
11
comment Making alternate picking palm muting sound like downpicked palm muting
Most of the difference I can make out is, I think, simply because your all-down picking isn't quite in time; you seem to need a bit more endurance training on those repeated down strokes. If there are any subtler tonal differences then they're drowned by that uber distorted sound (let me guess: a Digitech Metal-nonsense pedal?); possibly there would be more to hear in a cleaner sample.
Oct
10
comment Why is the ''backbeat'' called the ''rock beat''?
It's not quite right anyway. In the rock beat, the snare accents are on 2 and 4, and the snare drum happens to be the (at least perceptively) loudest instrument in the band. The other instruments usually don't emphasise 2 and 4 particularly.
Oct
9
comment Why does my thumb hurt when I play bar chords?
Classical grip, if done right, is perfectly suitable for full-on barre chords. In particular, there is almost no pressure on the thumb because the force comes directly from the arm (the biceps) – though that, of course, only works properly when playing seated with a footrest.
Oct
9
comment Restringing a 12-string guitar with heavier strings - is it possible?
What would be really intersting is to get the base-strings down by a fifth, but keep the extra/octave strings at their original tuning...
Oct
5
comment “Dull” sound when recording dry audio from an Ibanez S series, not caused by old strings?
Note that "smile curve" is a quite simplified description on what goes on in a guitar amp. If you implement such a curve through a generic EQ, you're likely to end up with a muddy, interference-laden sound without much power in the mix. For a proper tube-amp sound, you always need to consider the complex nonlinear distortion effects as well, and the response of the cabinet itself. Effectively, this often boosts the midrange and cuts away even more highs; but the result still won't sound dull because of the nonlinear excitation effects etc..
Oct
5
comment Is there a difference between 2/4 and 4/4
@user2588: seen this xkcd?
Sep
17
comment How to algorithmically find a chord progression for an infinite arbitrary melody?
Ignore the code here, it's still mangled by html-tag "detection". The one on GitHub is right. — Great, Euterpea! Will you upload what you're doing there? I think I might fancy trying it myself otherwise... — As for minor parallels – I could explain briefly about those, but I don't think it would be very effective. Look at the code, and/or read a book on basic music theory. Wikipedia also has quite a bit on this.
Sep
15
revised How to algorithmically find a chord progression for an infinite arbitrary melody?
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Sep
15
revised How to algorithmically find a chord progression for an infinite arbitrary melody?
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Sep
15
revised How to algorithmically find a chord progression for an infinite arbitrary melody?
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Sep
15
revised How to algorithmically find a chord progression for an infinite arbitrary melody?
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Sep
15
answered How to algorithmically find a chord progression for an infinite arbitrary melody?
Sep
2
comment How to make the bass in beatboxing
@AsianSquirrel: voiced bilabial stop is just the phonological term for what most people would normally call "the b sound". But I think what the quoted text instructs is actually a voiceless bilabial stop, i.e. "p sound".
Aug
22
comment How to make the bass in beatboxing
I don't think the writer really wants to ask for a voiced bilabial stop. The reason they're writing b rather than p is that the latter tends to be spoken "harder", with more lips tension, which is clearly not what you want here. I suppose most people don't know that the phonetically correct distinction is voiced vs. voiceless, rather than loose vs. tight.
Aug
20
comment How to get a good distortion sound on Guitar Rig
It is possible to produce sounds digitally that match a good analogue setup. But you can't do it in quite the same way, and that's where NI etc. get it completely wrong by packing their plugins with replicas of seperate analogue pedals / amps. The right way is to study the interplay of filtering (begins at the guitar pickups, dependent on the first FX – very important to consider but completely neglected by many!), distortion and convolution effects. Of all plugins I know, iZotope Trash gives the best control over all of this, but you really need to understand the physics to use it right.
Aug
20
comment What's the difference between a Flanger and a Phaser?
Good approach on touching the physics of both effects. But you've missed an important point: in the delay-based flanger, the periodical variation causes a substantial Doppler shift, so the flanger will "smear out" the frequency spectrum in addition to notching it. This doesn't happen much at all with the phasers, and that's what I would call the main difference. In a chorus, which is basically a special type of flanger, the focus is almost exclusively on the smearing, while the notches are mostly unwanted byproduct.
Aug
8
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
Guitars do have their own caps. The tone-pot caps have a much higher capacitance than any cable, but they're normally partly seperated from the PUs by the pot. And the pickups and other circuit in the guitar, like the cord, have an internal "accidental" capacitance. A (passive) DI box has an inductive load, that can indeed have quite an effect. — Active pickups are, IMO, the consequent cure for all this unpredictability mess. They have a "cable simulation" capacitance, usually built-in, and seperate all external factors by means of a buffer amplifier.
Aug
8
comment What factors contribute most to the tone of an electric guitar?
You can't say "such or such capacitance is good, or bad". It is not really post-guitar, because what the capacitance does is it affect the pickups' resonance. Now, in some guitar/pickup combinations that frequency may be rather too high by itself; then a cable with big capacitance might make the sound warm/pleasant. If the resonance is already too low, then the same cable will make it undefined/muddy, while a low-capacitance one might bring out unexpected brilliance. See "what causes the difference in cord quality between brands" on AVP.