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Apr
23
comment Is playing fingerstyle really hard?
You certainly shouldn't be scared about fingerstyle, it's not that hard. If you're motivated to learn it, you will probably manage to do so.
Apr
23
comment How do I notate a 'wailing' sound?
Great answer, though I wonder whence you procure that “general rule” of slurs automatically implying legato if possible on the instrument. As you say yourself, this is not the case for bowed string instruments, nor on woodwinds (which are more limited in portamento range, but e.g. oboe could certainly implement many half-tone slurs as portamenti), nor on guitar or keyboards with pitch-bending capability. In fact, trombone and timpani seem about the only instruments where slurs are commonly understood as portamenti! So, I'd definitely put the oblique-line notation as first recommendation.
Apr
11
comment Stretching for a guitar intro
This is right and good to know, but both of these options are probably not optimal in terms of sound and groove. It's certainly a good skill, being able to play that typical Rock'nRoll pattern as the OP has it in the tab; I thing that version is best in particular for playing with a lot of overdrive.
Apr
11
comment How to grok 20th-century pop music as evolution of classical harmony
Exactly. You first need to rebase pop on top of classical, to make history look linear. Wait...
Apr
8
comment How can I hear what a mathematical function sounds like?
The OP didn't include any physical units. It could as well be f₁ = (0.5 min⁻¹) / 2π ≈ 0.0013 Hz, which is even further into the subsonic. Or, more sensibly, it could be understood as referring to an arbitrary time scale, i.e. the base frequency is ad libitum.
Apr
8
comment A (440 Hz) and A (880 Hz) are completely different sounds to me. Does this mean I'm tone deaf?
@Yakk: I wasn't going for imperfections of 12-edo tuning at all here. (The fifths on a well-tuned piano are only ever so slightly off, they can be considered as perfect in basically any musical context – it's the thirds that you need to worry about.) What I meant was, in a perfect fifth (7 semitones), the tones have a clear harmonic relationship, which means the lower note is clearly the root and the higher note is, well, the fifth. But in a tritone (6 semitones), none of the notes has anything like “root character”, i.e. the two notes are more on an “equal footing” than those in a fifth..
Apr
7
comment A (440 Hz) and A (880 Hz) are completely different sounds to me. Does this mean I'm tone deaf?
@Yakk: curiously enough, one might even say that the two notes a tritone apart are more similar than the two notes a fifth apart: in the latter, there's a clear hierarchy that the lower one has root character and the fifth is harmony, whereas the tritone's enharmonic ambiguity thwarts such symmetry breaking.
Apr
4
comment How to learn to play bass guitar from chord sheets as a rhythm guitarist?
Agreed. Just, it shouldn't be necessary to use a whole lot of different techniques. In fact, many bassists who practise lots of different techniques can't do any of them really well, and as a result they either play only stuff where the various sound changes can barely distract from the basic thematic idealessness, or they play far too much stuff that does more harm than benefit, musically.
Apr
4
comment How to learn to play bass guitar from chord sheets as a rhythm guitarist?
“not really a well-rounded bassist until you've mastered a number of right-hand styles” –perhaps, though many great bassist actually specialise completely in just one of these styles and won't normally use anything else.
Apr
4
comment Is it possible that a music piece written in a “flat key signature” contains sharp-accidentals (and vice versa)?
Possible duplicate of Can a scale contain both a sharp and a flat note?
Apr
4
comment What note values cannot be represented in conventional notation?
@topomorto too bad you don't have an infinite amount of time to practise...
Apr
3
comment Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
@Tim: it may be G to the clarinet player herself, but for all purposes of general musical discussion (beyond individual instrument voices), it would clearly be considered F.
Apr
2
comment Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
@ScottWallace: interesting. I've never played oboe myself. I recall that I used to think it plays easier in sharp keys, but then an oboist told me he prefers flats. Hm...
Apr
2
comment Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
No, I just find the Truck Gear Modulation a horribly overused pop song cliché.
Apr
2
comment Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
No, modulating from E to F tends to cause my head to crash into the wall. Not uplifting... Seriously, I think it would be more appropriate to label this E♯ then, but it doesn't really matter because such a modulation just violates all diatonicity anyway.
Apr
2
comment Are sharp keys “bright” and flat keys “dark”?
There's not much perfect about 12-edo tuning, in fact I call it an effective but dirty compromise. Not only vocals, but also most string and wind instruments will naturally deviate from it towards just intonation; in principle that works the same way for all keys, so like with 12-edo you don't have any “particular sound of a key”. Though at least with string instruments, some keys may have empty strings which can't be freely intonated (but some styles avoid empty strings altogether anyway).
Apr
1
comment What is this extension on the scroll of a double bass?
I know this indeed simply by the name C-extension.
Apr
1
comment How can I hear what a mathematical function sounds like?
Well yeah... but the physics units are a bit messed up anyway here; it doesn't really make sense to consider cos(2 ⋅ t) if t is a time.
Mar
29
comment Schoenberg's Hexachord decoded
That doesn't seem to be said hexachord. I think it's actually supposed to be laid out B♭ B C E♭ E G, yielding only SCHBEG. — Anyway... this is so arbitrary (like everything in twelve-tone technique, mind); you could read plenty of other stuff into that hexachord.
Mar
22
comment Why acoustic-guitar often use direct output instead of amp miking while on-stage?
That's actually what I do too: my cello runs through a Para-Acoustic DI. No amp on stage. But I rely completely on in-ear monitoring, if it weren't for that then I would use an acoustic amp. Wedge monitors are unbeatable for vocals; but for acoustic instruments they're at best ok, often much more prone to feedback problems than a good acoustic amp. — Aside... how does this post actually answer the question?