Reputation
4,502
Next tag badge:
78/100 score
15/20 answers
Badges
9 29
Newest
 Custodian
Impact
~192k people reached

Mar
4
comment Does the type of wood on a solid body electric guitar affect its tone or sound?
youtube.com/watch?v=OLxE8iDWD_w
Mar
2
comment Multieffects Pedal to USB Recording Device
My favourite for distortion/amp stuff in particular is iZotope Trash. In general for virtual effects, the plugins included in Reaper are a great starting point, and they're actually gratis!
Mar
2
comment Multieffects Pedal to USB Recording Device
You can do that either by connecting the RP500 via USB and somehow soft-routing it as an FX plugin (not sure if/how it works with that model), or you can plug one of the M-Track's outputs back into the RP500's guitar in and record from its stereo out. The technique is called re-amping, you can look it up for further advice. — However, the main idea behind my suggestion to record the clean guitar signal was to not use the RP500 at all in a way that's audible in the final result. I would instead do all FX, amp-simulation etc. with software plugins in the computer.
Mar
2
comment Are electric guitar types associated with certain music genre?
@Basstickler: I started a CW answer list, for everybody to extend upon.
Mar
2
comment Are electric guitar types associated with certain music genre?
@Basstickler: actually I'd say such an “association list” question is fine, but only as Community Wiki. This kind of stuff is what the feature is there for.
Mar
2
comment How to differentiate between a diminished fifth and an augmented fourth interval?
This gets even more relevant in barbershop harmony, to some degree also in blues and soul: the 7-limit tritone 7:5 is actually a consonance, and sounds very different from its inversion 10:7.
Mar
2
comment Why would expectations of students vary largely between instruments?
When your instrument is the viola, you're pretty restricted anyway, so... — Seriously: it's a fact that almost all instruments have a preference for certain keys. Violin, cello, guitar, probably also oboe, indeed viola, and flute, they all prefer keys with a few sharps. But they are flexible enough to also handle a few more ♯s (though I suppose from B major upwards, you'd also struggle, wouldn't you?) or several ♭s. Now, for the bigger instruments it is probably really more difficult to “squeeze” in such a non-idiomatic key. I've never tried any brass instrument, so I wouldn't judge.
Mar
2
comment Why would expectations of students vary largely between instruments?
I once heard a violist complain his instrument “wasn't supposed to play in F-major”. Turns out the key was actually C – he'd merely misread a grace note for a ♭.
Mar
1
comment Electric guitar effects and amplification
@topomorto: yes, of course simple analogue amps aren't very flexible in their range of overdriven sounds. But the point I was making is basically: too much sound-flexibility is not necessarily helpful for a beginner to have – in fact it tends to distract from the playing itself, and from developing the technique necessary to get a good and versatile/dynamic sound out of the guitar itself, to start with. That's just a personal opinion of mine: all guitarists I really like are able to get a good sound even with the most minimalistic amp setup (or with an acoustic guitar).
Mar
1
comment Electric guitar effects and amplification
Ahem. So you're arguing that any music with electric guitars can not be listened to over a home stereo? — What's correct is: if you apply power stage overdrive to a home stereo amplifier, it would likely not end well for the tweeters, perhaps even overheat the woofers and/or circuitry, and definitely sound horrible. But, you'd probably have to mod the amp circuit to even get there: modern amplifiers, at least professional ones, should have a limiter built-in, precisely because power-amp overload is so disastrous. OTOH, unfiltered preamp distortion sounds not nice, but it's pretty harmless.
Mar
1
comment Electric guitar effects and amplification
If you mean a consumer stereo system (I wouldn't really call that a PA) then it'll probably have only RCA inputs. But, yes, you can still use those, get a twin 1/4" to RCA cable, plug it into the stereo line-out of the FX processor and the AUX in of the stereo system (or whatever it's called).
Mar
1
comment Electric guitar effects and amplification
Use a simple 1/4" instrument cable from the guitar to the FX processor, and then a pair of such cables from the processor to the PA.
Mar
1
comment Electric guitar effects and amplification
@MattL.: right, but then you need to start with a good guitar amp for the “basic sound”.
Mar
1
comment Different modes of pentatonic scale
@mey: Pelog can be considered a microtonal scale, it can not really be played on western instruments at all since the precise intervals don't exist in 12-edo tuning. If you admit microtonality, there are obviously infinitely many pentatonic scales, but this question was apparently asking only about the usual western pentatonics, i.e. the subsets of diatonic scales which don't contain a semitone step.
Feb
27
comment Why is my bass making a buzzing noise?
Are you sure you need a second bass for different tunings? If it's just tuned some semitones up or down, this shouldn't be necessary – unlike guitar, almost everything is easiest played in standard-fourths tuning, just transpose accordingly. – If by “different tuning” you actually mean, a different chamber-tone reference (or up/down a quarter-note), this is of course a different matter; but for such microtonal changes it should be fine to just slightly re-tune the four strings of a single bas.
Feb
25
comment How to tune a guitar/bass without a tuner?
There is in fact nothing humourous about this answer, nor is it purely theoretical (though as I said it's nowhere precise enough to be actually useful on guitar). Beat-counting is a very real thing, it has always been used by piano tuners (though probably not for finding the chamber tone itself...), and if you applied the above recipe to organ/synthesizer you would indeed get the precise difference frequency as calculated. Also, the notes would be long enough so you can time it with arbitrary precision, making this method pretty feasible indeed.
Feb
20
comment Tablature vs. standard music notation? (guitar)
I agree with your unequivocal preference for standard notation, but it's really not just to categorise guitarists who don't bother to learn reading notes as inferior musicians. It's perfectly valid, musically, to not accept any such detailed playing instructions at all (though of course they are necessary in many styles), and only stick to general harmonic conventions instead, improvising all the details.
Feb
20
comment Tablature vs. standard music notation? (guitar)
@topomorto: tab notation deals with non-12-edo music awkwardly and arguably causes more confusion about music in general than stdard-not., which doesn't say anything explicit about the tuning system and string spacings (and doesn't claim to). — I would strongly argue that tonality (be it diatonic or pentatonic; standard notation can do both well) is a far more useful and general concept than equal temperament.
Feb
18
comment What is B II, followed by a dashed line, and what does it mean?
See also music.stackexchange.com/questions/14634/…
Jan
19
comment In a song in G major the sound F appears and sounds good. Is there a name for such a phenomenon?
Well, as Gauthier's anwer pointed out, in this song it's probably not a seventh note, but a borrowed chord. — Even in the case of songs like Misty Mountain Hop or Blues in general, I would argue the note is not a dominant seventh: the meaning of dominant is that it resolves to the tonic. If that doesn't happen it can't be a dominant, but actually functions as a harmonic seventh (though in 12-edo tuning, the G is rather a bit too high for that role within an A chord).