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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
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Functional programming enthusiast, audio engineer & musician. Whilst not busy with any of that, I study physics at Universität zu Köln / Bonn-Cologne Graduate School.


Mar
1
comment Electric guitar effects and amplification
Use a simple 1/4" instrument cable from the guitar to the FX processor, and then a pair of such cables from the processor to the PA.
Mar
1
comment Electric guitar effects and amplification
@MattL.: right, but then you need to start with a good guitar amp for the “basic sound”.
Mar
1
comment Different modes of pentatonic scale
@mey: Pelog can be considered a microtonal scale, it can not really be played on western instruments at all since the precise intervals don't exist in 12-edo tuning. If you admit microtonality, there are obviously infinitely many pentatonic scales, but this question was apparently asking only about the usual western pentatonics, i.e. the subsets of diatonic scales which don't contain a semitone step.
Feb
27
comment Why is my bass making a buzzing noise?
Are you sure you need a second bass for different tunings? If it's just tuned some semitones up or down, this shouldn't be necessary – unlike guitar, almost everything is easiest played in standard-fourths tuning, just transpose accordingly. – If by “different tuning” you actually mean, a different chamber-tone reference (or up/down a quarter-note), this is of course a different matter; but for such microtonal changes it should be fine to just slightly re-tune the four strings of a single bas.
Feb
25
comment How to tune a guitar/bass without a tuner?
There is in fact nothing humourous about this answer, nor is it purely theoretical (though as I said it's nowhere precise enough to be actually useful on guitar). Beat-counting is a very real thing, it has always been used by piano tuners (though probably not for finding the chamber tone itself...), and if you applied the above recipe to organ/synthesizer you would indeed get the precise difference frequency as calculated. Also, the notes would be long enough so you can time it with arbitrary precision, making this method pretty feasible indeed.
Feb
20
comment Tablature vs. standard music notation? (guitar)
I agree with your unequivocal preference for standard notation, but it's really not just to categorise guitarists who don't bother to learn reading notes as inferior musicians. It's perfectly valid, musically, to not accept any such detailed playing instructions at all (though of course they are necessary in many styles), and only stick to general harmonic conventions instead, improvising all the details.
Feb
20
comment Tablature vs. standard music notation? (guitar)
@topomorto: tab notation deals with non-12-edo music awkwardly and arguably causes more confusion about music in general than stdard-not., which doesn't say anything explicit about the tuning system and string spacings (and doesn't claim to). — I would strongly argue that tonality (be it diatonic or pentatonic; standard notation can do both well) is a far more useful and general concept than equal temperament.
Feb
18
comment What is B II, followed by a dashed line, and what does it mean?
See also music.stackexchange.com/questions/14634/…
Jan
19
comment In a song in G major the sound F appears and sounds good. Is there a name for such a phenomenon?
Well, as Gauthier's anwer pointed out, in this song it's probably not a seventh note, but a borrowed chord. — Even in the case of songs like Misty Mountain Hop or Blues in general, I would argue the note is not a dominant seventh: the meaning of dominant is that it resolves to the tonic. If that doesn't happen it can't be a dominant, but actually functions as a harmonic seventh (though in 12-edo tuning, the G is rather a bit too high for that role within an A chord).
Jan
18
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
@atoth: sure, but such instrument resonances should never influence your intonation!
Jan
18
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
Allthough... I once played with a metal band, and the bass drum literally made my bow bounce on the strings, so strongly was it picked up by the cello body. But then, I was sitting right next to the drummer and it was an estimated 30 dB louder than a string ensemble could ever get, so...
Jan
18
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
Resonance between different instruments or even voices? Seems unlikely to me, do you have any references on this? For empty strings on a single instrument this can of course have a great effect (Sitar etc.), but I can't see this working for e.g. a string ensemble (where each string is much stronger affected by the bow than by the vibrations from other instruments; after all those need to be picked up again by the body and then sent to the strings through the bridge).
Jan
18
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
Amplitude, at any rate, is rather useless as an indicator for loudness. (Otherwise, there would be no point in compressing/limiting record masters.) If anything, you need to talk about amplitudes of some single frequency, but I also don't think that's helpful – after all, white noise sounds louder than any sine wave of the same ampliture, though it's Fourier transform is lower at every single frequency. (Do correct me if I'm thinking wrong here!) That's why I discussed power (i.e. RMS), but as I said the argument can't really be true in that sense, since energy is conserved.
Jan
18
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
@jjmusicnotes: I don't know; as I said I just heard this claim "it makes you louder", and I'd like to know in which sense of "loud" this is true or whether it's simply bogus.
Jan
17
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
I mean by "phase-locked channels", each channel can be interpreted as the result of an LTI transformation applied to the same signal. So for any given frequency, there is only a fixed (and often small!) phase difference between both channels. Whereas when instruments are playing together, each note will, regardless of pitch, have a completely random phase difference.
Jan
17
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
What do you mean by a "true stereo signal"? For an ordinary stereo-mic recording, the channels certainly are locked (at some complex, but fixed relation, for any stationary source). For a mix with signals not panned hard left/right even more so. — If you record the stereo channels as completely separate takes, then there is indeed no phase correlation, but that's almost never done (and for such a signal, you would in fact not notice a difference when reversing one channel's polarity).
Jan
17
comment Violin E string
Pretty sure it's the higher one. I don't think you can possibly have tuned the e-string one octave too high, it would break either the string or the violin...
Jan
17
comment Violin E string
And once you've got that right, acquaint yourself to the sound of fifths that each pair of neighbouring strings should produce. (Incidentally, those are just fifths, so the e is actually 660 Hz rather than 659.3, unless you want a meantone tuning.)
Jan
17
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
If you connect one of two stereo speakers with inverse polarity, the speakers are still phase-locked together. That's what never happens with instruments in an ensemble, regardless of intonation. (And FWIW, the "clear effect anywhere" of phase reversal only happens in the bass range, due to wavelength>≈separation; for treble frequencies the switching of the phase may be notable as some change in sound, but only near-field monitors make it really obvious which polarity is correct.)
Jan
17
comment Does good intonation alone really make you “louder”? If yes, why?
ANC uses a known phase relation between a microphone on the outside of headphones, and the hp-speakers on the inside to always generate destructive interference at one single spot, namely the eardrum. This does (of course) not violate conservation of energy: summed over all space, the active NC actually makes the noise louder. Just because only your eardrums notice the sound at all, you feel it's made quiter. — Real musical instruments, even when played in perfect just intonation, don't phase-lock. Even if they did, room reflections would scramble the phases. So this argument doesn't work.