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Sep
27
comment Wrong Time Signature or Syncopated?
I don't think this is relevant to this question. In a rock groove, it's not really true at all that beats 1 and 3 are “strong” while 2 and 4 are weak. In fact it's rather the opposite: 2 and 4 are indicated by clear accents on the snare drum. In the example song, the drums make it thus quite unmistakable that the signature is 4+3/4, instead of 4/4 with syncopated chord changes. Of course you could still interpret this some other way with both chords and drums on unusual beats, but this would be rather more complicated. Better apply Occam's razor.
Sep
19
comment Is there indian music that is not “mono chord”?
I see what you mean and why you're curious, but possibly this question can't really be answered. Note that the concept of chords isn't something universal – in fact it's rather specific to western music after ~1800. It evolved out of particular patterns in three- or four-voice counterpoint, which in turn is based on the concept of consonant and dissonant intervals. But AFAIK, Indian music has traditionally no such concepts, so it doesn't really make sense to even talk about chords.
Sep
6
comment Amplifying a Classical Guitar, Electric Guitar, and Keyboard
Why do you need any amplification at all to play classical guitar in your living-room??
Aug
31
comment Why does my mono microphone have a three-pin plug?
I tend to ask myself, why to so many instruments use those @#^$%^ unbalanced jacks, instead of decent XLR connections which would actually work reliably...
Aug
31
comment What contributes to the roughness of a sound?
I wouldn't agree that white noise “isn't rough at all”. Just, it's usually quieter!
Aug
27
comment What's the reason for having a large number of guitars?
@DaveEngineer you'd be surprised, cellos can sound pretty different – not as different as, say, Strat vs. Les Paul, but quite as different as any two of the same model compared. Only, most players will largely settle to the sonic qualities of one particular instrument, and to some degree you can't tell which parts of the sound are due to the instrument and which are due to the player.
Aug
25
comment Can these sounds be created with an electric guitar or do I need an acoustic one?
...and I don't think Parker, Godin & co intend their piëzo-equipped guitars “for the sole purpose of enabling the guitars to sound more like an acoustic guitar”. Both are progressive brands and want to create new stuff, not just imitate things that already exist. Interestingly, Line6 uses piëzos in their guitars... mostly, to enable them to sound more like (many different) electric guitars! Because as a matter of fact, a piëzo captures the string vibrations more directly/completely than a magnetic PU.
Aug
25
comment Can these sounds be created with an electric guitar or do I need an acoustic one?
@RockinCowboy: well... the strings oscillate mechanically in either case, so if you go by the physical definition you'd need to call any guitar “acoustic”. My point is that piëzos still capture almost directly the string vibrations, moderated only by the bridge but not by the whole body. Of course, they also catch some secondary vibrations from the body, but again: so do magnetic PUs! (As the body response affects the strings themselves.)
Aug
22
comment Guitar intonation issue - still sharp but screw as far as it'll go
Hm. Is it possible that the neck is twisted?
Aug
21
comment Can these sounds be created with an electric guitar or do I need an acoustic one?
@RockinCowboy: calling a piëzo an “acoustic pickup” is a bit misleading. What's true is just that these pickups don't have the characteristic mid-boost and treble cutoff known from high-impedance magnetic pickups (also no comb filtering), hence their sound is often perceived closer to an acoustic guitar than to an electric guitar. But it's still something completely different, because the hollow-body resonance is missing. FWIW, low-impedance magnetic pickups have a similarly open sound, in fact I rather prefer them to piëzos when it comes to amplifying steelstring acoustic guitar.
Aug
21
comment Strange waveform from microphone
That's not a waveform, it's a peak diagram. Actually these weird shapes could just be some aliasing artifact that only happens in the creation of the peak display. Could you post the actual sample data somewhere (ideally as a .flac file, since lossy codecs tend not to properly capture such phenomena), or at least insert a proper PDF of the signal?
Aug
21
comment Guitar intonation issue - still sharp but screw as far as it'll go
I suspect the action of the treble strings is too high. What are those fret buzz problems you're talking about? If they occur mostly on the bass strings, just “roll” the bridge more (bass strings higher, trebles lower). If they occur on the trebles, but only on low frets, try relaxing the truss rod a bit. — For another thing: how and on what fret did you actually determine that the b string is still to high in intonation?
Aug
18
comment Piano or violin for a guitarist?
@JacobSwanson: well, it's not necessarily the question's fault if the answers are similar. But are they, even? Most answers to the linked question (including yours) are mainly general advice on how to start doing music without a teacher without getting discouraged, and so on. That's not relevant to somebody who's already learned an instrument. Neither is it relevant that piano is a more useful tool for understanding music theory, because guitar already does that job too.
Aug
17
comment How Long Can an Anacrucis Be?
I believe that Für Elise actually ends each phrase in a 6/4 bar, only, Beethoven didn't write it out because he though meter changes would confuse players.
Aug
14
comment Piano or violin for a guitarist?
I agree that learning both is the right answer – however, I'd take a different conclusion: because piano is practically inevitable anyway for any western musician, but violin is not, one should make a deliberate commitment to learn violin ASAP. Otherwise, the “will learn both” is likely to not be fulfilled, because violin is so hard (and it doesn't get easier to start with it later).
Aug
14
comment Piano or violin for a guitarist?
@JacobSwanson: it's not a duplicate, because that question says “I have no musical background or whatsoever”. That's quite a crucial difference here.
Aug
14
comment Piano or violin for a guitarist?
Agree with @dwoz, violin fits easily in as many genres as piano. In fact, I couldn't name a style where you could not use violin, but there are many styles where piano quite fundamentally doesn't work (to name two: most indian music, due to microtonality, as well as most metal styles, due to lack of ability to “chunk” rythms). Piano is more common in past-1950 western popular music, but that's about it.
Aug
12
comment Learning to play bass guitar: Fretless vs Fretted
@dwoz: Please read. I said “almost impossible”. Sure, you can slap and tap and everything on fretless. Whether it makes musically sense is more debatable (FWIW, I actually do it sometimes live when I can't be bothered to switch to fretted). My comment about action etc. was even more qualified: fretless basses are often set up lighter since it emphasises their particular character, but I never claimed all are. (Hence, it's an ininitrisical point!) Regarding fret wear, well, that obviously has a lot to do with the material too. My stainless steel jumbo frets are doing pretty well.
Aug
12
comment Learning to play bass guitar: Fretless vs Fretted
@dwoz: aha. Now I know this. I don't suppose you would have any more concrete criticism?
Aug
11
comment Solo's on the 12 bar blues in A
“After all, there are only 12 notes” – I rather disagree. Blues guitar uses microtonality all over the place.