Reputation
3,328
Top tag
Next privilege 3,500 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
4 21
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~58k people reached

Jun
24
comment Should pedals be used when playing classical piano music?
@supercat Yes, indeed. The point is that a modern piano note, especially in the bass, sustains for a noticeably longer time at a higher volume, and what is an ethereal effect on a fortepiano is quite muddy with a modern piano. In the Tempest sonata that I mention above, most performers (Gould is an exception, as he so often is) half-pedal that section to keep the notes from running together too much.
Jun
22
comment Should pedals be used when playing classical piano music?
@supercat My observations are limited to a comparison of a piano with a wooden harp with a modern piano with a cast-iron harp.
Jun
22
comment A question about quarter notes
@Tim I got one of those pedants, too. :)
Jun
20
comment Mastering double trills
If you keep at it in the right way, it will come to you eventually. :)
Jun
20
comment Is this type of sound wave possible (Picture)
@MeaningfulUsername What knowledge I have of this stuff comes from a time when a seven-note sequencer was state of the art and about the size of a Hammond organ. I've dug around on google, and it looks like they're related. What the actual relationship is I can't say, although most of what I'm reading says that the wah-wah effect comes from a variable band-pass filter which is a bit different from phase shifting. I'd have to dig up my college textbooks from 30 years ago to give you a better response, and they're 2000 miles away in a storage unit at present. So, I'd say go with what you know.
Jun
20
comment A question about quarter notes
@Tim: true, there are a few "demisemihemidemisemiquavers", or 256th notes, running around. I think the only ones I've seen in a score are four of the in the adagio variation of Mozart's "Je suis Lindor" piano variations. And of course there are theoretically many more divisions (I think Sibelius supports up to 4096th notes, don't ask me how many semis and hemis those would have), which modern composers sometimes use to be different.
Jun
20
comment A question about quarter notes
Tim's point is that a breve is a "whole" entity, so a semibreve, being half a breve, is not; therefore a breve should be a whole note, and a by extension a 128th note should be a 256th note, and so on. The opposing point is that since the semibreve/whole note has been the largest value in general use for at least 200 years, calling a semibreve a whole note is reasonable. I fall in the latter camp.
Jun
20
comment A question about quarter notes
At the risk of sounding precocious, though...at least if you say it loud enough.
Jun
20
comment Are whole notes/rests really used to signify variable lengths of time?
I wouldn't characterize as informal the use of a whole rest to mean rest for an entire measure, since at least 99% of all formal music notation uses it this way. Furthermore, I wouldn't avoid it either. It is far and away the most readable notation.
Jun
20
comment Are whole notes/rests really used to signify variable lengths of time?
This is the most usual practice (I've sometimes seen dotted whole rests in 3/2 time, especially with dotted whole notes running around), and yes, it does apply only to the whole rest. @KilianFoth: in my speculation, a whole rest just means ignore that measure in that staff. Much easier to read than having different sorts of rests that would add up to the same thing.
Jun
20
comment How to help students remember Half vs. Whole rests
It is usual to use a whole rest to mean rest for the whole measure, regardless of how many beats there are per measure. Of course, this is never done with notes, just rests. Now, in 3/2 time, you'll sometimes see a dotted whole rest, especially in passages with dotted whole notes. @Warlord099: In 2/4, you will not see a half rest (bar on top of middle line); a whole rest will have two beats in this case. The reason for all this is simply readability. A whole rest means ignore that staff for that measure. Frequent changes of meter don't change this IMHO.
Jun
20
comment What attribute of sound will be identical (or close to) for multiple people receiving same input from different locations
An interesting theory is that it is that "much more complicated" analysis that causes people to go to sleep during performances. It would be an interesting experiment to play a concert in a church and in a concert hall with good acoustics, to see if people were more likely to go to sleep in the former.
Jun
20
comment A question about quarter notes
@Patrx2: Indeed so, while creating a host of other problems that are worse, of course. Can you say semihemidemisemiquaver? I can, but only with difficulty after years of practice. :D
Jun
20
reviewed No Action Needed What is the guitar tecnique used in Suede's performance at The White Room?
Jun
20
comment Is this type of sound wave possible (Picture)
For an auditory example of the effect of phase, listen to a "phase shifter" in operation. A phase shifter superimposes two (usually equivalent) signals, and changes the phase on one of them relative to another. The most commonly known phase shifter is the "wa-wa pedal." Pressing the pedal causes the two signals to go out of phase and cancel one another out to a large extent.
Jun
19
comment Mastering double trills
You have to keep working at this. I was in my junior year as a piano major before I had a breakthrough with trills in 4-5. The first part of that breakthrough is avoid them where possible! But seriously, I could suddenly easily do mordents with those fingers, and trills weren't too far behind. Not that I ever learned to do them as well as with 2-3 or whatever. And I still can't do them in my left hand very well.
Jun
19
answered Mastering double trills
Jun
19
comment Mastering double trills
What you are calling a fact is actually more of a performance guideline. Until fairly recently, music editors regularly took it upon themselves to write out such things, including Peters' editors. While I don't have a facsimile of Chopin's manuscript to get the last word on this, some of the editions on the page you've linked have the upper auxiliary notes written out and some don't. The OP's edition looks to be Schirmer, not the most reliable source either. Next, while most performers that I looked at start on the auxiliary, some do not, most notably Rubinstein.
Jun
18
comment Mastering double trills
The notes are A# B in the bottom and Cx D# in the top for the first trill, with the second one having the Cx drop to C# and all the other notes the same. alephzero has it right.
Jun
18
reviewed Approve What exactly is a scale, what are they for, and how does practising them make me a better guitarist?