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seen Jul 30 '11 at 0:31

PhD student.


Jul
28
awarded  Supporter
Jul
28
comment Question from non-musician: Is it possible to learn sight-singing without having learned an instrument?
(cont.) The second approach is to read it the way I read C-major, but shift the tone by half when there's a # or b sign. This is even more problematic for me, since when I see C, I think of "Do" to get the correct pitch. When my ear is surrounded by music in D major, when I think of "Do" I would automatically sing the D note. So my system of reading music based on solfege is completely messed up.
Jul
28
comment Question from non-musician: Is it possible to learn sight-singing without having learned an instrument?
(Cont.) I reckon there are two ways of dealing with music that's not in C major. The first is to transpose "do, re, mi" to the proper location on the staff, which is different for every different scale. (The so called "movable Do".) The problem is that it's hard to remember the location for each single scale, and even more impossible to develop quick reflexes for each of them.
Jul
28
comment Question from non-musician: Is it possible to learn sight-singing without having learned an instrument?
Thanks all of you for answering! Actually I was taught solfege when I was young. So I recognize the relative pitches of the notes on a major scale (but not others). As a result I am able to read, e.g. sheet music without # and b signs, in C major. However, when there are lots of # and b signs, either to indicate a different major/minor scale, or sporadically occurring in the music itself, I get completely lost.
Jul
27
awarded  Student
Jul
27
asked Question from non-musician: Is it possible to learn sight-singing without having learned an instrument?