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bio website twitter.com/daryl993manggip
location Malaysia
age
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Dec 24 '13 at 1:28

Nov
16
comment What are the most common barriers to becoming proficient at playing an instrument?
No problem. When I said trying to speed up is bad, I meant speeding up regardless of technical problems. Repeating a mistake several times due to forcing the speed only causes the mistake to be ingrained into muscle memory, making it harder to correct later on. Speeding up once in a while to tell where can be a great practice technique as long as you go back to repeating it slowly. As to learning pulse/rhythm, I am only speaking from experience. I am not a teacher, so I may not be qualified to give solutions to these problems. I'm sure that all the ensemble playing I did before helped me.
Jul
28
comment Question from non-musician: Is it possible to learn sight-singing without having learned an instrument?
(Cont.) With practice, you should be able to recognize the sound of the interval without having to count each syllable. Once you have learned the sound of each interval, then you can start from any note in any key and sing the melody based on the starting note and the distance between each note, even if you do not know the exact name of each note.
Jul
28
comment Question from non-musician: Is it possible to learn sight-singing without having learned an instrument?
@felix That is why I suggested that you learn to recognize intervals on the staff and by ear. That way, instead of seeing the notes and associating it with a solfege syllable, we see the distance between two notes and sing the correct interval. For example, in the key of D major, if we see the note D going to F# (major 3rd interval) then, using the solfege, we would be able to sing Do Mi simply by looking at the distance. A major third interval means that the notes are three notes away from each other on the scale. Meaning if the first note is Do, then we would count Do(1) Re(2) Mi(3).