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If your daughter has to practise on it, the ideal would be to have an accoustic piano. Then, if you want to use it for electronic music maybe you can have a look at pianos with "silent" mechanism. I know Yamaha makes them; I don't know about other brands, but probably they do also. They are normal accoustic pianos that incorporate a mechanism that, when active, makes the piano work as an electronic keyboard with headphones. Just make sure the silent mechanism has a MIDI / USB output thet fits your needs.

If you don't like this, or you cannot afford it, you have the option of a digital piano. But if you buy a digital piano for your daughter, even if she is only 6 and just a beginner, please note: it is of upmostutmost importance that the keyboard is fully weighted and 88 keys (not smaller, and not lighter).

There is the option of hybrid pianos also. But they are expensive (not really much cheaper than accoustic pianos... at least in my country) and, for your daughter, an accoustic will always be better than anything electronic.

In your case, I'd say give always priority to your daughter's needs as piano student, and buy the best piano you can afford in terms of sound, mechanism and overall quality. For your electronic work you don't need a keyboard with tons of functions; you only need MIDI output capabilities, and you can do the rest via software with your computer.

If your daughter has to practise on it, the ideal would be to have an accoustic piano. Then, if you want to use it for electronic music maybe you can have a look at pianos with "silent" mechanism. I know Yamaha makes them; I don't know about other brands, but probably they do also. They are normal accoustic pianos that incorporate a mechanism that, when active, makes the piano work as an electronic keyboard with headphones. Just make sure the silent mechanism has a MIDI / USB output thet fits your needs.

If you don't like this, or you cannot afford it, you have the option of a digital piano. But if you buy a digital piano for your daughter, even if she is only 6 and just a beginner, please note: it is of upmost importance that the keyboard is fully weighted and 88 keys (not smaller, and not lighter).

There is the option of hybrid pianos also. But they are expensive (not really much cheaper than accoustic pianos... at least in my country) and, for your daughter, an accoustic will always be better than anything electronic.

In your case, I'd say give always priority to your daughter's needs as piano student, and buy the best piano you can afford in terms of sound, mechanism and overall quality. For your electronic work you don't need a keyboard with tons of functions; you only need MIDI output capabilities, and you can do the rest via software with your computer.

If your daughter has to practise on it, the ideal would be to have an accoustic piano. Then, if you want to use it for electronic music maybe you can have a look at pianos with "silent" mechanism. I know Yamaha makes them; I don't know about other brands, but probably they do also. They are normal accoustic pianos that incorporate a mechanism that, when active, makes the piano work as an electronic keyboard with headphones. Just make sure the silent mechanism has a MIDI / USB output thet fits your needs.

If you don't like this, or you cannot afford it, you have the option of a digital piano. But if you buy a digital piano for your daughter, even if she is only 6 and just a beginner, please note: it is of utmost importance that the keyboard is fully weighted and 88 keys (not smaller, and not lighter).

There is the option of hybrid pianos also. But they are expensive (not really much cheaper than accoustic pianos... at least in my country) and, for your daughter, an accoustic will always be better than anything electronic.

In your case, I'd say give always priority to your daughter's needs as piano student, and buy the best piano you can afford in terms of sound, mechanism and overall quality. For your electronic work you don't need a keyboard with tons of functions; you only need MIDI output capabilities, and you can do the rest via software with your computer.

2 deleted 53 characters in body
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If your daughter has to practise on it, the ideal would be to have an accoustic piano. Then, if you want to use it for electronic music maybe you can have a look at pianos with "silent" mechanism. I know Yamaha makes them; I don't know about other brands, but probably they do also. They are normal accoustic pianos that incorporate a mechanism that, when active, makes the piano work as an electronic keyboard with headphones. Just make sure the silent mechanism has a MIDI / USB output thet fits your needs.

If you don't like this, or you cannot afford it, you have the option of a digital piano. But if you buy a digital piano for your daughter, even if she is only 6 and just a beginner, please note: it is of upmost importance that the keyboard is fully weighted and 88 keys (not smaller, and not lighter).

There is the option of hybrid pianos also. The best you can get in this is a Yamaha Avantgrand. But they are expensive (not really much cheaper than accoustic pianos... at least in my country) and, for your daughter, an accoustic will always be better than anything electronic.

In your case, I'd say give always priority to your daughter's needs as piano student, and buy the best piano you can afford in terms of sound, mechanism and overall quality. For your electronic work you don't need a keyboard with tons of functions; you only need MIDI output capabilities, and you can do the rest via software with your computer.

If your daughter has to practise on it, the ideal would be to have an accoustic piano. Then, if you want to use it for electronic music maybe you can have a look at pianos with "silent" mechanism. I know Yamaha makes them; I don't know about other brands, but probably they do also. They are normal accoustic pianos that incorporate a mechanism that, when active, makes the piano work as an electronic keyboard with headphones. Just make sure the silent mechanism has a MIDI / USB output thet fits your needs.

If you don't like this, or you cannot afford it, you have the option of a digital piano. But if you buy a digital piano for your daughter, even if she is only 6 and just a beginner, please note: it is of upmost importance that the keyboard is fully weighted and 88 keys (not smaller, and not lighter).

There is the option of hybrid pianos also. The best you can get in this is a Yamaha Avantgrand. But they are expensive (not really much cheaper than accoustic pianos... at least in my country) and, for your daughter, an accoustic will always be better than anything electronic.

In your case, I'd say give always priority to your daughter's needs as piano student, and buy the best piano you can afford in terms of sound, mechanism and overall quality. For your electronic work you don't need a keyboard with tons of functions; you only need MIDI output capabilities, and you can do the rest via software with your computer.

If your daughter has to practise on it, the ideal would be to have an accoustic piano. Then, if you want to use it for electronic music maybe you can have a look at pianos with "silent" mechanism. I know Yamaha makes them; I don't know about other brands, but probably they do also. They are normal accoustic pianos that incorporate a mechanism that, when active, makes the piano work as an electronic keyboard with headphones. Just make sure the silent mechanism has a MIDI / USB output thet fits your needs.

If you don't like this, or you cannot afford it, you have the option of a digital piano. But if you buy a digital piano for your daughter, even if she is only 6 and just a beginner, please note: it is of upmost importance that the keyboard is fully weighted and 88 keys (not smaller, and not lighter).

There is the option of hybrid pianos also. But they are expensive (not really much cheaper than accoustic pianos... at least in my country) and, for your daughter, an accoustic will always be better than anything electronic.

In your case, I'd say give always priority to your daughter's needs as piano student, and buy the best piano you can afford in terms of sound, mechanism and overall quality. For your electronic work you don't need a keyboard with tons of functions; you only need MIDI output capabilities, and you can do the rest via software with your computer.

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If your daughter has to practise on it, the ideal would be to have an accoustic piano. Then, if you want to use it for electronic music maybe you can have a look at pianos with "silent" mechanism. I know Yamaha makes them; I don't know about other brands, but probably they do also. They are normal accoustic pianos that incorporate a mechanism that, when active, makes the piano work as an electronic keyboard with headphones. Just make sure the silent mechanism has a MIDI / USB output thet fits your needs.

If you don't like this, or you cannot afford it, you have the option of a digital piano. But if you buy a digital piano for your daughter, even if she is only 6 and just a beginner, please note: it is of upmost importance that the keyboard is fully weighted and 88 keys (not smaller, and not lighter).

There is the option of hybrid pianos also. The best you can get in this is a Yamaha Avantgrand. But they are expensive (not really much cheaper than accoustic pianos... at least in my country) and, for your daughter, an accoustic will always be better than anything electronic.

In your case, I'd say give always priority to your daughter's needs as piano student, and buy the best piano you can afford in terms of sound, mechanism and overall quality. For your electronic work you don't need a keyboard with tons of functions; you only need MIDI output capabilities, and you can do the rest via software with your computer.