3 fingering edit
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Slight correction to Tim's nice explanation above: Tim wrote, "So, the Am7 in your example will be A,C,E and G.Since A is the 1, and the root note, and there's a 7 and a minor 3, it gets called Am7."

Actually, it is the root note A, a flat minor 3rd C, major 5th E, and a flat dominant 7th G, which makes it an Amin7.


F/E is commonly listed as an F chord in the open position, but with an E as the bass note. The index finger barring the 1st fret of the first and second string is an F (1) and C (5), the indexmiddle finger on the 2nd fret of the third string is an A (3), and the ring finger on the 3rd fret of the 4 string is an F (1). So this alone is an F chord with 5th and 6th strings muted. Musicians often strum the open 5th and 6th string, So the 6th string is the bass, which is an E; and the open 5th string is an A, which is again the 3rd of the F chord as outlined above.

Slight correction to Tim's nice explanation above: Tim wrote, "So, the Am7 in your example will be A,C,E and G.Since A is the 1, and the root note, and there's a 7 and a minor 3, it gets called Am7."

Actually, it is the root note A, a flat minor 3rd C, major 5th E, and a flat dominant 7th G, which makes it an Amin7.


F/E is commonly listed as an F chord in the open position, but with an E as the bass note. The index finger barring the 1st fret of the first and second string is an F (1) and C (5), the index finger on the 2nd fret of the third string is an A (3), and the ring finger on the 3rd fret of the 4 string is an F (1). So this alone is an F chord with 5th and 6th strings muted. Musicians often strum the open 5th and 6th string, So the 6th string is the bass, which is an E; and the open 5th string is an A, which is again the 3rd of the F chord as outlined above.

Slight correction to Tim's nice explanation above: Tim wrote, "So, the Am7 in your example will be A,C,E and G.Since A is the 1, and the root note, and there's a 7 and a minor 3, it gets called Am7."

Actually, it is the root note A, a flat minor 3rd C, major 5th E, and a flat dominant 7th G, which makes it an Amin7.


F/E is commonly listed as an F chord in the open position, but with an E as the bass note. The index finger barring the 1st fret of the first and second string is an F (1) and C (5), the middle finger on the 2nd fret of the third string is an A (3), and the ring finger on the 3rd fret of the 4 string is an F (1). So this alone is an F chord with 5th and 6th strings muted. Musicians often strum the open 5th and 6th string, So the 6th string is the bass, which is an E; and the open 5th string is an A, which is again the 3rd of the F chord as outlined above.

2 Clarification of initial post.
source | link

Slight correction to Tim's nice explanation above: Tim wrote, "So, the Am7 in your example will be A,C,E and G.Since A is the 1, and the root note, and there's a 7 and a minor 3, it gets called Am7."

Actually, it is the root note A, a flat minor 3rd C, major 5th E, and a flat dominant 7th G, which makes it an Amin7.


F/E is commonly listed as an F chord in the open position, but with an E as the bass note. The index finger barring the 1st fret of the first and second string is an F (1) and C (5), the index finger on the 2nd fret of the third string is an A (3), and the ring finger on the 3rd fret of the 4 string is an F (1). So this alone is an F chord with 5th and 6th strings muted. Musicians often strum the open 5th and 6th string, So the 6th string is the bass, which is an E; and the open 5th string is an A, which is again the 3rd of the F chord as outlined above.

Slight correction to Tim's nice explanation above: Tim wrote, "So, the Am7 in your example will be A,C,E and G.Since A is the 1, and the root note, and there's a 7 and a minor 3, it gets called Am7."

Actually, it is the root note A, a flat 3rd C, major 5th E, and a flat 7th G, which makes it an Amin7.

Slight correction to Tim's nice explanation above: Tim wrote, "So, the Am7 in your example will be A,C,E and G.Since A is the 1, and the root note, and there's a 7 and a minor 3, it gets called Am7."

Actually, it is the root note A, a flat minor 3rd C, major 5th E, and a flat dominant 7th G, which makes it an Amin7.


F/E is commonly listed as an F chord in the open position, but with an E as the bass note. The index finger barring the 1st fret of the first and second string is an F (1) and C (5), the index finger on the 2nd fret of the third string is an A (3), and the ring finger on the 3rd fret of the 4 string is an F (1). So this alone is an F chord with 5th and 6th strings muted. Musicians often strum the open 5th and 6th string, So the 6th string is the bass, which is an E; and the open 5th string is an A, which is again the 3rd of the F chord as outlined above.

1
source | link

Slight correction to Tim's nice explanation above: Tim wrote, "So, the Am7 in your example will be A,C,E and G.Since A is the 1, and the root note, and there's a 7 and a minor 3, it gets called Am7."

Actually, it is the root note A, a flat 3rd C, major 5th E, and a flat 7th G, which makes it an Amin7.