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tl;dr People don't like it because they don't actually know what it is.


There has been and will always be a stigma against music theory and studying it. Some of the reasons I've heard on this very site are:

  • Music is artistic and no theory can explain art.
  • It makes you think rather than play.
  • X musician doesn't know theory so I don't have to.

There are many more arguments and while I could counter each and every one, it outlines a problem that needs to be addressed. The biggest problem is people don't understand what music theory is. People take or see an intro music theory where your hand is being held to learn and compose a certiant style and it scares most people away without them seeing a bigger picture.

Music Theory in the simplest is the study of what works and what doesn't in music and mainly focuses on tools that help you get there by dissecting a piece of music. The tools that you are given help by formal Music Theory really help in this aspect with the only flaw being they are specifically geared for a specific era of music and while it lines up pretty well with most current ones, it's not a exact. The theory itself won't tell you if it sounds good or bad to you, but it will give you the tool and terminology needed for you to find if in a more objective way. 

So while there is a formal path for studying the subject, simple things like someone listening to a song and figuring out what you like and what you don't is also music theory. Every musician I know does this even the ones that speak out against theory, just the ones without theory have a much more round about way to get there/describe it.

Most people only equate music theory to an intro class that focuses on the classical era which most modern types of western music are rooted in, but there is so much more. There are pop, jazz, blues, and rock music theory classes and books that focus much more on modern songs and deconstructing them so people can learn what works and what doesn't and even focuses on slightly different types of analysis that are better geared for them. People who study music theory in depth eventually tailor their ideas towards what they find works and what doesn't using what they learned as a foundation for this and utilizes this in what they compose.

This to my knowledge is the only subject that has this problem. Even in other artistic fields like film and art the study is extremely important and no one complains about that affecting the artistic value or creativity of them.

tl;dr People don't like it because they don't actually know what it is.


There has been and will always be a stigma against music theory and studying it. Some of the reasons I've heard on this very site are:

  • Music is artistic and no theory can explain art.
  • It makes you think rather than play.
  • X musician doesn't know theory so I don't have to.

There are many more arguments and while I could counter each and every one, it outlines a problem that needs to be addressed. The biggest problem is people don't understand what music theory is. People take or see an intro music theory where your hand is being held to learn and compose a certiant style and it scares most people away without them seeing a bigger picture.

Music Theory in the simplest is the study of what works and what doesn't in music. So while there is a formal path for studying the subject, simple things like someone listening to a song and figuring out what you like and what you don't is also music theory. Every musician I know does this even the ones that speak out against theory.

Most people only equate music theory to an intro class that focuses on the classical era which most modern types of western music are rooted in, but there is so much more. There are pop, jazz, blues, and rock music theory classes and books that focus much more on modern songs and deconstructing them so people can learn what works and what doesn't. People who study music theory in depth eventually tailor their ideas towards what they find works and what doesn't using what they learned as a foundation for this and utilizes this in what they compose.

This to my knowledge is the only subject that has this problem. Even in other artistic fields like film and art the study is extremely important and no one complains about that affecting the artistic value or creativity of them.

tl;dr People don't like it because they don't actually know what it is.


There has been and will always be a stigma against music theory and studying it. Some of the reasons I've heard on this very site are:

  • Music is artistic and no theory can explain art.
  • It makes you think rather than play.
  • X musician doesn't know theory so I don't have to.

There are many more arguments and while I could counter each and every one, it outlines a problem that needs to be addressed. The biggest problem is people don't understand what music theory is. People take or see an intro music theory where your hand is being held to learn and compose a certiant style and it scares most people away without them seeing a bigger picture.

Music Theory in the simplest is the study of what works and what doesn't in music and mainly focuses on tools that help you get there by dissecting a piece of music. The tools that you are given help by formal Music Theory really help in this aspect with the only flaw being they are specifically geared for a specific era of music and while it lines up pretty well with most current ones, it's not a exact. The theory itself won't tell you if it sounds good or bad to you, but it will give you the tool and terminology needed for you to find if in a more objective way. 

So while there is a formal path for studying the subject, simple things like someone listening to a song and figuring out what you like and what you don't is also music theory. Every musician I know does this even the ones that speak out against theory, just the ones without theory have a much more round about way to get there/describe it.

Most people only equate music theory to an intro class that focuses on the classical era which most modern types of western music are rooted in, but there is so much more. There are pop, jazz, blues, and rock music theory classes and books that focus much more on modern songs and deconstructing them so people can learn what works and what doesn't and even focuses on slightly different types of analysis that are better geared for them. People who study music theory in depth eventually tailor their ideas towards what they find works and what doesn't using what they learned as a foundation for this and utilizes this in what they compose.

This to my knowledge is the only subject that has this problem. Even in other artistic fields like film and art the study is extremely important and no one complains about that affecting the artistic value or creativity of them.

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tl;dr People don't like it because they don't actually know what it is.


There has been and will always be a stigma against music theory and studying it. Some of the reasons I've heard on this very site are:

  • Music is artistic and no theory can explain art.
  • It makes you think rather than play.
  • X musician doesn't know theory so I don't have to.

There are many more arguments and while I could counter each and every one, it outlines a problem that needs to be addressed. The biggest problem is people don't understand what music theory is. People take or see an intro music theory where your hand is being held to learn and compose a certiant style and it scares most people away without them seeing a bigger picture.

Music Theory in the simplest is the study of what works and what doesn't in music. So while there is a formal path for studying the subject, simple things like someone listening to a song and figuring out what theyyou like and what theyyou don't is also music theory. Every musician I know does this even the ones that speak out against theory.

Most people only equate music theory to an intro class that focuses on the classical era which most modern types of western music are rooted in, but there is so much more. There are pop, jazz, blues, and rock music theory classes and books that focus much more on modern songs and deconstructing them so people can learn what works and what doesn't. People who study music theory in depth eventually tailor their ideas towards what they find works and what doesn't using what they learned as a foundation for this and utilizes this in what they compose.

This to my knowledge is the only subject that has this problem. Even in other artistic fields like film and art the study is extremely important and no one complains about that affecting the artistic value or creativity of them.

tl;dr People don't like it because they don't actually know what it is.


There has been and will always be a stigma against music theory and studying it. Some of the reasons I've heard on this very site are:

  • Music is artistic and no theory can explain art.
  • It makes you think rather than play.
  • X musician doesn't know theory so I don't have to.

There are many more arguments and while I could counter each and every one, it outlines a that needs to be addressed. The biggest problem is people don't understand what music theory is. People take or see an intro music theory where your hand is being held to learn and compose a certiant style and it scares most people away without them seeing a bigger picture.

Music Theory in the simplest is the study of what works and what doesn't in music. So while there is a formal path for studying the subject, simple things like someone listening to a song and figuring out what they like and what they don't is also music theory. Every musician I know does this even the ones that speak out against theory.

Most people only equate music theory to an intro class that focuses on the classical era which most modern types of western music are rooted in, but there is so much more. There are pop, jazz, blues, and rock music theory classes and books that focus much more on modern songs and deconstructing them so people can learn what works and what doesn't. People who study music theory in depth eventually tailor their ideas towards what they find works and what doesn't using what they learned as a foundation for this and utilizes this in what they compose.

This to my knowledge is the only subject that has this problem. Even in other artistic fields like film and art the study is extremely important and no one complains about that affecting the artistic value or creativity of them.

tl;dr People don't like it because they don't actually know what it is.


There has been and will always be a stigma against music theory and studying it. Some of the reasons I've heard on this very site are:

  • Music is artistic and no theory can explain art.
  • It makes you think rather than play.
  • X musician doesn't know theory so I don't have to.

There are many more arguments and while I could counter each and every one, it outlines a problem that needs to be addressed. The biggest problem is people don't understand what music theory is. People take or see an intro music theory where your hand is being held to learn and compose a certiant style and it scares most people away without them seeing a bigger picture.

Music Theory in the simplest is the study of what works and what doesn't in music. So while there is a formal path for studying the subject, simple things like someone listening to a song and figuring out what you like and what you don't is also music theory. Every musician I know does this even the ones that speak out against theory.

Most people only equate music theory to an intro class that focuses on the classical era which most modern types of western music are rooted in, but there is so much more. There are pop, jazz, blues, and rock music theory classes and books that focus much more on modern songs and deconstructing them so people can learn what works and what doesn't. People who study music theory in depth eventually tailor their ideas towards what they find works and what doesn't using what they learned as a foundation for this and utilizes this in what they compose.

This to my knowledge is the only subject that has this problem. Even in other artistic fields like film and art the study is extremely important and no one complains about that affecting the artistic value or creativity of them.

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source | link

tl;dr People don't like it because they don't actually know what it is.


There has been and will always be a stigma against music theory and studying it. Some of the reasons I've heard on this very site are:

  • Music is artistic and no theory can explain art.
  • It makes you think rather than play.
  • X musician doesn't know theory so I don't have to.

There are many more arguments and while I could counter each and every one, it outlines a that needs to be addressed. The biggest problem is people don't understand what music theory is. People take or see an intro music theory where your hand is being held to learn and compose a certiant style and it scares most people away without them seeing a bigger picture.

Music Theory in the simplest is the study of what works and what doesn't in music. So while there is a formal path for studying the subject, simple things like someone listening to a song and figuring out what they like and what they don't is also music theory. Every musician I know does this even the ones that speak out against theory.

Most people only equate music theory to an intro class that focuses on the classical era which most modern types of western music are rooted in, but there is so much more. There are pop, jazz, blues, and rock music theory classes and books that focus much more on modern songs and deconstructing them so people can learn what works and what doesn't. People who study music theory in depth eventually tailor their ideas towards what they find works and what doesn't using what they learned as a foundation for this and utilizes this in what they compose.

This to my knowledge is the only subject that has this problem. Even in other artistic fields like film and art the study is extremely important and no one complains about that affecting the artistic value or creativity of them.