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I'm in the habit of writing lead sheets down for songs I learn, and the second chord of this stumped me. The notes are, starting at the bottom, G#, F, B E.

The context is

| Am6 | % | chord x | % |

| Gm7 | C9 | FΔ | % |

| Fm6 | % | E7(b9) | A7#5 |

| D6 | Dm9 | F6 | Fm6 |

(the 4 bar turnaround can be done a million different ways, but this is just to give musical context)

The voicing of the first 3 chords would be something like:

enter image description hereenter image description here

You could call it G#o7(#5) (the best option I've come up with), but this implies a sharpened five, whereas to me, the E sounds like an extension rather than a modification of the diminished triad (i.e, if you could have both a D natural and an E natural in the chord and it wouldn't alter the quality of it). You could call it G#o7b13 or G#o7b13, but that implies the existence of a 9, which you doesn't work, and in any case, what would a 9 even mean in the context of a diminished chord? Gm6(#5) is no good, because it loses that it's a diminished chord altogether.

And outside of the more technical question of how to name it. What actually is it? It's tempting to just chalk this interesting chord up to "good voice leading", but I think it's more than that: it sounds remarkably "stable" for such a "dissonant" chord, if that makes any sense. Obviously the context really helps it, but it is a really interesting and gorgeous chord just in its own right.

I'm in the habit of writing lead sheets down for songs I learn, and the second chord of this stumped me. The notes are, starting at the bottom, G#, F, B E.

The context is

| Am6 | % | chord x | % |

| Gm7 | C9 | FΔ | % |

| Fm6 | % | E7(b9) | A7#5 |

| D6 | Dm9 | F6 | Fm6 |

(the 4 bar turnaround can be done a million different ways, but this is just to give musical context)

The voicing of the first 3 chords would be something like:

enter image description here

You could call it G#o7(#5) (the best option I've come up with), but this implies a sharpened five, whereas to me, the E sounds like an extension rather than a modification of the diminished triad (i.e, if you could have both a D natural and an E natural in the chord and it wouldn't alter the quality of it). You could call it G#o7b13 or G#o7b13, but that implies the existence of a 9, which you doesn't work, and in any case, what would a 9 even mean in the context of a diminished chord? Gm6(#5) is no good, because it loses that it's a diminished chord altogether.

And outside of the more technical question of how to name it. What actually is it? It's tempting to just chalk this interesting chord up to "good voice leading", but I think it's more than that: it sounds remarkably "stable" for such a "dissonant" chord, if that makes any sense. Obviously the context really helps it, but it is a really interesting and gorgeous chord just in its own right.

I'm in the habit of writing lead sheets down for songs I learn, and the second chord of this stumped me. The notes are, starting at the bottom, G#, F, B E.

The context is

| Am6 | % | chord x | % |

| Gm7 | C9 | FΔ | % |

| Fm6 | % | E7(b9) | A7#5 |

| D6 | Dm9 | F6 | Fm6 |

(the 4 bar turnaround can be done a million different ways, but this is just to give musical context)

The voicing of the first 3 chords would be something like:

enter image description here

You could call it G#o7(#5) (the best option I've come up with), but this implies a sharpened five, whereas to me, the E sounds like an extension rather than a modification of the diminished triad (i.e, if you could have both a D natural and an E natural in the chord and it wouldn't alter the quality of it). You could call it G#o7b13 or G#o7b13, but that implies the existence of a 9, which you doesn't work, and in any case, what would a 9 even mean in the context of a diminished chord? Gm6(#5) is no good, because it loses that it's a diminished chord altogether.

And outside of the more technical question of how to name it. What actually is it? It's tempting to just chalk this interesting chord up to "good voice leading", but I think it's more than that: it sounds remarkably "stable" for such a "dissonant" chord, if that makes any sense. Obviously the context really helps it, but it is a really interesting and gorgeous chord just in its own right.

3 updated score snippet without typo, lilypond
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I'm in the habit of writing lead sheets down for songs I learn, and the second chord of this stumped me. The notes are, starting at the bottom, G#, F, B E.

The context is

| Am6 | % | chord x | % |

| Gm7 | C9 | FΔ | % |

| Fm6 | % | E7(b9) | A7#5 |

| D6 | Dm9 | F6 | Fm6 |

(the 4 bar turnaround can be done a million different ways, but this is just to give musical context)

The voicing of the first 3 chords would be something like:

enter image description hereenter image description here

You could call it G#o7(#5) (the best option I've come up with), but this implies a sharpened five, whereas to me, the E sounds like an extension rather than a modification of the diminished triad (i.e, if you could have both a D natural and an E natural in the chord and it wouldn't alter the quality of it). You could call it G#o7b13 or G#o7b13, but that implies the existence of a 9, which you doesn't work, and in any case, what would a 9 even mean in the context of a diminished chord? Gm6(#5) is no good, because it loses that it's a diminished chord altogether.

And outside of the more technical question of how to name it. What actually is it? It's tempting to just chalk this interesting chord up to "good voice leading", but I think it's more than that: it sounds remarkably "stable" for such a "dissonant" chord, if that makes any sense. Obviously the context really helps it, but it is a really interesting and gorgeous chord just in its own right.

I'm in the habit of writing lead sheets down for songs I learn, and the second chord of this stumped me. The notes are, starting at the bottom, G#, F, B E.

The context is

| Am6 | % | chord x | % |

| Gm7 | C9 | FΔ | % |

| Fm6 | % | E7(b9) | A7#5 |

| D6 | Dm9 | F6 | Fm6 |

(the 4 bar turnaround can be done a million different ways, but this is just to give musical context)

The voicing of the first 3 chords would be something like:

enter image description here

You could call it G#o7(#5) (the best option I've come up with), but this implies a sharpened five, whereas to me, the E sounds like an extension rather than a modification of the diminished triad (i.e, if you could have both a D natural and an E natural in the chord and it wouldn't alter the quality of it). You could call it G#o7b13 or G#o7b13, but that implies the existence of a 9, which you doesn't work, and in any case, what would a 9 even mean in the context of a diminished chord? Gm6(#5) is no good, because it loses that it's a diminished chord altogether.

And outside of the more technical question of how to name it. What actually is it? It's tempting to just chalk this interesting chord up to "good voice leading", but I think it's more than that: it sounds remarkably "stable" for such a "dissonant" chord, if that makes any sense. Obviously the context really helps it, but it is a really interesting and gorgeous chord just in its own right.

I'm in the habit of writing lead sheets down for songs I learn, and the second chord of this stumped me. The notes are, starting at the bottom, G#, F, B E.

The context is

| Am6 | % | chord x | % |

| Gm7 | C9 | FΔ | % |

| Fm6 | % | E7(b9) | A7#5 |

| D6 | Dm9 | F6 | Fm6 |

(the 4 bar turnaround can be done a million different ways, but this is just to give musical context)

The voicing of the first 3 chords would be something like:

enter image description here

You could call it G#o7(#5) (the best option I've come up with), but this implies a sharpened five, whereas to me, the E sounds like an extension rather than a modification of the diminished triad (i.e, if you could have both a D natural and an E natural in the chord and it wouldn't alter the quality of it). You could call it G#o7b13 or G#o7b13, but that implies the existence of a 9, which you doesn't work, and in any case, what would a 9 even mean in the context of a diminished chord? Gm6(#5) is no good, because it loses that it's a diminished chord altogether.

And outside of the more technical question of how to name it. What actually is it? It's tempting to just chalk this interesting chord up to "good voice leading", but I think it's more than that: it sounds remarkably "stable" for such a "dissonant" chord, if that makes any sense. Obviously the context really helps it, but it is a really interesting and gorgeous chord just in its own right.

2 added 46 characters in body
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I'm in the habit of writing lead sheets down for songs I learn, and the second chord of this stumped me. The notes are, starting at the bottom, G#, F, B E.

The context is

| Am6 | % | chord x | % |

| Gm7 | C9 | FΔ | % |

| Fm6 | % | E7(b9) | A7#5 |

| D6 | Dm9 | F6 | Fm6 |

(the 4 bar turnaround can be done a million different ways, but this is just to give musical context)

The voicing of the first 3 chords would be something like:

enter image description here

You could call it G#o7(#5) (the best option I've come up with), but this implies a sharpened five, whereas to me, the E sounds like an extension rather than a modification of the diminished triad (i.e, if you could have both a D natural and an E natural in the chord and it wouldn't alter the quality of it). You could call it G#o7b13 or G#o7b13, but that implies the existence of a 9, which you doesn't work, and in any case, what would a 9 even mean in the context of a diminished chord? Gm6(#5) is no good, because it loses that it's a diminished chord altogether.

And outside of the more technical question of how to name it. What actually is it? It's tempting to just chalk this interesting chord up to "good voice leading", but I think it's more than that: it sounds remarkably "stable" for onesuch a "dissonant" chord, if that makes any sense. Obviously the context really helps it, but it is a really interesting and gorgeous chord just in its own right.

I'm in the habit of writing lead sheets down for songs I learn, and the second chord of this stumped me. The notes are, starting at the bottom, G#, F, B E.

The context is

| Am6 | % | chord x | % |

| Gm7 | C9 | FΔ | % |

| Fm6 | % | E7(b9) | A7#5 |

| D6 | Dm9 | F6 | Fm6 |

(the 4 bar turnaround can be done a million different ways, but this is just to give musical context)

The voicing of the first 3 chords would be something like:

enter image description here

You could call it G#o7(#5) (the best option I've come up with), but this implies a sharpened five, whereas to me, the E sounds like an extension rather than a modification of the diminished triad (i.e, if you could have both a D natural and an E natural in the chord and it wouldn't alter the quality of it). You could call it G#o7b13 or G#o7b13, but that implies the existence of a 9, which you doesn't work, and in any case, what would a 9 even mean in the context of a diminished chord? Gm6(#5) is no good, because it loses that it's a diminished chord altogether.

And outside of the more technical question of how to name it. What actually is it? It's tempting to just chalk this interesting chord up to "good voice leading", but I think it's more than that: it sounds remarkably "stable" for one.

I'm in the habit of writing lead sheets down for songs I learn, and the second chord of this stumped me. The notes are, starting at the bottom, G#, F, B E.

The context is

| Am6 | % | chord x | % |

| Gm7 | C9 | FΔ | % |

| Fm6 | % | E7(b9) | A7#5 |

| D6 | Dm9 | F6 | Fm6 |

(the 4 bar turnaround can be done a million different ways, but this is just to give musical context)

The voicing of the first 3 chords would be something like:

enter image description here

You could call it G#o7(#5) (the best option I've come up with), but this implies a sharpened five, whereas to me, the E sounds like an extension rather than a modification of the diminished triad (i.e, if you could have both a D natural and an E natural in the chord and it wouldn't alter the quality of it). You could call it G#o7b13 or G#o7b13, but that implies the existence of a 9, which you doesn't work, and in any case, what would a 9 even mean in the context of a diminished chord? Gm6(#5) is no good, because it loses that it's a diminished chord altogether.

And outside of the more technical question of how to name it. What actually is it? It's tempting to just chalk this interesting chord up to "good voice leading", but I think it's more than that: it sounds remarkably "stable" for such a "dissonant" chord, if that makes any sense. Obviously the context really helps it, but it is a really interesting and gorgeous chord just in its own right.

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