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Most new drummers have this problem. It's common, and easily overcome. The way to go about it is something you'll hear from every drum instructor you encounter. COUNT. That's it, that's all. That being said, everyone does learn differently. Meaning some people are auditory learners, some visual, some audio/visual. The exercise that the user above posted is helpful for a visual person because it does help to see beats in actual numbers while others can achieve the same effect by merely hearing it back. So it will always depend on counting, and how you use that information. And I agree a metronome helps a great deal especially if you are the auditory type. Good luck, don't give up. Everything takes everyone their own time to learn. What comes easily to one, takes hard work for another. Mostly... enjoy yourself. Play along with your favorite bands whether you get it right or not it helps to try your best to keep time because drumming is about keeping time. Like every other instrument you have to understand how music works to be able to execute it. Guitar takes syncopation, scales, and time. Drums takes learning time signatures slowly in practice. The separating between hand/hand/foot/foot comes both literally and figuratively ... in time. This may help you too? If you've never heard of him well... it's time. http://www.daveweckl.com

Most new drummers have this problem. It's common, and easily overcome. The way to go about it is something you'll hear from every drum instructor you encounter. COUNT. That's it, that's all. That being said, everyone does learn differently. Meaning some people are auditory learners, some visual, some audio/visual. The exercise that the user above posted is helpful for a visual person because it does help to see beats in actual numbers while others can achieve the same effect by merely hearing it back. So it will always depend on counting, and how you use that information. And I agree a metronome helps a great deal especially if you are the auditory type. Good luck, don't give up. Everything takes everyone their own time to learn. What comes easily to one, takes hard work for another. Mostly... enjoy yourself. Play along with your favorite bands whether you get it right or not it helps to try your best to keep time because drumming is about keeping time. Like every other instrument you have to understand how music works to be able to execute it. Guitar takes syncopation, scales, and time. Drums takes learning time signatures slowly in practice. The separating between hand/hand/foot/foot comes both literally and figuratively ... in time.

Most new drummers have this problem. It's common, and easily overcome. The way to go about it is something you'll hear from every drum instructor you encounter. COUNT. That's it, that's all. That being said, everyone does learn differently. Meaning some people are auditory learners, some visual, some audio/visual. The exercise that the user above posted is helpful for a visual person because it does help to see beats in actual numbers while others can achieve the same effect by merely hearing it back. So it will always depend on counting, and how you use that information. And I agree a metronome helps a great deal especially if you are the auditory type. Good luck, don't give up. Everything takes everyone their own time to learn. What comes easily to one, takes hard work for another. Mostly... enjoy yourself. Play along with your favorite bands whether you get it right or not it helps to try your best to keep time because drumming is about keeping time. Like every other instrument you have to understand how music works to be able to execute it. Guitar takes syncopation, scales, and time. Drums takes learning time signatures slowly in practice. The separating between hand/hand/foot/foot comes both literally and figuratively ... in time. This may help you too? If you've never heard of him well... it's time. http://www.daveweckl.com

Source Link
LMD
  • 1
  • 1

Most new drummers have this problem. It's common, and easily overcome. The way to go about it is something you'll hear from every drum instructor you encounter. COUNT. That's it, that's all. That being said, everyone does learn differently. Meaning some people are auditory learners, some visual, some audio/visual. The exercise that the user above posted is helpful for a visual person because it does help to see beats in actual numbers while others can achieve the same effect by merely hearing it back. So it will always depend on counting, and how you use that information. And I agree a metronome helps a great deal especially if you are the auditory type. Good luck, don't give up. Everything takes everyone their own time to learn. What comes easily to one, takes hard work for another. Mostly... enjoy yourself. Play along with your favorite bands whether you get it right or not it helps to try your best to keep time because drumming is about keeping time. Like every other instrument you have to understand how music works to be able to execute it. Guitar takes syncopation, scales, and time. Drums takes learning time signatures slowly in practice. The separating between hand/hand/foot/foot comes both literally and figuratively ... in time.