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I don't have any particular musical experience with this but some terminology and ideas that might be useful:

  • On the electronics test bench, what you are looking for is known as an arbitrary waveform generation and is a feature of signal generators. However, itIt totally doesn't make sense to buy one if you're just going to convert its output to digital audio right away, but perhaps knowing the name is useful.

  • If you're up for a bit of programming, you could generate a file containing just the sequence of binary numbers representing the waveform, up to however many repetitions is useful, and then use an audio editor (such as Audacity (which I make no claim is a good choice, just that I know it can do this and it is free)) to convert it to a more typical audio format, if your programming language of choice doesn't have a handy library to write audio files anyway. Just about any language would be able to put the binary data in a file, though some make it easier than others.

    I also have learned that Pure Data, a visual programming environment for music among other things, easily allows doing this; you can literally draw a waveform with your mouse (or load it from a file) as it is playing. (I don't have it in front of me so I can't provide an example; I'll see if I can get to that later.)

  • The technique of using arbitrary waveforms and changing between them to change timbre is called wavetable synthesis. You might have some look finding software intended to do this that also allows loading/creating new waveforms — I don't know whether that's a thing as I only recently learned the concept, but it seemed relevant enough to mention.

  • You could put it together from scratch using simple audio editing operations (I feel like Audacity should be able to do all of this but I don't have it in front of me to check): generate or import a square wave, delete the low half, generate a triangle, then take the whole thing and duplicate/repeat it for as many periods as you need.

I don't have any particular musical experience with this but some terminology and ideas that might be useful:

  • On the electronics test bench, what you are looking for is known as an arbitrary waveform generation and is a feature of signal generators. However, it totally doesn't make sense to buy one if you're just going to convert its output to digital audio right away.

  • If you're up for a bit of programming, you could generate a file containing just the sequence of binary numbers representing the waveform, up to however many repetitions is useful, and then use an audio editor (such as Audacity (which I make no claim is a good choice, just that I know it can do this and it is free)) to convert it to a more typical audio format, if your programming language of choice doesn't have a handy library to write audio files anyway. Just about any language would be able to put the binary data in a file, though some make it easier than others.

    I also have learned that Pure Data, a visual programming environment for music among other things, easily allows doing this; you can literally draw a waveform with your mouse (or load it from a file) as it is playing. (I don't have it in front of me so I can't provide an example; I'll see if I can get to that later.)

  • The technique of using arbitrary waveforms and changing between them to change timbre is called wavetable synthesis. You might have some look finding software intended to do this that also allows loading/creating new waveforms — I don't know whether that's a thing as I only recently learned the concept, but it seemed relevant enough to mention.

  • You could put it together from scratch using simple audio editing operations (I feel like Audacity should be able to do all of this but I don't have it in front of me to check): generate or import a square wave, delete the low half, generate a triangle, then take the whole thing and duplicate/repeat it for as many periods as you need.

I don't have any particular musical experience with this but some terminology and ideas that might be useful:

  • On the electronics test bench, what you are looking for is known as arbitrary waveform generation and is a feature of signal generators. It totally doesn't make sense to buy one if you're just going to convert its output to digital audio right away, but perhaps knowing the name is useful.

  • If you're up for a bit of programming, you could generate a file containing just the sequence of binary numbers representing the waveform, up to however many repetitions is useful, and then use an audio editor (such as Audacity (which I make no claim is a good choice, just that I know it can do this and it is free)) to convert it to a more typical audio format, if your programming language of choice doesn't have a handy library to write audio files anyway. Just about any language would be able to put the binary data in a file, though some make it easier than others.

    I also have learned that Pure Data, a visual programming environment for music among other things, easily allows doing this; you can literally draw a waveform with your mouse (or load it from a file) as it is playing. (I don't have it in front of me so I can't provide an example; I'll see if I can get to that later.)

  • The technique of using arbitrary waveforms and changing between them to change timbre is called wavetable synthesis. You might have some look finding software intended to do this that also allows loading/creating new waveforms — I don't know whether that's a thing as I only recently learned the concept, but it seemed relevant enough to mention.

  • You could put it together from scratch using simple audio editing operations (I feel like Audacity should be able to do all of this but I don't have it in front of me to check): generate or import a square wave, delete the low half, generate a triangle, then take the whole thing and duplicate/repeat it for as many periods as you need.

3 added 9 characters in body
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I don't have any particular musical experience with this but some terminology and ideas that might be useful:

  • On the electronics test bench, what you are looking for is known as an arbitrary waveform generation and is a feature of signal generators. However, it totally doesn't make sense to buy one if you're just going to convert its output to digital audio right away.

  • If you're up for a bit of programming, you could generate a file containing just the sequence of binary numbers representing the waveform, up to however many repetitions is useful, and then use an audio editor (such as Audacity (which I make no claim is a good choice, just that I know it can do this and it is free)) to convert it to a more typical audio format, if your programming language of choice doesn't have a handy library to write audio files anyway. Just about any language would be able to put the binary data in a file, though some make it easier than others.

    I also have learned that Pure Data, a visual programming environment for music among other things, easily allows doing this; you can literally draw a waveform with your mouse (or load it from a file) as it is playing. (I don't have it in front of me so I can't provide an example; I'll see if I can get to that later.)

  • The technique of using arbitrary waveforms and changing between them to change timbre is called wavetable synthesis. You might have some look finding software intended to do this that also allows loading/creating new waveforms — I don't know whether that's a thing as I only recently learned the concept, but it seemed relevant enough to mention.

  • You could put it together from scratch using simple audio editing operations (I feel like Audacity should be able to do all of this but I don't have it in front of me to check): generate or import a square wave, delete the low half, generate a triangle, then take the whole thing and duplicate/repeat it for as many periods as you need.

I don't have any particular musical experience with this but some terminology and ideas that might be useful:

  • On the electronics test bench, what you are looking for is known as an arbitrary waveform generation and is a feature of signal generators. However, it totally doesn't make sense to buy one if you're just going to convert its output to digital audio right away.

  • If you're up for a bit of programming, you could generate a file containing just the sequence of binary numbers representing the waveform, up to however many repetitions is useful, and then use an audio editor (such as Audacity (which I make no claim is good, just that I know it can do this and it is free)) to convert it to a more typical audio format, if your programming language of choice doesn't have a handy library to write audio files anyway. Just about any language would be able to put the binary data in a file, though some make it easier than others.

    I also have learned that Pure Data, a visual programming environment for music among other things, easily allows doing this; you can literally draw a waveform with your mouse (or load it from a file) as it is playing. (I don't have it in front of me so I can't provide an example; I'll see if I can get to that later.)

  • The technique of using arbitrary waveforms and changing between them to change timbre is called wavetable synthesis. You might have some look finding software intended to do this that also allows loading/creating new waveforms — I don't know whether that's a thing as I only recently learned the concept, but it seemed relevant enough to mention.

  • You could put it together from scratch using simple audio editing operations (I feel like Audacity should be able to do all of this but I don't have it in front of me to check): generate or import a square wave, delete the low half, generate a triangle, then take the whole thing and duplicate/repeat it for as many periods as you need.

I don't have any particular musical experience with this but some terminology and ideas that might be useful:

  • On the electronics test bench, what you are looking for is known as an arbitrary waveform generation and is a feature of signal generators. However, it totally doesn't make sense to buy one if you're just going to convert its output to digital audio right away.

  • If you're up for a bit of programming, you could generate a file containing just the sequence of binary numbers representing the waveform, up to however many repetitions is useful, and then use an audio editor (such as Audacity (which I make no claim is a good choice, just that I know it can do this and it is free)) to convert it to a more typical audio format, if your programming language of choice doesn't have a handy library to write audio files anyway. Just about any language would be able to put the binary data in a file, though some make it easier than others.

    I also have learned that Pure Data, a visual programming environment for music among other things, easily allows doing this; you can literally draw a waveform with your mouse (or load it from a file) as it is playing. (I don't have it in front of me so I can't provide an example; I'll see if I can get to that later.)

  • The technique of using arbitrary waveforms and changing between them to change timbre is called wavetable synthesis. You might have some look finding software intended to do this that also allows loading/creating new waveforms — I don't know whether that's a thing as I only recently learned the concept, but it seemed relevant enough to mention.

  • You could put it together from scratch using simple audio editing operations (I feel like Audacity should be able to do all of this but I don't have it in front of me to check): generate or import a square wave, delete the low half, generate a triangle, then take the whole thing and duplicate/repeat it for as many periods as you need.

2 added 112 characters in body
source | link

I don't have any particular musical experience with this but some terminology and ideas that might be useful:

  • On the electronics test bench, what you are looking for is known as an arbitrary waveform generation and is a feature of signal generators. However, it totally doesn't make sense to buy one if you're just going to convert its output to digital audio right away.

  • If you're up for a bit of programming, you could generate a file containing just the sequence of binary numbers representing the waveform, up to however many repetitions is useful, and then use an audio editor (such as Audacity (which I make no claim is good, just that I know it can do this and it is free)) to convert it to a more typical audio format, if your programming language of choice doesn't have a handy library to write audio files anyway. Just about any language would be able to put the binary data in a file, though some make it easier than others.

    I also have learned that Pure Data, a visual programming environment for music among other things, easily allows doing this; you can literally draw a waveform with your mouse (or load it from a file) as it is playing. (I don't have it in front of me so I can't provide an example; I'll see if I can get to that later.)

  • The technique of using arbitrary waveforms and changing between them to change timbre is called wavetable synthesis. You might have some look finding software intended to do this that also allows loading/creating new waveforms — I don't know whether that's a thing as I only recently learned the concept, but it seemed relevant enough to mention.

  • You could put it together from scratch using simple audio editing operations (I feel like Audacity should be able to do all of this but I don't have it in front of me to check): generate or import a square wave, delete the low half, generate a triangle, then take the whole thing and duplicate/repeat it for as many periods as you need.

I don't have any particular musical experience with this but some terminology and ideas that might be useful:

  • On the electronics test bench, what you are looking for is known as an arbitrary waveform generation and is a feature of signal generators. However, it totally doesn't make sense to buy one if you're just going to convert its output to digital audio right away.

  • If you're up for a bit of programming, you could generate a file containing just the sequence of binary numbers representing the waveform, up to however many repetitions is useful, and then use an audio editor (such as Audacity (which I make no claim is good, just that I know it can do this and it is free)) to convert it to a more typical audio format, if your programming language of choice doesn't have a handy library to write audio files anyway.

    I also have learned that Pure Data, a visual programming environment for music among other things, easily allows doing this; you can literally draw a waveform with your mouse (or load it from a file) as it is playing. (I don't have it in front of me so I can't provide an example; I'll see if I can get to that later.)

  • The technique of using arbitrary waveforms and changing between them to change timbre is called wavetable synthesis. You might have some look finding software intended to do this that also allows loading/creating new waveforms — I don't know whether that's a thing as I only recently learned the concept.

  • You could put it together from scratch using simple audio editing operations (I feel like Audacity should be able to do all of this but I don't have it in front of me to check): generate or import a square wave, delete the low half, generate a triangle, then take the whole thing and duplicate/repeat it for as many periods as you need.

I don't have any particular musical experience with this but some terminology and ideas that might be useful:

  • On the electronics test bench, what you are looking for is known as an arbitrary waveform generation and is a feature of signal generators. However, it totally doesn't make sense to buy one if you're just going to convert its output to digital audio right away.

  • If you're up for a bit of programming, you could generate a file containing just the sequence of binary numbers representing the waveform, up to however many repetitions is useful, and then use an audio editor (such as Audacity (which I make no claim is good, just that I know it can do this and it is free)) to convert it to a more typical audio format, if your programming language of choice doesn't have a handy library to write audio files anyway. Just about any language would be able to put the binary data in a file, though some make it easier than others.

    I also have learned that Pure Data, a visual programming environment for music among other things, easily allows doing this; you can literally draw a waveform with your mouse (or load it from a file) as it is playing. (I don't have it in front of me so I can't provide an example; I'll see if I can get to that later.)

  • The technique of using arbitrary waveforms and changing between them to change timbre is called wavetable synthesis. You might have some look finding software intended to do this that also allows loading/creating new waveforms — I don't know whether that's a thing as I only recently learned the concept, but it seemed relevant enough to mention.

  • You could put it together from scratch using simple audio editing operations (I feel like Audacity should be able to do all of this but I don't have it in front of me to check): generate or import a square wave, delete the low half, generate a triangle, then take the whole thing and duplicate/repeat it for as many periods as you need.

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