2 added 16 characters in body
source | link

I suggest you don't worry too much about the 'why', just accept that in chord names the intervals are by default major except for 7ths which are minor unless specified as major.

But if you want a historical justification - in functional harmony 7th chords normally had a (primary or secondary) dominant function. You'd find 'cycle of 5ths' progressions, Bm7b5, Em7, Am7, Dm7, G7, C. All the 7ths were minor. Those juicypleasantly astringent maj7 harmonies (that we're very accustomed to hear now) were less common.

I suggest you don't worry too much about the 'why', just accept that in chord names the intervals are by default major except for 7ths which are minor unless specified as major.

But if you want a historical justification - in functional harmony 7th chords normally had a (primary or secondary) dominant function. You'd find 'cycle of 5ths' progressions, Bm7b5, Em7, Am7, Dm7, G7, C. All the 7ths were minor. Those juicy maj7 harmonies (that we're very accustomed to hear now) were less common.

I suggest you don't worry too much about the 'why', just accept that in chord names the intervals are by default major except for 7ths which are minor unless specified as major.

But if you want a historical justification - in functional harmony 7th chords normally had a (primary or secondary) dominant function. You'd find 'cycle of 5ths' progressions, Bm7b5, Em7, Am7, Dm7, G7, C. All the 7ths were minor. Those pleasantly astringent maj7 harmonies (that we're very accustomed to hear now) were less common.

1
source | link

I suggest you don't worry too much about the 'why', just accept that in chord names the intervals are by default major except for 7ths which are minor unless specified as major.

But if you want a historical justification - in functional harmony 7th chords normally had a (primary or secondary) dominant function. You'd find 'cycle of 5ths' progressions, Bm7b5, Em7, Am7, Dm7, G7, C. All the 7ths were minor. Those juicy maj7 harmonies (that we're very accustomed to hear now) were less common.