2 Corrected grammar
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When you refer to the IV and ii chords of major key as subdominant, you are using a field of musical analysis called functional harmony (video reference). As for the reason why notes like the 4th and 7th in major want to resolve, the explanation that I have heard is that both sit a semitone away from the notes of the root major triad, the 1-3-5. Further, the 7th is said to be the most directional because it sits right below the root, the most important note in a key.

Minor, on the other hand, is a whole different can of worms. In fact, in the common practice period, composers found that the chords build with the natural minor scale were so undirectional they invented the harmonic minor scale to solve that problem without having to change key. If you want to apply the ideas of functional harmony to minor you have to take some liberties. The author of the video which I likedlinked has another one about exactly this topic linked here. To my knowledge, music theorists do not believe that the 4th wants to resolve to the ♭3rd or the ♭7th wants to resolve to the 1st. When you want to think of subdominant function in minor, look to the subdominant chords in the relative major key. The relative major's IV is minor's ♭VI and its ii is minor's iv. The main subdominant chords in minor are actually the ♭VI and iv. Usually, the iio in minor is considered to be dominate (and is played as a 7th chord often). In common practice music, the ii chordschord is also used in minor and can be considered subdominant.

It is worth knowing that functional harmony was developed around major. Sometimes, the ♭III or ♭VII are subdominant in minor. On the most basic level, what makes a chord subdominant is not its notes in particular, but the fact that it sets up the dominant chord.

I'd like to include a general note, which is something that I needed clarifying recently. There isn't any law of the universe saying that one note needs to resolve down or up to another or that it even can. Music theory is about giving structure and explanations to what is going on in music. 4ths going to 3rds and 7ths going up to 1sts or them feeling the pull to their respective note (resolution) is just an observation shared by many theorists and musicians alike. It may not be true for you, in part or entirely.

When you refer to the IV and ii chords of major key as subdominant, you are using a field of musical analysis called functional harmony (video reference). As for the reason why notes like the 4th and 7th in major want to resolve, the explanation that I have heard is that both sit a semitone away from the notes of the root major triad, the 1-3-5. Further, the 7th is said to be the most directional because it sits right below the root, the most important note in a key.

Minor, on the other hand, is a whole different can of worms. In fact, in the common practice period, composers found that the chords build with the natural minor were so undirectional they invented the harmonic minor scale to solve that problem without having to change key. If you want to apply the ideas of functional harmony to minor you have to take some liberties. The author of the video which I liked has another about exactly this linked here. To my knowledge, music theorists do not believe that the 4th wants to resolve to the ♭3rd or the ♭7th wants to resolve to the 1st. When you want to think of subdominant function in minor, look to the subdominant chords in the relative major key. The relative major's IV is minor's ♭VI and its ii is minor's iv. The subdominant chords in minor are actually the ♭VI and iv. Usually, the iio in minor is considered to be dominate (and is played as a 7th chord often). In common practice music, the ii chords is also used in minor and can be considered subdominant.

It is worth knowing that functional harmony was developed around major. Sometimes the ♭III or ♭VII are subdominant in minor. On the most basic level, what makes a chord subdominant is not its notes in particular but the fact that it sets up the dominant chord.

I'd like to include a general note which is something that I needed clarifying recently. There isn't any law of the universe saying that one note needs to resolve down or up to another or that it even can. Music theory is about giving structure and explanations to what is going on in music. 4ths going to 3rds and 7ths going up to 1sts or them feeling the pull to their respective note (resolution) is just an observation shared by many theorists and musicians alike. It may not be true for you, in part or entirely.

When you refer to the IV and ii chords of major key as subdominant, you are using a field of musical analysis called functional harmony (video reference). As for the reason why notes like the 4th and 7th in major want to resolve, the explanation that I have heard is that both sit a semitone away from the notes of the root major triad, the 1-3-5. Further, the 7th is said to be the most directional because it sits right below the root, the most important note in a key.

Minor, on the other hand, is a whole different can of worms. In fact, in the common practice period, composers found that the chords build with the natural minor scale were so undirectional they invented the harmonic minor scale to solve that problem without having to change key. If you want to apply the ideas of functional harmony to minor you have to take some liberties. The author of the video which I linked has another one about exactly this topic linked here. To my knowledge, music theorists do not believe that the 4th wants to resolve to the ♭3rd or the ♭7th wants to resolve to the 1st. When you want to think of subdominant function in minor, look to the subdominant chords in the relative major key. The relative major's IV is minor's ♭VI and its ii is minor's iv. The main subdominant chords in minor are actually the ♭VI and iv. Usually, the iio in minor is considered to be dominate (and is played as a 7th chord often). In common practice music, the ii chord is also used in minor and can be considered subdominant.

It is worth knowing that functional harmony was developed around major. Sometimes, the ♭III or ♭VII are subdominant in minor. On the most basic level, what makes a chord subdominant is not its notes in particular, but the fact that it sets up the dominant chord.

I'd like to include a general note, which is something that I needed clarifying recently. There isn't any law of the universe saying that one note needs to resolve down or up to another or that it even can. Music theory is about giving structure and explanations to what is going on in music. 4ths going to 3rds and 7ths going up to 1sts or them feeling the pull to their respective note (resolution) is just an observation shared by many theorists and musicians alike. It may not be true for you, in part or entirely.

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When you refer to the IV and ii chords of major key as subdominant, you are using a field of musical analysis called functional harmony (video reference). As for the reason why notes like the 4th and 7th in major want to resolve, the explanation that I have heard is that both sit a semitone away from the notes of the root major triad, the 1-3-5. Further, the 7th is said to be the most directional because it sits right below the root, the most important note in a key.

Minor, on the other hand, is a whole different can of worms. In fact, in the common practice period, composers found that the chords build with the natural minor were so undirectional they invented the harmonic minor scale to solve that problem without having to change key. If you want to apply the ideas of functional harmony to minor you have to take some liberties. The author of the video which I liked has another about exactly this linked here. To my knowledge, music theorists do not believe that the 4th wants to resolve to the ♭3rd or the ♭7th wants to resolve to the 1st. When you want to think of subdominant function in minor, look to the subdominant chords in the relative major key. The relative major's IV is minor's ♭VI and its ii is minor's iv. The subdominant chords in minor are actually the ♭VI and iv. Usually, the iio in minor is considered to be dominate (and is played as a 7th chord often). In common practice music, the ii chords is also used in minor and can be considered subdominant.

It is worth knowing that functional harmony was developed around major. Sometimes the ♭III or ♭VII are subdominant in minor. On the most basic level, what makes a chord subdominant is not its notes in particular but the fact that it sets up the dominant chord.

I'd like to include a general note which is something that I needed clarifying recently. There isn't any law of the universe saying that one note needs to resolve down or up to another or that it even can. Music theory is about giving structure and explanations to what is going on in music. 4ths going to 3rds and 7ths going up to 1sts or them feeling the pull to their respective note (resolution) is just an observation shared by many theorists and musicians alike. It may not be true for you, in part or entirely.