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Disclaimer: I'm not a violinist. What follows is all head-knowledge, not practical experience.

As you know, since a violin bridge is curved, no more than two strings can sound at a time, so any chord will of course need to be arpeggiated. This isn't that big a deal, and is part of the characteristic sound of violin stops.

However, you also need to consider where the fingers will be stopping the strings. As I'm sure you know, violin strings are tuned in fifths. In order to play a chord, each note must be located on one of those four strings. Your chord has a high C, E♭, G, and a top C, which would need to be played o the G, D, A, and E strings respectively. The C on the G string is up an octave and a fourth (up 17 semitones), which is well past the half way point along the string. Now I'm not sure how high a violinist can go up the neck, especially on the G string, so I don't know if that's actually possible. But let's assume it is, and look at the rest of the chord. The F is going to be played on the D string, a minor third more than an octave (so 15 semitones up), the A♭ is going to be played on the A string (13 semitones up), and the top C will be on the E string (8 semitones up). You can think of these counts of "semitones up" as if they were imaginary frets on a guitar, so your essentially asking for a chord that requires fingering on the 8th, 13th, 15th, and 17th imaginary "frets" -- covering a span of 9 "frets". I believe in normal violin playing, the fingers are all within about 5 or 6 "frets" of each other. Nine is probably more than what can be stretched.

This is why violins are not good with close-voiced chords. If you want to retain a chord, one possibility might be to use a more open voicing. Obviously, you need to retain the top C, as that's the melody note. Skip the A♭ below that, and go down the F. That's a fifth below the C so it will use the same 8th "fret" as the the C on the E string. Then add the A♭ a sixth below that (and octave below the one you have written). That fits on the D string at the 6th "fret". At this point, you've got all thee notes of the chord covered, and you may not even need to add a fourth note. You'd have to check with a violinist to be sure, but I would think this open-voiced chord should be more doable on a violin.

A completely different possibility, though perhaps not elegant, would be to split the chord up between the first and second violins. For example, the first could play the octave C that your friend suggests, while the second plays an A♭ and F (either separated by a third, or by a sixth as above). In this case, the 2nd violin's F on beat two could either be missed, or added as a double stop to the viola.

Finally, if you want to notate an arpeggio that isn't a quadruple stop, instead of using a chord with (or without) an arpeggio symbol, I think it might be clearedclearer to notate it as a series of arpeggiated grace notes (as WillRoss1 already suggested). I say this purely from a notational standpoint, without knowing if it's any more playable, though Jomiddnz seems to indicate it is.

Disclaimer: I'm not a violinist. What follows is all head-knowledge, not practical experience.

As you know, since a violin bridge is curved, no more than two strings can sound at a time, so any chord will of course need to be arpeggiated. This isn't that big a deal, and is part of the characteristic sound of violin stops.

However, you also need to consider where the fingers will be stopping the strings. As I'm sure you know, violin strings are tuned in fifths. In order to play a chord, each note must be located on one of those four strings. Your chord has a high C, E♭, G, and a top C, which would need to be played o the G, D, A, and E strings respectively. The C on the G string is up an octave and a fourth (up 17 semitones), which is well past the half way point along the string. Now I'm not sure how high a violinist can go up the neck, especially on the G string, so I don't know if that's actually possible. But let's assume it is, and look at the rest of the chord. The F is going to be played on the D string, a minor third more than an octave (so 15 semitones up), the A♭ is going to be played on the A string (13 semitones up), and the top C will be on the E string (8 semitones up). You can think of these counts of "semitones up" as if they were imaginary frets on a guitar, so your essentially asking for a chord that requires fingering on the 8th, 13th, 15th, and 17th imaginary "frets" -- covering a span of 9 "frets". I believe in normal violin playing, the fingers are all within about 5 or 6 "frets" of each other. Nine is probably more than what can be stretched.

This is why violins are not good with close-voiced chords. If you want to retain a chord, one possibility might be to use a more open voicing. Obviously, you need to retain the top C, as that's the melody note. Skip the A♭ below that, and go down the F. That's a fifth below the C so it will use the same 8th "fret" as the the C on the E string. Then add the A♭ a sixth below that (and octave below the one you have written). That fits on the D string at the 6th "fret". At this point, you've got all thee notes of the chord covered, and you may not even need to add a fourth note. You'd have to check with a violinist to be sure, but I would think this open-voiced chord should be more doable on a violin.

A completely different possibility, though perhaps not elegant, would be to split the chord up between the first and second violins. For example, the first could play the octave C that your friend suggests, while the second plays an A♭ and F (either separated by a third, or by a sixth as above). In this case, the 2nd violin's F on beat two could either be missed, or added as a double stop to the viola.

Finally, if you want to notate an arpeggio that isn't a quadruple stop, instead of using a chord with (or without) an arpeggio symbol, I think it might be cleared to notate it as a series of arpeggiated grace notes.

Disclaimer: I'm not a violinist. What follows is all head-knowledge, not practical experience.

As you know, since a violin bridge is curved, no more than two strings can sound at a time, so any chord will of course need to be arpeggiated. This isn't that big a deal, and is part of the characteristic sound of violin stops.

However, you also need to consider where the fingers will be stopping the strings. As I'm sure you know, violin strings are tuned in fifths. In order to play a chord, each note must be located on one of those four strings. Your chord has a high C, E♭, G, and a top C, which would need to be played o the G, D, A, and E strings respectively. The C on the G string is up an octave and a fourth (up 17 semitones), which is well past the half way point along the string. Now I'm not sure how high a violinist can go up the neck, especially on the G string, so I don't know if that's actually possible. But let's assume it is, and look at the rest of the chord. The F is going to be played on the D string, a minor third more than an octave (so 15 semitones up), the A♭ is going to be played on the A string (13 semitones up), and the top C will be on the E string (8 semitones up). You can think of these counts of "semitones up" as if they were imaginary frets on a guitar, so your essentially asking for a chord that requires fingering on the 8th, 13th, 15th, and 17th imaginary "frets" -- covering a span of 9 "frets". I believe in normal violin playing, the fingers are all within about 5 or 6 "frets" of each other. Nine is probably more than what can be stretched.

This is why violins are not good with close-voiced chords. If you want to retain a chord, one possibility might be to use a more open voicing. Obviously, you need to retain the top C, as that's the melody note. Skip the A♭ below that, and go down the F. That's a fifth below the C so it will use the same 8th "fret" as the the C on the E string. Then add the A♭ a sixth below that (and octave below the one you have written). That fits on the D string at the 6th "fret". At this point, you've got all thee notes of the chord covered, and you may not even need to add a fourth note. You'd have to check with a violinist to be sure, but I would think this open-voiced chord should be more doable on a violin.

A completely different possibility, though perhaps not elegant, would be to split the chord up between the first and second violins. For example, the first could play the octave C that your friend suggests, while the second plays an A♭ and F (either separated by a third, or by a sixth as above). In this case, the 2nd violin's F on beat two could either be missed, or added as a double stop to the viola.

Finally, if you want to notate an arpeggio that isn't a quadruple stop, instead of using a chord with (or without) an arpeggio symbol, I think it might be clearer to notate it as a series of arpeggiated grace notes (as WillRoss1 already suggested). I say this purely from a notational standpoint, without knowing if it's any more playable, though Jomiddnz seems to indicate it is.

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Disclaimer: I'm not a violinist. What follows is all head-knowledge, not practical experience.

As you know, since a violin bridge is curved, no more than two strings can sound at a time, so any chord will of course need to be arpeggiated. This isn't that big a deal, and is part of the characteristic sound of violin stops.

However, you also need to consider where the fingers will be stopping the strings. As I'm sure you know, violin strings are tuned in fifths. In order to play a chord, each note must be located on one of those four strings. Your chord has a high C, E♭, G, and a top C, which would need to be played o the G, D, A, and E strings respectively. The C on the G string is up an octave and a fourth (up 17 semitones), which is well past the half way point along the string. Now I'm not sure how high a violinist can go up the neck, especially on the G string, so I don't know if that's actually possible. But let's assume it is, and look at the rest of the chord. The F is going to be played on the D string, a minor third more than an octave (so 15 semitones up), the A♭ is going to be played on the A string (13 semitones up), and the top C will be on the E string (8 semitones up). You can think of these counts of "semitones up" as if they were imaginary frets on a guitar, so your essentially asking for a chord that requires fingering on the 8th, 13th, 15th, and 17th imaginary "frets" -- covering a span of 9 "frets". I believe in normal violin playing, the fingers are all within about 5 or 6 "frets" of each other. Nine is probably more than what can be stretched.

This is why violins are not good with close-voiced chords. If you want to retain a chord, one possibility might be to use a more open voicing. Obviously, you need to retain the top C, as that's the melody note. Skip the A♭ below that, and go down the F. That's a fifth below the C so it will use the same 8th "fret" as the the C on the E string. Then add the A♭ a sixth below that (and octave below the one you have written). That fits on the D string at the 6th "fret". At this point, you've got all thee notes of the chord covered, and you may not even need to add a fourth note. You'd have to check with a violinist to be sure, but I would think this open-voiced chord should be more doable on a violin.

A completely different possibility, though perhaps not elegant, would be to split the chord up between the first and second violins. For example, the first could play the octave C that your friend suggests, while the second plays an A♭ and F (either separated by a third, or by a sixth as above). In this case, the 2nd violin's F on beat two could either be missed, or added as a double stop to the viola.

Finally, if you want to notate an arpeggio that isn't a quadruple stop, instead of using a chord with (or without) an arpeggio symbol, I think it might be cleared to notate it as a series of arpeggiated grace notes.